Publications by authors named "Katia Julissa Ponce"

3 Publications

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A hydride transfer complex reprograms NAD metabolism and bypasses senescence.

Mol Cell 2021 09;81(18):3848-3865.e19

CRCHUM, 900 Saint-Denis St, Montréal, QC H2X 0A9, Canada; Département de Biochimie et Médecine Moléculaire, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. Electronic address:

Metabolic rewiring and redox balance play pivotal roles in cancer. Cellular senescence is a barrier for tumorigenesis circumvented in cancer cells by poorly understood mechanisms. We report a multi-enzymatic complex that reprograms NAD metabolism by transferring reducing equivalents from NADH to NADP. This hydride transfer complex (HTC) is assembled by malate dehydrogenase 1, malic enzyme 1, and cytosolic pyruvate carboxylase. HTC is found in phase-separated bodies in the cytosol of cancer or hypoxic cells and can be assembled in vitro with recombinant proteins. HTC is repressed in senescent cells but induced by p53 inactivation. HTC enzymes are highly expressed in mouse and human prostate cancer models, and their inactivation triggers senescence. Exogenous expression of HTC is sufficient to bypass senescence, rescue cells from complex I inhibitors, and cooperate with oncogenic RAS to transform primary cells. Altogether, we provide evidence for a new multi-enzymatic complex that reprograms metabolism and overcomes cellular senescence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2021.08.028DOI Listing
September 2021

An Unusual Maxillary Tumor with Tubuloductal Epithelial Structures, Solid Epithelial Nests and Stromal Odontogenic Ameloblast-Associated Protein Deposits. Tubuloductal/Syringoid Variant of Central Odontogenic Fibroma with Amyloid?

Head Neck Pathol 2021 Aug 2. Epub 2021 Aug 2.

Faculty of Dental Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, H3T 1J4, Canada.

Glandular tumors of jaw bones present, most often, histopathologic features of salivary gland and, rarely, of cutaneous glandular neoplasms. They are thought to originate from odontogenic epithelium. An unusual maxillary tumor presenting as a radiolucency in the periapical area of the right permanent lateral incisor of a 74-year-old male is presented causing root resorption. Preparations revealed occasionally branching tubular cords and ductal structures characterized, mostly, by a bilayer composed of luminal cuboidal to low columnar cytokeratin (CK) 7, Ber-EP4 and occasionally CK8/18 positive cells, and abluminal, CK5/6 positive, basal/basaloid cells revealing nuclear reactivity for p63/p40. Smooth muscle actin and calponin were negative, save for a single focus of calponin positive cells, confirming absence of myoepithelial support or epithelial mesenchymal transition. CK19 exhibited staining of both layers, the luminal being more intense. Eosinophilic secretory material and, occasionally, a luminal pellicle were decorated with CK8/18 and polyclonal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). CD1a identified only rare Langerhans' cells and Ki67 decorated 1-2% of abluminal cell nuclei. Small solid nests of epithelial cells were also present. Infrequently, an apparent transition of a nest into a tubular structure was appreciated. The partially inflamed stroma featured multiple hyalinized acellular deposits consistent with amyloid, as confirmed by bright orange Congo red reactivity with apple-green birefringence, which reacted with odontogenic ameloblast-associated (ODAM) protein antibody but not with antibodies for amelotin and secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein proline-glutamine rich 1. Based on the above, the diagnosis of tubuloductal/syringoid variant of central odontogenic fibroma with ODAM amyloid is favored.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-021-01369-7DOI Listing
August 2021

A proline rich protein from the gingival seal around teeth exhibits antimicrobial properties against Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Sci Rep 2021 01 27;11(1):2353. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Laboratory for the Study of Calcified Tissues and Biomaterials, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

The gingival seal around teeth prevents bacteria from destroying the tooth-supporting tissues and disseminating throughout the body. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major periodontopathogen, degrades components of the specialized extracellular matrix that mediates attachment of the gingiva to the tooth. Of these, secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein proline-glutamine rich 1 (SCPPPQ1) protein has a distinctive resistance to degradation, suggesting that it may offer resistance to bacterial attack. In silico analysis of its amino acid sequence was used to explore its molecular characteristics and to predict its two- and three-dimensional structure. SCPPPQ1 exhibits similarities with both proline-rich and cationic antimicrobial proteins, suggesting a putative antimicrobial potential. A combination of imaging approaches showed that incubation with 20 μM of purified SCPPPQ1 decrease bacterial number (p < 0.01). Fluorescence intensity decreased by 70% following a 2 h incubation of Porphyromonas gingivalis with the protein. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that SCPPPQ1 induced bacterial membrane disruption and breaches. While SCPPPQ1 has no effect on mammalian cells, our results suggest that it is bactericidal to Porphyromonas gingivalis, and that this protein, normally present in the gingival seal, may be exploited to maintain a healthy seal and prevent systemic dissemination of bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-81791-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7840901PMC
January 2021
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