Dr. Kathryn J Schunke, PhD - George Washington University - Research Assistant Professor

Dr. Kathryn J Schunke

PhD

George Washington University

Research Assistant Professor

Washington, DC | United States

Main Specialties: Biology, Cardiovascular Disease

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-0815-8457

Dr. Kathryn J Schunke, PhD - George Washington University - Research Assistant Professor

Dr. Kathryn J Schunke

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: George Washington University - Washington, DC , United States

Specialties:

Education

Dec 2018
George Washington University
Research Assistant Professor
Jan 2017
University of Hawaii
Assistant Professor
Jun 2015
Johns Hopkins University
Postdoctoral Fellow
May 2010
Rutgers university
PhD
Jan 2005 - Jan 2010
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
PhD
Physiology & Integrative Biology
Mar 2005
University of California Davis
BS

Experience

Aug 2015 - Nov 2018
University of Hawaii System

Medicine
Jan 2010 - Jul 2015
Johns Hopkins Medicine
Post doctoral Fellow
Thrombosis & Hemostasis / Neuroscience
Dec 2018
George Washington University
Research Assistant Professor
Biomedical Engineering

Publications

13Publications

93Reads

356Profile Views

94PubMed Central Citations

Protein Kinase C Binding Protein 1(PRKCBP1) Inhibits Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) in the Heart.

Cardiovasc Res 2018 Nov 5. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

From the Center for Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI.

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https://academic.oup.com/cardiovascres/advance-article/doi/1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cvr/cvy278DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads
5.940 Impact Factor

Protein Kinase C Binding Protein 1(PRKCBP1) Inhibits Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) in the Heart

Cardiovasc Res. 2018 Nov 5. doi: 10.1093/cvr/cvy278. [Epub ahead of print]

Cardiovascular Research

Aims: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is a key transcription factor responsible for the induction of genes that facilitate adaptation to hypoxia. To study HIF-1 signaling in the heart, we developed a mouse model in which an oxygen-stable form of HIF-1α can be inducibly expressed in cardiac myocytes, under the regulation of tetracycline. Methods & Results: Remarkably, expression of the transgene in mice generated two distinct phenotypes. One was the expected expression of HIF-regulated transcripts and associated changes in cardiac angiogenesis and contractility. The other was an "unresponsive phenotype" with much less expression of typical HIF-response genes and substantial expression of a zinc-finger protein, Protein Kinase C Binding Protein 1 (PRKCBP1). We have demonstrated that this second phenotype is due to an insertion of a fragment of DNA upstream of the PRKCBP1 gene that contains two additional canonical HIF binding sites and leads to substantial HIF binding, assessed by ChIP, and transcriptional activation. This insertion is found only in the FVB strain of mice that contributed the αMHC-tet binding protein transgene to these biallelic mice. In HEK293 cells transfected with oxygen-stable HIF-1α and PRKCBP1 we demonstrated inhibition of HIF-1 activity by a luciferase reporter assay. Using mouse primary cells and cell lines we show that transfection with oxygen-stable HIF-1α and PRKCBP1 reduced expression of direct HIF-1 gene targets and that knockdown of PRKCBP1 removes that negative inhibition. Consistent with previous reports suggesting that PRKCBP1 modulates the chromatin landscape, we found that HL-1 cells transfected with oxygen-stable HIF-1α and PRKCBP1 have reduced global 5-methyl cytosine compared to HIF-1 alone. Conclusions: We show genetic, transcriptional, biochemical, and physiological evidence that PRKCBP1 inhibits HIF activity. Identification of a new oxygen-dependent and previously unsuspected regulator of HIF may provide a target for new therapeutic approaches to ischemic heart disease.

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November 2018
76 Reads

Separating fast and slow exchange transfer and magnetization transfer using off-resonance variable-delay multiple-pulse (VDMP) MRI.

Magn Reson Med 2018 Oct 5;80(4):1568-1576. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrm.27111DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6077103PMC
October 2018
5 Reads
2 Citations
3.571 Impact Factor

HIF1 mediates a switch in pyruvate kinase isoforms after myocardial infarction.

Physiol Genomics 2018 Jul 13;50(7):479-494. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

Center for Cardiovascular Research, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii , Honolulu, Hawaii.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/physiolgenomics.00130.2017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6087881PMC
July 2018
2 Reads
1 Citation
2.374 Impact Factor

A novel atherothrombotic model of ischemic stroke induced by injection of collagen into the cerebral vasculature.

J Neurosci Methods 2015 Jan 12;239:65-74. Epub 2014 Oct 12.

Department of Anesthesiology/Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2014.10.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5425937PMC
January 2015
10 Reads
2 Citations
2.025 Impact Factor

Cathepsin G-dependent modulation of platelet thrombus formation in vivo by blood neutrophils.

PLoS One 2013 5;8(8):e71447. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

Department of Anesthesiology/Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0071447PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3733958PMC
April 2014
2 Reads
13 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Acetaminophen attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiac fibrosis via osteopontin and GATA4 regulation: reduction of oxidant levels.

J Cell Physiol 2013 Oct;228(10):2006-14

Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcp.24367DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3739938PMC
October 2013
17 Reads
5 Citations
3.840 Impact Factor

Acetaminophen reduces mitochondrial dysfunction during early cerebral postischemic reperfusion in rats.

Brain Res 2010 Mar 14;1319:142-54. Epub 2010 Jan 14.

Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2010.01.013DOI Listing
March 2010
14 Reads
8 Citations
2.843 Impact Factor

Acetaminophen is cardioprotective against H2O2-induced injury in vivo.

Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2008 Oct 14;233(10):1315-22. Epub 2008 Aug 14.

Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3181/0802-RM-68DOI Listing
October 2008
10 Reads
10 Citations

Acetaminophen-mediated cardioprotection via inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore-induced apoptotic pathway.

Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 2007 Dec 5;293(6):H3348-55. Epub 2007 Oct 5.

Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00947.2007DOI Listing
December 2007
10 Reads
13 Citations
3.840 Impact Factor

Antiarrhythmic properties of acetaminophen in the dog.

Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2007 Oct;232(9):1245-52

Division of Life Sciences, Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3181/0701-RM-19DOI Listing
October 2007
8 Reads
4 Citations

1 Read

Top co-authors

Gary F Merrill
Gary F Merrill

Rutgers University

5
Roseli Golfetti
Roseli Golfetti

Rutgers University

4
Sunanda S Baliga
Sunanda S Baliga

Rutgers University

4
Nauder Faraday
Nauder Faraday

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

3
Norell M Hadzimichalis
Norell M Hadzimichalis

Rutgers University

3
Kathryn M Jaques-Robinson
Kathryn M Jaques-Robinson

University of Hawaii

3
Jian Zhang
Jian Zhang

Biomedical Polymers Laboratory

2
Ralph V Shohet
Ralph V Shohet

John A. Burns School of Medicine

2
Jiadi Xu
Jiadi Xu

University of Michigan

2