Publications by authors named "Kathomi Gatwiri"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Boundaries of Belonging: Theorizing Black African Migrant Experiences in Australia.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 12 23;18(1). Epub 2020 Dec 23.

School of Arts and Social Science, Southern Cross University, Gold Coast, QLD 4225, Australia.

As nationalist ideologies intensify in Australia, so do the experiences of 'everyday racism' and exclusion for Black African immigrants. In this article, we utilize critical theories and engage with colonial histories to contextualize Afrodiasporic experiences in Australia, arguing that the conditional acceptance of Black bodies within Australian spaces is contingent upon the status quo of the white hegemony. The tropes and discourses that render the bodies of Black African migrants simultaneously invisible and hyper-visible indicate that immigration is not only a movement of bodies, but also a phenomenon solidly tied to global inequality, power, and the abjection of blackness. Drawing on critical race perspectives and theories of belonging, we highlight through use of literature how Black Africans in Australia are constructed as 'perpetual strangers'. As moral panics and discourses of hyper-criminality are summoned, the bordering processes are also simultaneously co-opted to reinforce scrutiny and securitization, with significant implications for social cohesion, belonging and public health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7793144PMC
December 2020

The implications of Neoliberalism on African economies, health outcomes and wellbeing: a conceptual argument.

Soc Theory Health 2020 26;18(1):86-101. Epub 2019 Jun 26.

Archon Capital, Nairobi, Kenya.

Not only did the 2015 Ebola Outbreak in West African countries leave the whole of the sub-Saharan region with a sense of uncertainty and panic, it was also a stress test to Africa's and the wider world's capacity to respond to and mitigate humanitarian crises in the twenty-first century. One plausible conclusion drawn from the spread and impact of the pandemic is that the pace of health infrastructure development in sub-Saharan Africa has lagged behind its population and economic growth posted in the last decade (2003-2013). An exhaustive audit of health infrastructure and remedial measures is, therefore, critical in navigating Africa to sustainable growth and development in the next decade. For the next charge of growth and development to not only be robust but also more sustainable and resilient to major emergencies (such as Ebola), there is a need to edify the state of healthcare across the continent to ensure the optimisation of the human resource and to redress the gap aggravated by loss of human-hours due to poor health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/s41285-019-00111-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7223727PMC
June 2019

Indigenous Children and Young People in Residential Care: A Systematic Scoping Review.

Trauma Violence Abuse 2019 Oct 30:1524838019881707. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

Gnibi College, Southern Cross University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

In Australia and internationally, Indigenous children are seriously overrepresented in the child welfare system. This article provides an overview of literature investigating the needs of Indigenous children in residential care facilities. The provision of culturally safe and trauma-informed therapeutic care to Indigenous children and young people in residential care recognizes that the trauma and violence that they have experienced is exacerbated by their Indigeneity due to the colonial histories presenting. Utilizing a systematic scoping review methodology, the study returned a total of 637 peer-reviewed articles that were identified and reviewed for inclusion. The process of exclusion resulted in the inclusion of eight peer-reviewed studies and 51 reports and discussion papers sourced from gray literature. Findings from this study, though dearth, indicate that trauma-informed and culturally safe interventions play a significant role in Indigenous children's health and well-being while in care. Their experiences of abuse and neglect transcend individual trauma and include intergenerational pain and suffering resulting from long-lasting impacts of colonization, displacement from culture and country, genocidal policies, racism, and the overall systemic disadvantage. As such, a therapeutic response, embedded within Indigenous cultural frameworks and knowledges of trauma, is not only important but absolutely necessary and aims to acknowledge the intersectionality between the needs of Indigenous children in care and the complex systemic disadvantage impacting them.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1524838019881707DOI Listing
October 2019

From Adversity to Stability to Integration: how One Australian Program is Making a Difference in Therapeutic Foster Care.

J Child Adolesc Trauma 2019 Sep 9;12(3):387-398. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Research and Policy, Australian Chilldhood Foundation, Melbourne, VIC Australia.

This paper discusses two key strategies detailing how "relationship-focused" and "trauma-informed" intervention practices, which form the basis of an Australian therapeutic program called Treatment and Care for Kids (TrACK), made a difference in the lives of highly traumatised children. The TrACK program fosters highly traumatised children who, due to the complexity of their trauma needs, cannot be placed in traditional generalist foster care. Case files of 48 children were reviewed. Children were either current or former clients over a period of 18 years since the program was initiated. In analysing the data, we noticed that children who were once highly dysregulated in the domains of foster care placement, education, arousal regulation and peer relationships were now enjoying an enhanced level of stability in their lives.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40653-018-0236-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7163856PMC
September 2019