Publications by authors named "Katlynn J Emaus"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Rapid Treatment with Intramuscular Magnesium Sulfate During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Does Not Provide Neuroprotection Following Cardiac Arrest.

Mol Neurobiol 2022 Jan 14. Epub 2022 Jan 14.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

Brain injury is the most common cause of death for patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Magnesium is an attractive neuroprotective compound which protects neurons from ischemic injury by reducing neuronal calcium overload via NMDA receptor modulation and preventing calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. Intramuscular (IM) delivery of MgSO during CPR has the potential to target these mechanisms within an early therapeutic window. We hypothesize that IM MgSO administrated during CPR could achieve therapeutic serum magnesium levels within 15 min after ROSC and improve neurologic outcomes in a rat model of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Male Long Evans rats were subjected to 8-min asphyxial cardiac arrest and block randomized to receive placebo, 107 mg/kg, 215 mg/kg, or 430 mg/kg MgSO IM at the onset of CPR. Serum magnesium concentrations increased rapidly with IM delivery during CPR, achieving twofold to fourfold increase by 15 min after ROSC in all magnesium dose groups. Rats subjected to cardiac arrest or sham surgery were block randomized to treatment groups for assessment of neurological outcomes. We found that IM MgSO during CPR had no effect on ROSC rate (p > 0.05). IM MgSO treatment had no statistically significant effect on 10-day survival with good neurologic function or hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron survival compared to placebo treatment. In conclusion, a single dose IM MgSO during CPR achieves up to fourfold baseline serum magnesium levels within 15 min after ROSC; however, this treatment strategy did not improve survival, recovery of neurologic function, or neuron survival. Future studies with repeated dosing or in combination with hypothermic targeted temperature management may be indicated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12035-021-02645-xDOI Listing
January 2022

Mitochondrial fission and mitophagy are independent mechanisms regulating ischemia/reperfusion injury in primary neurons.

Cell Death Dis 2021 05 12;12(5):475. Epub 2021 May 12.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

Mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy are constitutive and complex systems that ensure a healthy mitochondrial network through the segregation and subsequent degradation of damaged mitochondria. Disruption of these systems can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction and has been established as a central mechanism of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Emerging evidence suggests that mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy are integrated systems; however, the role of this relationship in the context of I/R injury remains unclear. To investigate this concept, we utilized primary cortical neurons isolated from the novel dual-reporter mitochondrial quality control knockin mice (C57BL/6-Gt(ROSA)26Sortm1(CAG-mCherry/GFP)Ganl/J) with conditional knockout (KO) of Drp1 to investigate changes in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagic flux during in vitro I/R injury. Mitochondrial dynamics was quantitatively measured in an unbiased manner using a machine learning mitochondrial morphology classification system, which consisted of four different classifications: network, unbranched, swollen, and punctate. Evaluation of mitochondrial morphology and mitophagic flux in primary neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reoxygenation (OGD/R) revealed extensive mitochondrial fragmentation and swelling, together with a significant upregulation in mitophagic flux. Furthermore, the primary morphology of mitochondria undergoing mitophagy was classified as punctate. Colocalization using immunofluorescence as well as western blot analysis revealed that the PINK1/Parkin pathway of mitophagy was activated following OGD/R. Conditional KO of Drp1 prevented mitochondrial fragmentation and swelling following OGD/R but did not alter mitophagic flux. These data provide novel evidence that Drp1 plays a causal role in the progression of I/R injury, but mitophagy does not require Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41419-021-03752-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8115279PMC
May 2021

Machine learning-based classification of mitochondrial morphology in primary neurons and brain.

Sci Rep 2021 03 4;11(1):5133. Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

The mitochondrial network continually undergoes events of fission and fusion. Under physiologic conditions, the network is in equilibrium and is characterized by the presence of both elongated and punctate mitochondria. However, this balanced, homeostatic mitochondrial profile can change morphologic distribution in response to various stressors. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a method that robustly measures mitochondrial morphology with high accuracy. Here, we developed a semi-automated image analysis pipeline for the quantitation of mitochondrial morphology for both in vitro and in vivo applications. The image analysis pipeline was generated and validated utilizing images of primary cortical neurons from transgenic mice, allowing genetic ablation of key components of mitochondrial dynamics. This analysis pipeline was further extended to evaluate mitochondrial morphology in vivo through immunolabeling of brain sections as well as serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. These data demonstrate a highly specific and sensitive method that accurately classifies distinct physiological and pathological mitochondrial morphologies. Furthermore, this workflow employs the use of readily available, free open-source software designed for high throughput image processing, segmentation, and analysis that is customizable to various biological models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-84528-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7933342PMC
March 2021

Time of Day and a Ketogenic Diet Influence Susceptibility to SUDEP in Mice.

Front Neurol 2019 29;10:278. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a major cause of mortality in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Most SUDEP cases occur in bed at night and are preceded by a generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS). Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly caused by mutations in the gene. Affected individuals suffer from refractory seizures and an increased risk of SUDEP. Here, we demonstrate that mice with the loss-of-function mutation (DS) experience more spontaneous seizures and SUDEP during the early night. We also evaluate effects of long-term ketogenic diet (KD) treatment on mortality and seizure frequency. DS mice showed high premature mortality (44% survival by P60) that was associated with increased spontaneous GTCSs 1-2 days prior to SUDEP. KD treated mice had a significant reduction in mortality (86% survival by P60) compared to mice fed a control diet. Interestingly, increased survival was not associated with a decrease in seizure frequency. Further studies are needed to determine how KD confers protection from SUDEP. Moreover, our findings implicate time of day as a factor influencing the occurrence of seizures and SUDEP. DS mice, though nocturnal, are more likely to have SUDEP at night, suggesting that the increased incidence of SUDEP at night in may not be solely due to sleep.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.00278DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449461PMC
March 2019
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