Publications by authors named "Katerina Muzikova"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

BCL11A deletions result in fetal hemoglobin persistence and neurodevelopmental alterations.

J Clin Invest 2015 Jun 4;125(6):2363-8. Epub 2015 May 4.

A transition from fetal hemoglobin (HbF) to adult hemoglobin (HbA) normally occurs within a few months after birth. Increased production of HbF after this period of infancy ameliorates clinical symptoms of the major disorders of adult β-hemoglobin: β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. The transcription factor BCL11A silences HbF and has been an attractive therapeutic target for increasing HbF levels; however, it is not clear to what extent BCL11A inhibits HbF production or mediates other developmental functions in humans. Here, we identified and characterized 3 patients with rare microdeletions of 2p15-p16.1 who presented with an autism spectrum disorder and developmental delay. Moreover, these patients all exhibited substantial persistence of HbF but otherwise retained apparently normal hematologic and immunologic function. Of the genes within 2p15-p16.1, only BCL11A was commonly deleted in all of the patients. Evaluation of gene expression data sets from developing and adult human brains revealed that BCL11A expression patterns are similar to other genes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Additionally, common SNPs within the second intron of BCL11A are strongly associated with schizophrenia. Together, the study of these rare patients and orthogonal genetic data demonstrates that BCL11A plays a central role in silencing HbF in humans and implicates BCL11A as an important factor for neurodevelopment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI81163DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4497765PMC
June 2015

Prevalence of chromosomally integrated HHV-6 in patients with malignant disease and healthy donors in the Czech Republic.

Folia Microbiol (Praha) 2013 Jan 15;58(1):87-90. Epub 2012 Jul 15.

Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine of Charles University and Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5, CZ 150 06, Czech Republic.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12223-012-0180-zDOI Listing
January 2013

Acute leukemias with ETV6/ABL1 (TEL/ABL) fusion: poor prognosis and prenatal origin.

Genes Chromosomes Cancer 2010 Oct;49(10):873-84

Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, CLIP (Childhood Leukaemia Investigation Prague), Charles University Prague, 2nd Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic.

The ETV6/ABL1 (TEL/ABL) fusion gene is a rare aberration in malignant disorders. Only 19 cases of ETV6/ABL1-positive hematological malignancy have been published, diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia, other types of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm, acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This study reports three new cases (aged 8 months, 5 years, and 33 years) of ALL with the ETV6/ABL1 fusion found by screening 392 newly diagnosed ALL patients (335 children and 57 adults). A thorough review of the literature and an analysis of all published data, including the three new cases, suggest poor prognosis of ETV6/ABL1-positive acute leukemias. The course of the disease in the two pediatric patients is characterized by minimal residual disease monitoring, using quantification of both the ETV6/ABL1 transcript and immunoreceptor gene rearrangements. Eosinophilia could not be confirmed as a hallmark of the ETV6/ABL1-positive disease. Studies of neonatal blood spots demonstrated that, in the child diagnosed at five years, the ETV6/ABL1 fusion initiating the ALL originated prenatally.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gcc.20796DOI Listing
October 2010

Prevalence of HHV-6 integrated chromosomally among children treated for acute lymphoblastic or myeloid leukemia in the Czech Republic.

J Med Virol 2009 Feb;81(2):258-63

Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

Chromosomal integration of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a novel situation found in a small percentage of individuals. While active HHV-6 infection is treatable using antivirals, the abnormally high level of HHV-6 DNA found in chromosomal integration of HHV-6 (CI-HHV-6) is not affected by such drugs. Stored DNA samples taken originally for detection of fusion genes and minimal residual disease from 339 pediatric patients treated for leukemia in the Czech Republic between the years 1995-2007 were tested retrospectively. Using real-time quantitative PCR technology, the quantity of HHV-6 DNA detected was normalized to 100,000 human genome equivalents as assessed by quantitation of the albumin gene. HHV-6 DNA was detected in 107 samples from 91 patients (26.8%). In the majority of samples (99) only a minute level of normalized viral copies (NVCs) (median 1.84 NVCs) was detected. A high viral load of approximately 100,000 NVCs was detected in 5 patients (1.5%; median 140,150 NVCs), in all of whom were confirmed subsequently CI-HHV-6 by a detection of HHV-6 DNA in hair follicles or in the nails. In all but one patient with HHV-6 variant B, variant A of the virus was detected. None of the patients with CI-HHV-6 had complications attributable to HHV-6 infection. The prevalence of CI-HHV-6 in childhood leukemia does not differ from that published for other patients or healthy populations. Where high levels of HHV-6 DNA are present, CI-HHV-6 should be confirmed as soon as possible so that potentially toxic but ineffective antiviral treatment can be stopped.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21371DOI Listing
February 2009

Covert preleukemia driven by MLL gene fusion.

Genes Chromosomes Cancer 2009 Jan;48(1):98-107

Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Childhood Leukaemia Investigation Prague, Charles University Prague, 2nd Medical School, Czech Republic.

Acute leukemia is considered to be a two- or multiple-step process. Although there is a considerable knowledge regarding the character of the "first hit," the nature of the "second hit" remains unanswered in most of the cases including leukemias with MLL gene rearrangement. We demonstrate here a striking sequence of events, which include a covert, protracted preleukemic phase characterized by a dominant MLL/FOXO3A clone with intact myeloid differentiation and the subsequent acquisition of a secondary genetic abnormality, leading to overt lymphoblastic leukemia. Backtracking of the secondary acute lymphoblastic leukemia (sALL) with the MLL rearrangement showed no blasts in the bone marrow (BM) during the protracted preleukemic phase. However, at the same time (more than 1 year before the sALL diagnosis) the MLL/FOXO3A was present in up to 90% of BM cells including myeloid lineage, suggesting that the fusion arose in a multipotent progenitor. To identify potential "second hit" precipitating sALL we compared DNA in preleukemic versus fully leukemic samples. The analysis revealed a 10 Mb gain on 19q13.32 in the sALL, absent in the preleukemic specimen. These data provide insight into the dynamics of leukemogenesis in secondary leukemia with MLL rearrangement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gcc.20622DOI Listing
January 2009

Prenatal origin of childhood AML occurs less frequently than in childhood ALL.

BMC Cancer 2006 Apr 21;6:100. Epub 2006 Apr 21.

CLIP-Childhood Leukaemia Investigation Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: While there is enough convincing evidence in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the data on the pre-natal origin in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are less comprehensive. Our study aimed to screen Guthrie cards (neonatal blood spots) of non-infant childhood AML and ALL patients for the presence of their respective leukemic markers.

Methods: We analysed Guthrie cards of 12 ALL patients aged 2-6 years using immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (n = 15) and/or intronic breakpoints of TEL/AML1 fusion gene (n = 3). In AML patients (n = 13, age 1-14 years) PML/RARalpha (n = 4), CBFbeta/MYH11 (n = 3), AML1/ETO (n = 2), MLL/AF6 (n = 1), MLL/AF9 (n = 1) and MLL/AF10 (n = 1) fusion genes and/or internal tandem duplication of FLT3 gene (FLT3/ITD) (n = 2) were used as clonotypic markers. Assay sensitivity determined using serial dilutions of patient DNA into the DNA of a healthy donor allowed us to detect the pre-leukemic clone in Guthrie card providing 1-3 positive cells were present in the neonatal blood spot.

Results: In 3 patients with ALL (25%) we reproducibly detected their leukemic markers (Ig/TCR n = 2; TEL/AML1 n = 1) in the Guthrie card. We did not find patient-specific molecular markers in any patient with AML.

Conclusion: In the largest cohort examined so far we used identical approach for the backtracking of non-infant childhood ALL and AML. Our data suggest that either the prenatal origin of AML is less frequent or the load of pre-leukemic cells is significantly lower at birth in AML compared to ALL cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-6-100DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1463004PMC
April 2006

Detectable minimal residual disease before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation predicts extremely poor prognosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2007 Jan;48(1):93-100

CLIP-Childhood Leukemia Investigation Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: The level of minimal residual disease (MRD) prior to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been shown to be an independent prognostic factor for outcome of pediatric patients with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Retrospective studies which used (semi-) quantitation of clone-specific immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor (Ig/TCR) rearrangements have documented the feasibility and practicality of this technique. This approach has also been disputed due to the occurrence of clonal evolution and generally high MRD levels prior to HSCT.

Procedure: In our prospective study, MRD before and after HSCT was monitored using quantitative real-time PCR in a cohort of 36 children with ALL consecutively transplanted in our center between VIII/2000 and VII/2004.

Results: In 25 of 36 patients, MRD level prior HSCT was assessed. Seventeen patients were classified as MRD-negative and eight were MRD-positive up to 9 x 10(-2). In MRD-positive subgroup, seven events (six relapses) occurred post-transplant in striking contrast to only one relapse in MRD-negative subgroup (event-free survival (EFS) log-rank P < 0.0001). MRD proved to be the only significant prognostic factor in a multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001). Adoptive immunotherapy including donor lymphocyte infusions in patients with adverse dynamics of MRD after HSCT had only limited and/or temporary effect. Clonal evolution did not present a problem precluding MRD monitoring in any of patients suffering a post-transplant relapse.

Conclusions: We show that MRD quantitation using clonal Ig/TCR rearrangements successfully assesses the risk in pediatric ALL patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. As our ability to treat detectable MRD levels after HSCT is very limited, alternative strategies for MRD-positive patients prior HSCT are necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.20794DOI Listing
January 2007

Pre-natal, clonal origin of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in triplets.

Leuk Lymphoma 2003 Dec;44(12):2099-102

CLIP--Childhood Leukaemia Investigation, Prague, Czech Republic.

A unique case of ALL in three monozygotic triplets diagnosed at the age of 24, 27 and 37 months is described. Archived bone marrow smears were available for molecular analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) and IGK genes and T-cell receptor (TCR)-delta and gamma gene rearrangements. A shared IGH rearrangement was found in triplets "A" and "B", and an identical rearrangement of TCR-delta in triplets "B" and "C". These data suggest a common, monoclonal initiation of ALL in one of these three triplets, followed by dissemination of clonal progeny to the other twins via vascular anastomoses within the single, monochorionic placenta that they shared in utero. Differences in IGH rearrangements in diagnostic samples also indicates divergent subclonal evolution of the original "pre-leukaemic" clone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1042819031000123393DOI Listing
December 2003

Slower molecular response to treatment predicts poor outcome in patients with TEL/AML1 positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: prospective real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction study.

Cancer 2003 Jan;97(1):105-13

Childhood Leukemia Investigation Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: The translocation t(12;21)(p13;q22), which produces the TEL/AML1 fusion gene, is the most frequent chromosomal abnormality in patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and generally is associated with a favorable prognosis. Furthermore, real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR)-based detection of TEL/AML1 represents an accurate technique for the reproducible assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD).

Methods: The authors employed RQ-reverse transcriptase-PCR (RQ-RT-PCR) technology to analyze MRD levels in 57 newly diagnosed patients with TEL/AML1 positive ALL in a prospective study.

Results: On Day + 33, a particularly important time point in terms of outcome prediction based on MRD monitoring, 75% of patients reached negativity, 13% of patients were positive at very low levels (< 10(-4); i.e., 1 or more leukemic cell per 10(4) normal cells), and another 13% of patients were positive at the level of 10(-2) to 10(-4) cells. No patient showed MRD levels > or = 10(-2) cells at this time. The data demonstrate that patients with TEL/AML1 positive ALL had a better response to induction chemotherapy on Day + 33 compared with a group of unselected patients with ALL (P = 0.0001). However, four patients with TEL/AML1 positive ALL developed relapse disease. Remarkably, these children were positive for MRD on Day + 33 at a level between 10(-2) cells and 10(-4) (n = 3 patients) and at < 10(-4) (n = 1 patient). Kaplan-Meier analysis of disease free survival showed the statistical significance of this distribution (MRD positive vs. MRD negative; log-rank P = 0.0016).

Conclusions: The authors conclude that, although the TEL/AML1 positive leukemias generally are associated with a favorable outcome, MRD positivity assessed by RQ-RT-PCR analysis at the end of induction therapy represents a significantly negative prognostic feature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11043DOI Listing
January 2003