Publications by authors named "Katherine L Dec"

6 Publications

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Selected Issues in Sport-Related Concussion (SRC | Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) for the Team Physician: A Consensus Statement.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2021 Aug;20(8):420-431

Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY.

Abstract: Selected Issues in Sport-Related Concussion (SRC | Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) for the Team Physician: A Consensus Statement is title 22 in a series of annual consensus articles written for the practicing team physician. This document provides an overview of select medical issues important to team physicians who are responsible for athletes with sports-related concussion (SRC). This statement was developed by the Team Physician Consensus Conference (TPCC), an annual project-based alliance of six major professional associations. The goal of this TPCC statement is to assist the team physician in providing optimal medical care for the athlete with SRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000871DOI Listing
August 2021

Selected issues in sport-related concussion (SRC|mild traumatic brain injury) for the team physician: a consensus statement.

Br J Sports Med 2021 Jun 16. Epub 2021 Jun 16.

Orthopaedic Surgery, HSS, New York, New York, USA.

Selected Issues in Sport-Related Concussion (SRC|Mild Traumatic Brain Injury) for the Team Physician: A Consensus Statement is title 22 in a series of annual consensus documents written for the practicing team physician. This document provides an overview of selected medical issues important to team physicians who are responsible for athletes with sports-related concussion (SRC). This statement was developed by the Team Physician Consensus Conference (TPCC), an annual project-based alliance of six major professional associations. The goal of this TPCC statement is to assist the team physician in providing optimal medical care for the athlete with SRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2021-104235DOI Listing
June 2021

Wilderness Preparticipation Evaluation and Considerations for Special Populations.

Wilderness Environ Med 2015 Dec;26(4 Suppl):S76-91

Longs Peak Sports Medicine, Longmont, Colorado (Dr Madden).

Children, older adults, disabled and special needs athletes, and female athletes who participate in outdoor and wilderness sports and activities each face unique risks. For children and adolescents traveling to high altitude, the preparticipation physical evaluation should focus on risk assessment, prevention strategies, early recognition of altitude-related symptoms, management plans, and appropriate follow-up. As the risk and prevalence of chronic disease increases with age, both older patients and providers need to be aware of disease and medication-specific risks relative to wilderness sport and activity participation. Disabled and special needs athletes benefit from careful pre-event planning for the potential medical issues and equipment modifications that may affect their health in wilderness environments. Issues that demand special consideration for female adventurers include pregnancy, contraceptive use, menses, and ferritin levels at altitude. A careful preparticipation evaluation that factors in unique, population- specific risks will help special populations stay healthy and safe on wilderness adventures. The PubMed and SportDiscus databases were searched in 2014 using both MeSH terms and text words and include peer-reviewed English language articles from 1977 to 2014. Additional information was accessed from Web-based sources to produce this narrative review on preparticipation evaluation for special populations undertaking wilderness adventures. Key words include children, adolescent, pediatric, seniors, elderly, disabled, special needs, female, athlete, preparticipiation examination, wilderness medicine, and sports.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2015.09.010DOI Listing
December 2015

Wilderness Preparticipation Evaluation and Considerations for Special Populations.

Clin J Sport Med 2015 Sep;25(5):443-55

*Clinical Outcomes Research, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah; †Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado; ‡CJW Sports Medicine, Richmond, Virginia; §Anne Arundel Medical Center, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center, Annapolis, Maryland; ¶Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri; ‖Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado; **Big Island Family Medicine Center, Lynchburg, Virginia; and ††Longs Peak Sports Medicine, Longmont, Colorado.

Children, older adults, disabled and special needs athletes, and female athletes who participate in outdoor and wilderness sports and activities each face unique risks. For children and adolescents traveling to high altitude, the preparticipation physical evaluation should focus on risk assessment, prevention strategies, early recognition of altitude-related symptoms, management plans, and appropriate follow-up. As the risk and prevalence of chronic disease increases with age, both older patients and providers need to be aware of disease and medication-specific risks relative to wilderness sport and activity participation. Disabled and special needs athletes benefit from careful pre-event planning for the potential medical issues and equipment modifications that may affect their health in wilderness environments. Issues that demand special consideration for female adventurers include pregnancy, contraceptive use, menses, and ferritin levels at altitude. A careful preparticipation evaluation that factors in unique, population-specific risks will help special populations stay healthy and safe on wilderness adventures. The PubMed and SportDiscus databases were searched in 2014 using both MeSH terms and text words and include peer-reviewed English language articles from 1977 to 2014. Additional information was accessed from Web-based sources to produce this narrative review on preparticipation evaluation for special populations undertaking wilderness adventures. Key words include children, adolescent, pediatric, seniors, elderly, disabled, special needs, female, athlete, preparticipiation examination, wilderness medicine, and sports.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0000000000000251DOI Listing
September 2015

Screening for catastrophic neck injuries in sports.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2007 Jan;6(1):16-9

Women's Sports Medicine at Chippenham & Johnston Willis Sports, Medicine, 1429 Johnston-Willis, Richmond, VA 23235, USA.

The cervical spine is prone to injury due to the structure of the articulating vertebrae at the level of C4-C6, where the spinal cord occupies more of the spinal canal. Cervical spine injuries can occur in all sports and all ages. Participation in contact sports certainly increases the possibility of cervical spine injuries. In screening for catastrophic neck injuries it is vital to examine incidence and injury surveillance statistics in sports. These data can help determine sport-specific preponderance of catastrophic injury. Screening methods for predisposition to catastrophic cervical spine injuries include a concise history, physical examination, and radiographic methods. There is currently no universal classification system utilizing imaging of the cervical spine that has been validated as a screening method for catastrophic neck injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11932-007-0006-yDOI Listing
January 2007

Nonoperative versus operative treatment of acute disc injuries in athletes.

Authors:
Katherine L Dec

Curr Sports Med Rep 2002 Feb;1(1):35-42

Sports Medicine/Electromyography, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Integrated Musculoskeletal Medicine Institute, 1429 Johnston Willis Drive, Richmond, VA 23235, USA.

Many factors contribute to intervertebral disc problems; anatomic, physiologic, and mechanical factors are considered in the literature. Disc pathology as the cause of back or neck pain in the athletic population is primarily seen in acute disc injury. The research connecting degenerative disc disease as a precursor to acute disc injury is limited in scope. The research in discogenic etiology of back and neck injuries in the athletic population is also small in number, therefore resulting in limited information supporting the nonoperative versus operative treatment of disc injury. Treatment convention tends to be a conservative, nonoperative approach. Conservative treatment generally includes three phases: acute (palliative), rehabilitative, and maintenance. The operative approach has received more prospective research, but similar functional outcomes as the nonoperative approach for the majority of disc injuries. Treatment options are discussed, in addition to a brief overview of the biochemical and biomechanical environment of disc injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/00149619-200202000-00007DOI Listing
February 2002
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