Publications by authors named "Katherine A Jungers"

5 Publications

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ADAMTS-like 2 (ADAMTSL2) is a secreted glycoprotein that is widely expressed during mouse embryogenesis and is regulated during skeletal myogenesis.

Matrix Biol 2007 Jul 30;26(6):431-41. Epub 2007 Mar 30.

Department of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Research Center, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

ADAMTS-like 2 (ADAMTSL2), is a secreted protein resembling the ancillary domains of the ADAMTS proteases, but with distinct structural features. It has 7 thrombospondin type-1 repeats (TSRs), but an unusually long spacer module, which in both humans and mice, contains a novel insertion bearing six N-glycosylation sites. The ADAMTSL2 protein expressed in HEK293F and COS-1 cells, is a cell-surface and extracellular matrix binding glycoprotein, with N-linked carbohydrate constituting approximately 20% by mass. The 4.0 kb Adamtsl2 mRNA is found most abundantly in adult mouse liver, lung and spleen by northern blotting. During mouse embryogenesis, Adamtsl2 was expressed most strongly in the third week of gestation. Adamtsl2 mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in developing skeletal muscle, liver, bronchial and arterial smooth muscle, skin, intervertebral disc, perichondrium, pancreas and spinal cord. Immunohistochemical localization of ADAMTSL2 protein was similar to mRNA expression. Detection of Adamtsl2 mRNA and protein in developing skeletal myotubes, but not undifferentiated myogenic precursors led us to investigate its regulation during in vitro myogenic differentiation. In C2C12 and 23A2 myogenic cells, but not in 23A2 cells rendered non-myogenic by expression of G12V:H-Ras (9A2 cells), differentiation induced by serum starvation triggered expression of Adamtsl2 mRNA, coordinately with Myog, a marker of muscle differentiation. Furthermore, activation of the key myogenic determinant MyoD in 10T1/2 fibroblasts also triggered expression of Adamtsl2 mRNA. Collectively, the data suggest that induction of Adamtsl2 mRNA is an integral feature of myogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matbio.2007.03.003DOI Listing
July 2007

Adamts9 is widely expressed during mouse embryo development.

Gene Expr Patterns 2005 Jun 20;5(5):609-17. Epub 2005 Apr 20.

Department of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Research Center, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation (ND20), OH 44195, USA.

ADAMTS metalloproteases constitute a family of 19 secreted protein or proteoglycan processing enzymes. ADAMTS9 and its closest mammalian relative, ADAMTS20, are related to gon-1, a metalloprotease required for gonadal morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. Although expressed at generally low levels in embryonic subectodermal mesenchyme, ADAMTS20 is required for melanoblast colonization of skin. Mutations in Adamts20 cause Belted, one of several white spotting alleles in the mouse. In contrast to Adamts20, we previously showed by Northern blotting that Adamts9 was expressed highly throughout mouse development. Using RNA in situ hybridization, we determined the spatial and temporal regulation of Adamts9 during mouse embryogenesis. At 7.5 dpc Adamts9 is expressed in the allantois, trophoblast, parietal endoderm and decidual tissue. At 9.5 dpc it is expressed in head mesoderm and in the developing heart. From 11.5 to 12.5 dpc, Adamts9 is strongly expressed in posterior mesoderm, in the craniofacial region, ventral body wall and diaphragm. After 14.5 dpc, Adamts9 was highly expressed in the mesenchyme of developing lung, kidney, and mesentery. It is expressed during skeletogenesis, being present from 13.5 dpc in perichondrium, in the proliferation zone of growth plates after 15.5 dpc and it is highly expressed in newly formed bone. It is expressed in vascular endothelium and during formation of the pituitary and cochlea, but expression in the central nervous system is limited to the floor plate of the diencephalon, to the ventricular zone of the cerebral cortex and to the choroid plexus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.modgep.2005.03.004DOI Listing
June 2005

Discovery and characterization of a novel, widely expressed metalloprotease, ADAMTS10, and its proteolytic activation.

J Biol Chem 2004 Dec 7;279(49):51208-17. Epub 2004 Sep 7.

Department of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Research Center, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA.

We describe the discovery and characterization of ADAMTS10, a novel metalloprotease encoded by a locus on human chromosome 19 and mouse chromosome 17. ADAMTS10 has the typical modular organization of the ADAMTS family, with five thrombospondin type 1 repeats and a cysteine-rich PLAC (protease and lacunin) domain at the carboxyl terminus. Its domain organization and primary structure is similar to a novel long form of ADAMTS6. In contrast to many ADAMTS proteases, ADAMTS10 is widely expressed in adult tissues and throughout mouse embryo development. In situ hybridization analysis showed widespread expression of Adamts10 in the mouse embryo until 12.5 days of gestation, after which it is then expressed in a more restricted fashion, with especially strong expression in developing lung, bone, and craniofacial region. Mesenchymal, not epithelial, expression in the developing lung, kidney, gonad, salivary gland, and gastrointestinal tract is a consistent feature of Adamts10 regulation. N-terminal sequencing and treatment with decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-chloromethylketone indicate that the ADAMTS10 zymogen is processed by a subtilisin-like proprotein convertase at two sites (Arg64/Gly and Arg233/Ser). The widespread expression of ADAMTS10 suggests that furin, a ubiquitously expressed proprotein convertase, is the likely processing enzyme. ADAMTS10 expressed in HEK293F and COS-1 cells is N-glycosylated and is secreted into the medium, as well as sequestered at the cell surface and extracellular matrix, as demonstrated by cell surface biotinylation and immunolocalization in nonpermeabilized cells. ADAMTS10 is a functional metalloprotease as demonstrated by cleavage of alpha2-macroglobulin, although physiological substrates are presently unknown.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M409036200DOI Listing
December 2004

A defect in a novel ADAMTS family member is the cause of the belted white-spotting mutation.

Development 2003 Oct;130(19):4665-72

Genetics Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02476, USA.

Several features of the pigment defect in belted (bt) mutant mice suggest that it occurs as a result of a defect in melanocyte development that is unique from those described for other classical white-spotting mutations. We report here that bt mice carry mutations in Adamts20, a novel member of the ADAMTS family of secreted metalloproteases. Adamts20 shows a highly dynamic pattern of expression in the developing embryo that generally precedes the appearance of melanoblasts in the same region, and is not expressed in the migrating cells themselves. Adamts20 shows remarkable homology with GON-1, an ADAMTS family protease required for distal tip cell migration in C. elegans. Our results suggest that the role of ADAMTS proteases in the regulation of cell migration has been conserved in mammalian development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.00668DOI Listing
October 2003

Characterization of ADAMTS-9 and ADAMTS-20 as a distinct ADAMTS subfamily related to Caenorhabditis elegans GON-1.

J Biol Chem 2003 Mar 3;278(11):9503-13. Epub 2003 Jan 3.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA.

We demonstrate that in humans, two metalloproteases, ADAMTS-9 (1935 amino acids) and ADAMTS-20 (1911 amino acids) are orthologs of GON-1, an ADAMTS protease required for gonadal morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. ADAMTS-9 and ADAMTS-20 have an identical modular structure, are distinct in possessing 15 TSRs and a unique C-terminal domain, and have a similar gene structure, suggesting that they comprise a new subfamily of human ADAMTS proteases. ADAMTS20 is very sparingly expressed, although it is detectable in epithelial cells of the breast and lung. However, ADAMTS9 is highly expressed in embryonic and adult tissues, and therefore we characterized the ADAMTS-9 protein further. Although the ADAMTS-9 zymogen has many proprotein convertase processing sites, pulse-chase analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and amino acid sequencing demonstrated that maturation to the active form occurs by selective proprotein convertase (e.g. furin) cleavage of the Arg(287)-Phe(288) bond. Although lacking a transmembrane sequence, ADAMTS-9 is retained near the cell surface as well as in the ECM of transiently transfected COS-1 and 293 cells. COS-1 cells transfected with ADAMTS9 (but not vector-transfected cells) proteolytically cleaved bovine versican and aggrecan core proteins at the Glu(441)-Ala(442) bond of versican V1 and the Glu(1771)-Ala(1772) bond of aggrecan, respectively. In contrast, the ADAMTS-9 catalytic domain alone was neither localized to the cell surface nor able to confer these proteolytic activities on cells, demonstrating that the ancillary domains of ADAMTS-9, including the TSRs, are required both for specific extracellular localization and for its versicanase and aggrecanase activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M211009200DOI Listing
March 2003