Publications by authors named "Katerina Kotikova"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Efficiency of I-ioflupane SPECT as the marker of basal ganglia damage in acute methanol poisoning: 6-year prospective study.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2021 Mar 7;59(3):235-245. Epub 2020 Aug 7.

Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.

Context: Investigate whether I-ioflupane SPECT (DaT SPECT) has the potential as a marker of basal ganglia damage in acute methanol poisoning.

Methods: Prospective, single-centre, cohort study of patients with confirmed methanol poisoning was conducted. DaT SPECT was performed twice with semi-quantification using DaTQUANT and MRI-based volumetry was calculated. Specific binding ratios (SBR) of striatum, caudate nucleus, and putamen were correlated with laboratory parameters of outcome, volumetric data, and retinal nerve fibres layer (RNFL) thickness measurements.

Results: Forty-two patients (mean age 46.3 ± 4.2 years; 8 females), including 15 with MRI-detected putamen lesions (group I) and 27 patients with intact putamen (group II), underwent DaT SPECT. Volumetry was calculated in 35 of the patients assessed. SBR values for the left putamen correlated with putamen volume ( = 0.665;  < 0.001). Decreased bilateral SBR values were determined for the striatum and the putamen, but not for the nucleus caudate, in group I ( < 0.05). Significant correlation was observed between the SBR of the posterior putamen and arterial blood pH ( = 0.574;  < 0.001) and other toxicological parameters of severity of poisoning/outcome including serum lactate, glucose, and creatinine concentrations ( < 0.05). The SBR of the posterior putamen positively correlated with the global RNFL thickness ( < 0.05). ROC analysis demonstrated a significant discriminatory ability of SBR of the posterior putamen with AUC = 0.753 (95%CI 0.604-0.902;  = 0.007). The multivariate regression model demonstrated that arterial blood pH, age, and gender were the most significant factors associated with SBR of the posterior putamen.

Conclusion: DaT SPECT demonstrates significant potential for the diagnosis of methanol-induced basal ganglia damage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2020.1802033DOI Listing
March 2021

MRI-based brain volumetry and retinal optical coherence tomography as the biomarkers of outcome in acute methanol poisoning.

Neurotoxicology 2020 09 15;80:12-19. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Toxicological Information Centre, General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic; Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: Basal ganglia lesions are typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in survivors of acute methanol poisoning. However, no data are available on the association between the magnitude of damaged brain regions, serum concentrations of markers of acute methanol toxicity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the rate of retinal nerve ganglion cell loss.

Objectives: To investigate the association between MRI-based volumetry of the basal ganglia, retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and prognostic laboratory markers of outcomes in acute methanol poisoning.

Methods: MRI-based volumetry of putamen, nucleus caudatus and globus pallidus was performed and compared with laboratory parameters of severity of poisoning and acute serum markers of oxidative damage of lipids (8-isoprostan, MDA, HHE, HNE), nucleic acids (8-OHdG, 8-OHG, 5-OHMU), proteins (o-Thyr, NO-Thyr, Cl-Thyr) and leukotrienes (LTC4, LTD4, LTE4, LTB4), as well as with the results of RNFL measurements by optic coherence tomography (OCT) in 16 patients with acute methanol poisoning (Group I) and in 28 survivors of poisoning two years after discharge with the same markers measured within the follow-up examination (Group II). The control group consisted of 28 healthy subjects without methanol poisoning.

Results: The survivors of acute methanol poisoning had significantly lower volumes of basal ganglia than the controls. The patients with MRI signs of methanol-induced toxic brain damage had significantly lower volumes of basal ganglia than those without these signs. A positive correlation was found between the volume of putamen and arterial blood pH on admission (r = 0.45; p = 0.02 and r = 0.44; p = 0.02 for left and right putamen, correspondingly). A negative correlation was present between the volumes of putamen and acute serum lactate (r = -0.63; p < 0.001 and r = -0.59; p = 0.01), creatinine (r = -0.53; p = 0.01 and r = -0.47; p = 0.01) and glucose (r = -0.55; p < 0.001 and r = -0.50; p = 0.01) concentrations. The volume of basal ganglia positively correlated with acute concentrations of markers of lipoperoxidation (8-isoprostan: r = 0.61; p < 0.05 and r = 0.59; p < 0.05 for left and right putamen, correspondingly) and inflammation (leukotriene LTB4: r = 0.61; p < 0.05 and r = 0.61; p < 0.05 for left and right putamen, correspondingly). The higher the volume of the basal ganglia, the higher the thickness of the RNFL, with the strongest positive association between global RNFL and the volume of putamen bilaterally (all p < 0.01). In the follow-up markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, only o-Thyr concentration negatively correlated with the volume of putamen bilaterally (r = -0.39; p < 0.05 and r = -0.37; p < 0.05 for left and right putamen, correspondingly).

Conclusion: In survivors of acute methanol poisoning with signs of toxic brain damage, the magnitude of affected areas correlated with acute parameters of severity of poisoning, markers of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. There was a positive association between the basal ganglia volume and the thickness of RNFL, making OCT an important screening test and MRI-based volumetry the confirmative diagnostic method for the detection of CNS sequelae of methanol poisoning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2020.06.006DOI Listing
September 2020

Peripheral polyneuropathy after acute methanol poisoning: Six-year prospective cohort study.

Neurotoxicology 2020 07 5;79:67-74. Epub 2020 May 5.

Toxicological Information Centre, General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic; Department of Occupational Medicine, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: Methanol is a widely used industrial short-chain aliphatic alcohol with known neurotoxic properties. Mass poisoning outbreaks due to the consumption of methanol-adulterated alcoholic drinks present a challenge to healthcare providers due to the high mortality and serious central nervous system (CNS) damage in survivors. However, the impact of methanol exposure on the peripheral nervous system is unknown.

Objectives: To investigate the role of acute methanol exposure in the development of peripheral polyneuropathy (PNP) during the years following discharge from the hospital.

Methods: A total of 55 patients with confirmed methanol poisoning (mean age of 47.9 ± 3.6 years; 9 females) were examined 4 times within a 6-year prospective longitudinal cohort study. The program included neurological and electromyographic examinations, visual evoked potentials, ocular examinations with retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurements, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and a series of biochemical and toxicological tests.

Results: PNP was observed in 20/55 (36 %) patients, which, in most of the cases, was mild axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. In 8/55 (15 %) patients, worsening of electromyographic findings was registered during the follow-up period, including 5 cases with newly diagnosed PNP and 3 cases of PNP progression. In one subject, complete reversal of PNP was registered after cessation of alcohol intake. The patients with PNP were significantly older (57.3 ± 5.3 versus 42.5 ± 3.9 years; p < 0.001), with higher blood glucose (5.93 ± 0.97 versus 4.81 ± 0.32 mmol/L; p = 0.035) and lower vitamin B (45.5 ± 7.4 versus 57.5 ± 5.2 ug/L; p = 0.015) concentrations. The number of chronic alcohol abusers was significantly higher in the PNP group (17/20 versus 20/35; p = 0.034). No associations between PNP prevalence/ dynamics and acute parameters of poisoning severity, arterial blood pH (7.26 ± 0.07 with PNP versus 7.18 ± 0.09 without PNP; p = 0.150), or serum methanol (1320.0 ± 700.0 with PNP versus 1430.0 ± 510.0 mg/L without PNP; p = 0.813) and ethanol (460.0 ± 560.0 with PNP versus 340.0 ± 230.0 mg/L without PNP; p = 0.675) concentrations at admission were found. No difference in the number of patients with visual (9/20 with PNP versus 12/35 patients without PNP; p = 0.431) and CNS sequelae (9/20 with PNP versus 15/35 patients without PNP; p = 0.877) of poisoning was present.

Discussion: Despite the relatively high number of PNP cases, no association was found between the severity of acute methanol poisoning and the prevalence of PNP and its dynamics during six years of observation. We did not find an association between methanol-induced visual/ brain damage and the prevalence of PNP in survivors of poisoning. A high prevalence of PNP and its progression might be attributed to other causes, mainly a history of chronic alcohol abuse and insufficiently treated diabetes mellitus. Our results highlight the importance of complete cessation of alcohol consumption and better control of glycaemia in diabetic patients in the prevention and treatment of peripheral PNP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2020.04.010DOI Listing
July 2020

Health-related quality of life determinants in survivors of a mass methanol poisoning outbreak: six-year prospective cohort study.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2020 09 8;58(9):870-880. Epub 2020 Jan 8.

Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.

The effect of acute methanol poisoning on the follow-up quality of life of survivors in mass poisoning outbreaks is not known. The objective of this is to study the impact of visual and central nervous system (CNS) sequelae of methanol poisoning on long-term health-related quality of life (QoL) of survivors, its clinical determinants, and dynamics. A total of 54 patients with confirmed methanol poisoning (mean age 46.7 ± 13.4 years, 9 females) were examined consequently three times within six-year prospective cohort study and compared to 23 controls with the history of chronic alcohol abuse. The following tests were performed: SF-36 QoL questionnaire, visual evoked potentials (VEP) of optic nerve, ocular examination with retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and biochemical and toxicological tests. Acute methanol poisoning led to significant decrease in physical component summary (PCS) compared to PCS of age-adjusted controls (mean score with SD 46.8 ± 11.0 versus 52.3 ± 9.4 points;  = .003). In 17/40 (42.5%) patients with three rounds of examination, signs of severe disability (≤30 points in at least one score) were present six years after discharge, with negative dynamics of PCS score during the observation period. The patients with abnormal RNFL thickness had lower PCS (mean difference 10.5 points; 95%CI 3.5-17.5,  = .004) and mental component summary score (9.5 points; 95%CI 1.9-17.1,  = .015) compared to the patients with normal RNFL. Signs of physical and mental adaptation to long-term visual sequelae were registered with gradual reduction of difference in most of physical and mental components scores compared to the patients with normal RNFL during six years of observation. Signs of hemorrhagic brain lesions were associated with permanent decrease of PCS score (mean difference 7.4 points; 95%CI 0.6-14.0;  = .033), bodily pain (8.7 points; 95%CI 1.6-17.6;  = .018), and social functioning (8.2 points; 95%CI 3.0-17.4;  = .005) six years after discharge. No effect of type of antidote (fomepizole versus ethanol) and extracorporeal enhanced elimination modality (intermittent hemodialysis versus continuous renal replacement therapy) applied in hospital on long-term QoL was found (all  > .05). Acute methanol poisoning was associated with a significant decrease of health-related quality of life of survivors persisting for at least six years after discharge. The more pronounced decrease in QoL scores was observed in the patients with hemorrhagic brain lesions and visual sequelae of poisoning with abnormal RNFL thickness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2019.1702994DOI Listing
September 2020

The impact of co-morbidities on a 6-year survival after methanol mass poisoning outbreak: possible role of metabolic formaldehyde.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2020 04 12;58(4):241-253. Epub 2019 Jul 12.

Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.

The influence of co-morbid conditions on the outcome of acute methanol poisoning in mass poisoning outbreaks is not known. The objective of this is to study the impact of burden of co-morbidities, complications, and methanol-induced brain lesions on hospital, follow-up, and total mortality. All patients hospitalized with methanol poisoning during a mass poisoning outbreak were followed in a prospective cohort study until death or final follow-up after 6 years. The age-adjusted Charlson co-morbidity index (ACCI) score was calculated for each patient. A multivariate Cox regression model was used to calculate the adjusted hazards ratio (HR) for death. The survival was modeled using the Kaplan-Meier method. Of 108 patients (mean age with SD 50.9 ± 2.6 years), 24 (54.4 ± 5.9 years) died during hospitalization (mean survival with SD 8 ± 4 days) and 84 (49.9 ± 3.0 years;  = .159) were discharged, including 27 with methanol-induced brain lesions. Of the discharged patients, 15 (56.3 ± 6.8 years) died during the follow-up (mean survival 37 ± 11 months) and 69 (48.5 ± 3.3 years;  = .044) survived. The hospital mortality was 22%, the follow-up mortality was 18%; the total mortality was 36%. Cardiac/respiratory arrest, acute respiratory failure, multiorgan failure syndrome, and arterial hypotension increased the HR for hospital and total (but not follow-up) mortality after adjustment for age, sex, and arterial pH (all  < .05). All patients who died in the hospital had at least one complication. A higher ACCI score was associated with greater total mortality (HR 1.22; 1.00-1.48 95% CI;  = .046). Of those who died, 35 (90%) had a moderate-to-high ACCI. The Kaplan-Meier curve demonstrated that patients with a high ACCI had greater follow-up mortality compared to ones with low ( = .027) or moderate ( = .020) scores. For the patients who died during follow-up, cancers of different localizations were responsible for 7/15 (47%) of the deaths. The character and number of complications affected hospital but not follow-up mortality, while the burden of co-morbidities affected follow-up mortality. Methanol-induced brain lesions did not affect follow-up mortality. Relatively high cancer mortality rate may be associated with acute exposure to metabolic formaldehyde produced by methanol oxidation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2019.1637525DOI Listing
April 2020

Clinical and genetic determinants of chronic visual pathway changes after methanol - induced optic neuropathy: four-year follow-up study.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2019 06 17;57(6):387-397. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

a Toxicological Information Centre, Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine , Charles University and General University Hospital , Prague , Czech Republic.

Context: Methanol poisoning induces acute optic neuropathy with possible long-term visual damage.

Objective: To study the dynamics and key determinants of visual pathway functional changes during 4 years after acute methanol poisoning.

Methods: A total of 42 patients with confirmed methanol poisoning (mean age 45.7 ± 4.4 years) were examined 4.9 ± 0.6, 25.0 ± 0.6, and 49.9 ± 0.5 months after discharge. The following tests were performed: visual evoked potential (VEP), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurement, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), complete ocular examination, biochemical tests, and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotyping.

Results: Abnormal VEP P1 latency was registered in 18/42 right eyes (OD) and 21/42 left eyes (OS), abnormal N1P1 amplitude in 10/42 OD and OS. Mean P1 latency shortening during the follow-up was 15.0 ± 2.0 ms for 36/42 (86%) OD and 14.9 ± 2.4 ms for 35/42 (83%) OS, with maximum shortening up to 35.0 ms. No significant change of mean N1P1 amplitude was registered during follow-up. A further decrease in N1P1 amplitude ≥1.0 mcV in at least one eye was observed in 17 of 36 patients (47%) with measurable amplitude (mean decrease -1.11 ± 0.83 (OD)/-2.37 ± 0.66 (OS) mcV versus -0.06 ± 0.56 (OD)/-0.83 ± 0.64 (OS) mcV in the study population; both p < .001). ApoE4 allele carriers had lower global and temporal RNFL thickness and longer initial P1 latency compared to the non-carriers (all p < .05). The odds ratio for abnormal visual function was 8.92 (3.00-36.50; 95%CI) for ApoE4 allele carriers (p < .001). The presence of ApoE4 allele was further associated with brain necrotic lesions (r = 0.384; p = .013) and brain hemorrhages (r = 0.395; p = .011).

Conclusions: Improvement of optic nerve conductivity occurred in more than 80% of patients, but evoked potential amplitude tended to decrease during the 4 years of observation. ApoE4 allele carriers demonstrated lower RNFL thickness, longer P1 latency, and more frequent methanol-induced brain damage compared to non-carriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2018.1532083DOI Listing
June 2019

Neuroinflammation markers and methyl alcohol induced toxic brain damage.

Toxicol Lett 2018 Dec 4;298:60-69. Epub 2018 May 4.

Toxicological Information Centre, General University Hospital, Na Bojisti 1, 12000, Prague, Czech Republic; Department of Biomimetic Electrochemistry, J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i, Dolejskova 2155/3, 18200, Prague, Czech Republic.

Methyl alcohol intoxication is a global problem with high mortality and long-term visual sequelae and severe brain damage in survivors. The role of neuroinflammation in the mechanisms of methyl alcohol-induced toxic brain damage has not been well studied. We measured the acute concentrations and dynamics of lipoxins LxA4 and LxB4 and the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10, and IL-13 in the serum of patients treated with methyl alcohol poisoning and the follow-up concentrations in survivors two years after discharge from the hospital. A series of acute measurements was performed in 28 hospitalized patients (mean age 54.2 ± 5.2 years, mean observation time 88 ± 20 h) and the follow-up measurements were performed in 36 subjects who survived poisoning (including 12/28 survivors from the acute group). Visual evoked potentials (VEP) and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (MRI) were performed to detect long-term visual and brain sequelae of intoxication. The acute concentrations of inflammatory mediators were higher than the follow-up concentrations: LxA4, 62.0 ± 6.0 vs. 30.0 ± 5.0 pg/mL; LxB4, 64.0 ± 7.0 vs. 34.0 ± 4.0 pg/mL; IL-4, 29.0 ± 4.0 vs. 15.0 ± 1.0 pg/mL; IL-5, 30.0 ± 4.0 vs. 13.0 ± 1.0 pg/mL; IL-9, 30.0 ± 4.0 vs. 13.0 ± 1.0 pg/mL; IL-10, 38.0 ± 5.0 vs. 16.0 ± 1.0 pg/mL; IL-13, 35.0 ± 4.0 vs. 14.0 ± 1.0 pg/mL (all p < 0.001). The patients with higher follow-up IL-5 concentration had prolonged latency P1 (r = 0.413; p = 0.033) and lower amplitude N1P1 (r = -0.498; p = 0.010) of VEP. The higher follow-up IL-10 concentration was associated with MRI signs of brain necrotic damage (r = 0.533; p = 0.001) and brain hemorrhage (r = 0.396; p = 0.020). Our findings suggest that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the mechanisms of toxic brain damage in acute methyl alcohol intoxication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2018.05.001DOI Listing
December 2018

Progressive Chronic Retinal Axonal Loss Following Acute Methanol-induced Optic Neuropathy: Four-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

Am J Ophthalmol 2018 07 28;191:100-115. Epub 2018 Apr 28.

Toxicological Information Centre, Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Purpose: To study the dynamics and clinical determinants of chronic retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL) loss after methanol-induced optic neuropathy.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Methods: All patients underwent complete ophthalmic evaluation including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography 3 times during 4 years of observation: 4.9 (±0.6), 25.0 (±0.6), and 49.9 (±0.5) months after discharge.

Participants: Eighty-four eyes of 42 survivors of methanol poisoning, mean age (standard deviation) of 45.7 (±4.4) years; and 82 eyes of 41 controls, mean age 44.0 (±4.2) years.

Main Outcome Measures: Global and temporal RNFL loss.

Results: Abnormal RNFL thickness was registered in 13 of 42 (31%) survivors of methanol poisoning and chronic axonal loss in 10 of 42 (24%) patients. Significant decrease of global/temporal RNFL thickness during the observation period was found in the study population compared to the controls (P < .001). The risk estimate of chronic global RNFL loss for arterial blood pH < 7.3 at admission was 11.65 (95% confidence interval 1.91-71.12) after adjusting for age and sex. The patients with chronic axonal degeneration demonstrated progressive visual loss in 7 of 10 cases. The patients with abnormal RNFL thickness had magnetic resonance signs of brain damage in 10 of 13 vs 8 of 29 cases with normal RNFL thickness (P = .003). Signs of brain hemorrhages were present in 7 of 13 patients with abnormal RNFL thickness vs 5 of 29 cases with normal RNFL thickness (P = .015).

Conclusions: Methanol-induced optic neuropathy may lead to chronic retinal axonal loss during the following years. Arterial blood pH on admission is the strongest predictor of chronic RNFL thickness decrease. Chronic retinal neurodegeneration is associated with the progressive loss of visual functions and necrotic brain lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2018.04.015DOI Listing
July 2018

Intermittent versus continuous renal replacement therapy in acute methanol poisoning: comparison of clinical effectiveness in mass poisoning outbreaks.

Ann Intensive Care 2017 Dec 20;7(1):77. Epub 2017 Jul 20.

The Norwegian CBRNE Centre of Medicine, Department of Acute Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) is the modality of choice in the extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) of acute methanol poisoning. However, the comparative clinical effectiveness of intermittent versus continuous modalities (CRRT) is unknown. During an outbreak of mass methanol poisoning, we therefore studied the effect of IHD versus CRRT on mortality and the prevalence of visual/central nervous system (CNS) sequelae in survivors.

Methods: The study was designed as prospective observational cohort study. Patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of acute methanol poisoning were identified for the study. Exploratory factor analysis and multivariate logistic regression were applied to determine the effect of ECTR modality on the outcome.

Results: Data were obtained from 41 patients treated with IHD and 40 patients with CRRT. The follow-up time in survivors was two years. Both groups of patients were comparable by age, time to presentation, laboratory data, clinical features, and other treatment applied. The CRRT group was more acidemic (arterial blood pH 6.96 ± 0.08 vs. 7.17 ± 0.07; p < 0.001) and more severely poisoned (25/40 vs. 9/41 patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤ 8; p < 0.001). The median intensive care unit length of stay (4 (range 1-16) days vs. 4 (1-22) days; p = 0.703) and the number of patients with complications during the treatment (11/41 vs. 13/40 patients; p = 0.576) did not differ between the groups. The mortality was higher in the CRRT group (15/40 vs. 5/41; p = 0.008). The number of survivors without sequelae of poisoning was higher in the IHD group (23/41 vs. 10/40; p = 0.004). There was a significant association of ECTR modality with both mortality and the number of survivors with visual and CNS sequelae of poisoning, but this association was not present after adjustment for arterial blood pH and GCS on admission (all p > 0.05).

Conclusions: In spite of the faster correction of the acidosis and the quicker removal of the toxic metabolite in intermittent dialysis, we did not find significant differences in the treatment outcomes between the two groups after adjusting for the degree of acidemia and the severity of poisoning on admission. These findings support the strategy of "use what you have" in situations with large outbreaks and limited dialysis capacity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13613-017-0300-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5519513PMC
December 2017

Positive serum ethanol concentration on admission to hospital as the factor predictive of treatment outcome in acute methanol poisoning.

Monatsh Chem 2017 25;148(3):409-419. Epub 2016 Oct 25.

Toxicological Information Centre, General University Hospital in Prague, Na Bojisti 1, 120 00 Prague 2, Czech Republic.

Abstract: Mass methanol poisonings present a serious problem for health systems worldwide, with poor outcome associated with delayed treatment. Positive pre-hospital serum ethanol concentration may have predictive value as the prognostic factor of the treatment outcome. We studied the effect of positive serum ethanol level on admission to hospital on survival in patients treated during the Czech methanol outbreak during 2012-2014. Cross-sectional cohort study was performed in 100 hospitalized patients with confirmed methanol poisoning. Pre-hospital ethanol was administered in 42 patients (by paramedic/medical staff to 30 patients and self-administered by 12 patients before admission); 58 patients did not receive pre-hospital ethanol. Forty-two patients had detectable serum ethanol concentration on admission to hospital [median 18.3 (IQR 6.6-32.2) mmol dm]. Pre-hospital ethanol administration by paramedic/medical staff had a significant effect on survival without visual and CNS sequelae when adjusted for arterial blood pH on admission (OR 8.73; 95 % CI 3.57-21.34;  < 0.001). No patients receiving pre-hospital ethanol died compared with 21 not receiving ( < 0.001). Positive serum ethanol concentration on admission to hospital was a predictor for survival without health sequelae when adjusted for arterial blood pH (OR 8.10; 95 % CI 2.85-23.02;  < 0.001). The probability of visual and CNS sequelae in survivors reduced with increasing serum ethanol concentration on admission.

Graphical Abstract:
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00706-016-1846-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5346122PMC
October 2016

Leukotriene-mediated neuroinflammation, toxic brain damage, and neurodegeneration in acute methanol poisoning.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2017 Apr 6;55(4):249-259. Epub 2017 Feb 6.

a Department of Occupational Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine , Charles University , Prague , Czech Republic.

Context: The role of neuroinflammation in methanol-induced toxic brain damage has not been studied.

Objective: We studied acute concentrations and the dynamics of leukotrienes (LT) in serum in hospitalized patients with acute methanol poisoning and in survivors.

Methods: Series of acute cysteinyl-LT and LTB4 concentration measurements were performed in 28/101 hospitalized patients (mean observation time: 88 ± 20 h). In 36 survivors, control LT measurements were performed 2 years after discharge.

Results: The acute maximum (C) LT concentrations were higher than concentrations in survivors: C for LTC4 was 80.7 ± 5.6 versus 47.9 ± 4.5 pg/mL; for LTD4, 51.0 ± 6.6 versus 23.1 ± 2.1 pg/mL; for LTE4, 64.2 ± 6.0 versus 26.2 ± 3.9 pg/mL; for LTB4, 59.8 ± 6.2 versus 27.2 ± 1.4 pg/mL (all p < 0.001). The patients who survived had higher LT concentrations than those who died (all p < 0.01). Among survivors, patients with CNS sequelae had lower LTE4 and LTB4 than did those without sequelae (both p < 0.05). The LT concentrations increased at a rate of 0.4-0.5 pg/mL/h and peaked 4-5 days after admission. The patients with better outcomes had higher cys-LTs (all p < 0.01) and LTB4 (p < 0.05). More severely poisoned patients had lower acute LT concentrations than those with minor acidemia. The follow-up LT concentrations in survivors with and without CNS sequelae did not differ (all p > 0.05). The mean decrease in LT concentration was 30.9 ± 9.0 pg/mL for LTC4, 26.3 ± 8.6 pg/mL for LTD4, 37.3 ± 6.4 pg/mL for LTE4, and 32.0 ± 8.8 pg/mL for LTB4.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that leukotriene-mediated neuroinflammation may play an important role in the mechanisms of toxic brain damage in acute methanol poisoning in humans. Acute elevation of LT concentrations was moderate, transitory, and was not followed by chronic neuroinflammation in survivors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2017.1284332DOI Listing
April 2017

Imaging findings after methanol intoxication (cohort of 46 patients).

Neuro Endocrinol Lett 2015 ;36(8):737-44

MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic.

Objectives: Our goal is to demonstrate the variability of imaging findings, primarily in the MRI, in 46 patients who survived acute methanol poisoning. This cohort of patients is the largest such sample group examined by MRI.

Methods: Patients were examined by means of imaging methods (42 patients by MRI and 4 by CT). All had an identical protocol of MR examination (T2WI, FLAIR, T1WI with or without application of contrast medium and T2WI/FFE, DWI in the transversal plane of the scan, and with focus on the optic nerves in the coronal plane of the scan in T2WI-SPIR).

Results: Imaging methods revealed a positive finding associated with methanol intoxication in 21 patients (46%). These consisted of symmetrical lesions in the putamen--13 patients (28%), haemorrhage--13 cases (28%), deposits in white matter with localization primarily subcortically--4 cases (9%), lesions in the region of the globus pallidus--7 cases (15%) (in 6 cases without combination with the lesions in the putamen), lesions in the brainstem afflicted 6 patients (13%), and lesion in the cerebellum was found in one case. A pathological finding was found only in the patients examined by MRI.

Conclusion: Almost half of the patients who survived acute methanol poisoning had pathological findings by MRI. The most common finding concerned an affliction of the putamen, which is a predilection area. An interesting finding was the relatively frequent occurrence of selective lesion of the globus pallidus, which is more usually associated with other types of intoxication.
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July 2016

Use of Out-of-Hospital Ethanol Administration to Improve Outcome in Mass Methanol Outbreaks.

Ann Emerg Med 2016 07 11;68(1):52-61. Epub 2016 Feb 11.

Norwegian CBRNe Center of Medicine, Department of Acute Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Study Objective: Methanol poisoning outbreaks are a global public health issue, with delayed treatment causing poor outcomes. Out-of-hospital ethanol administration may improve outcome, but the difficulty of conducting research in outbreaks has meant that its effects have never been assessed. We study the effect of out-of-hospital ethanol in patients treated during a methanol outbreak in the Czech Republic between 2012 and 2014.

Methods: This was an observational case-series study of 100 hospitalized patients with confirmed methanol poisoning. Out-of-hospital ethanol as a "first aid antidote" was administered by paramedic or medical staff before the confirmation of diagnosis to 30 patients; 70 patients did not receive out-of-hospital ethanol from the staff (12 patients self-administered ethanol shortly before presentation).

Results: The state of consciousness at first contact with paramedic or medical staff, delay to admission, and serum methanol concentration were similar among groups. The median serum ethanol level on admission in the patients with out-of-hospital administration by paramedic or medical staff was 84.3 mg/dL (interquartile range 32.7 to 129.5 mg/dL). No patients with positive serum ethanol level on admission died compared with 21 with negative serum ethanol level (0% versus 36.2%). Patients receiving out-of-hospital ethanol survived without visual and central nervous system sequelae more often than those not receiving it (90.5% versus 19.0%). A positive association was present between out-of-hospital ethanol administration by paramedic or medical staff, serum ethanol concentration on admission, and both total survival and survival without sequelae of poisoning.

Conclusion: We found a positive association between out-of-hospital ethanol administration and improved clinical outcome. During mass methanol outbreaks, conscious adults with suspected poisoning should be considered for administration of out-of-hospital ethanol to reduce morbidity and mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2016.01.010DOI Listing
July 2016

Acute Methanol Poisoning: Prevalence and Predisposing Factors of Haemorrhagic and Non-Haemorrhagic Brain Lesions.

Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 2016 Aug 10;119(2):228-38. Epub 2016 Feb 10.

First Faculty of Medicine, Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicological Information Center, Charles University in Prague and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

The purpose was to study the prevalence and predisposing factors of brain lesions in survivors of acute methanol poisoning. Clinical data on 106 patients with methanol poisoning were collected during the Czech mass poisoning outbreak. Of 83 survivors, in 46 (55%) patients, follow-up examinations including magnetic resonance imaging of brain (MR) were performed 3-8 and 24-28 months after discharge from the hospital. Of 46 patients with a median age of 49 (interquartile range, 35-57) years, 24 (52%) patients had a total of 40 abnormal brain findings with haemorrhagic lesions detected in 15 (33%) and non-haemorrhagic lesions found in 9 (19%) patients. The patients with haemorrhagic brain lesions were more acidemic (lower arterial blood pH, higher base deficit) and had higher glycaemia and lactacidaemia on admission than those without haemorrhages (all p < 0.05). Thirteen of 32 (41%) of patients with systemic anticoagulation and 2 of 14 (14%) of patients without it had haemorrhagic lesions (p = 0.080). Bleeding complications during the treatment occurred in 4 of 15 (27%) patients, and 5 of 15 (33%) patients had conditions predisposing to haemorrhage in the group with haemorrhagic lesions. In three cases with a series of computer tomography (CT)/MR performed during hospitalization, the necrotic lesions in the brain remained non-haemorrhagic during hospitalization and haemorrhagic lesions were detected on the follow-up MR examinations only. No association between brain haemorrhages and systemic anticoagulation during dialysis was found: brain haemorrhages might occur in severely poisoned patients treated without systemic anticoagulation, whereas treatment with high doses of heparin might not lead to brain haemorrhages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bcpt.12559DOI Listing
August 2016

Severe Methanol Poisoning with Supralethal Serum Formate Concentration: A Case Report.

Med Princ Pract 2015 18;24(6):581-3. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicological Information Center, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and General University Hospital, Prague 2, Czech Republic.

Objective: To present a case of survival without visual and central nervous system sequelae at a formate concentration of twice the reported lethal level.

Clinical Presentation And Intervention: This was a case of a 33-year-old man who ingested 1 liter of a toxic mixture of methanol and ethanol. Upon admission, he presented with anxiety, tachycardia and hypertension and had a serum formate level of 1,400 mg/l (normal range 0.9-2.1 mg/l), a methanol level of 806 mg/l (normal range 2-30 mg/l), an undetectable ethanol concentration and a normal lactate level. A 10% solution of ethanol and folinic acid was administered intravenously and two 8-hour sessions of intermittent hemodialysis were performed. The patient was discharged on the fifth day without sequelae of poisoning. The follow-up examinations 3 months and 2 years later revealed no damage to the basal ganglia. The patient had normal visual-evoked potential and findings on optical coherence tomography. The genetic analysis revealed a rare minor allele for the gene coding CYP2E1 enzyme of the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system.

Conclusion: The patient survived acute methanol poisoning without long-term sequelae despite a high serum level of formic acid upon admission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000439350DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5588285PMC
August 2016

Long-term visual damage after acute methanol poisonings: Longitudinal cross-sectional study in 50 patients.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2015 Nov 12;53(9):884-92. Epub 2015 Sep 12.

k The Norwegian CBRNe Centre of Medicine, Department of Acute Medicine , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway.

Context: Visual disturbances due to the toxic effect of formic acid in acute methanol poisonings are generally transient. The subjective symptoms of visual toxicity may resolve within few weeks and fundoscopic signs of acute optic neuropathy subside within 1-2 months; therefore, the prevalence of long-term visual sequelae in the population of survivors of poisonings may be underestimated.

Objective: To study the prevalence and character of long-term visual sequelae of acute methanol poisonings based on the data from the Czech mass methanol outbreak in 2012.

Patients And Methods: A total of 50 patients with confirmed methanol poisoning were included in this longitudinal cross-sectional study, median age: 48 (range, 23-73) years. The following tests were performed: optical coherence tomography or OCT with evaluation of the retinal nerve fibers layer (RNFL), visual evoked potentials (VEP), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, complete ocular examination (visual acuity/field, color vision, contrast sensitivity, and fundus), neurological examinations, and biochemical tests.

Results: Of 50 patients, 7/50 (14%) were discharged with diagnosed visual sequelae and 6/50 (12%) were discharged with both visual and central nervous system sequelae of poisoning. On the follow-up examination, 20/50 (40%) of the patients had long-term visual sequelae, with 8% of blindness. A total of 38% of the patients had abnormal (28% borderline) findings on RNFL, and 40% had abnormal (18% borderline) VEP. Among the patients discharged without detected visual sequelae, 8/37 (22%) had abnormal RNFL and VEP. Patients with visual sequelae had brain lesions more often (70% vs. 27%, p < 0.01). MRI identified optic nerve lesions in 2/20 cases with abnormal VEP only. The groups with and without visual sequelae differed in serum methanol, ethanol, HCO3-, formate, pH, anion gap, and base deficit (all p < 0.01). Visual disturbances on admission and coma were more prevalent in the patients with visual sequelae (p < 0.05). Patients with positive serum ethanol on admission were 93% less likely to have optical axonal damage (OR: 0.07 (95% CI: 0.01-0.8); p < 0.05). No association was found between visual sequelae and type of antidote administered, mode of hemodialysis, or folate substitution. Pre-hospital administration of ethanol seemed beneficial: these patients were 90% less likely to have abnormal RNFL findings (OR: 0.10 (95% CI: 0.02-0.52); p < 0.01).

Conclusions: The long-term visual sequelae were clearly underestimated on discharge, suggesting a significantly higher amount of patients with long-term sequelae than earlier reported. Thorough examinations before discharge and during follow-up will likely uncover a higher morbidity also after methanol poisonings in general.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15563650.2015.1086488DOI Listing
November 2015

Czech mass methanol outbreak 2012: epidemiology, challenges and clinical features.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2014 Dec 25;52(10):1013-24. Epub 2014 Oct 25.

Department of Occupational Medicine,Toxicological Information Center, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and General University Hospital , Prague , Czech Republic.

Objectives: Methanol poisonings occur frequently globally, but reports of larger outbreaks where complete clinical and laboratory data are reported remain scarce. The objective of the present study was to report the data from the mass methanol poisoning in the Czech Republic in 2012 addressing the general epidemiology, treatment, and outcomes, and to present a protocol for the use of fomepizole ensuring that the antidote was provided to the most severely poisoned patients in the critical phase.

Methods: A combined prospective and retrospective case series study of 121 patients with confirmed methanol poisoning.

Results: From a total of 121 intoxicated subjects, 20 died outside the hospital and 101 were hospitalized. Among them, 60 survived without, and 20 with visual/CNS sequelae, whereas 21 patients died. The total and hospital mortality rates were 34% and 21%, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis found pH < 7.0 (OR 0.04 (0.01-0.16), p < 0.001), negative serum ethanol (OR 0.08 (0.02-0.37), p < 0.001), and coma on admission (OR 29.4 (10.2-84.6), p < 0.001) to be the only independent parameters predicting death. Continuous hemodialysis was used more often than intermittent hemodialysis, but there was no significant difference in mortality rate between the two [29% (n = 45) vs 17% (n = 30), p = 0.23]. Due to limited stockpiles of fomepizole, ethanol was administered more often; no difference in mortality rate was found between the two [16% (n = 70) vs. 24% (n = 21), p = 0.39]. The effect of folate administration both on the mortality rate and on the probability of visual sequelae was not significant (both p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Severity of metabolic acidosis, state of consciousness, and serum ethanol on admission were the only significant parameters associated with mortality. The type of dialysis or antidote did not appear to affect mortality. Recommendations that were issued for hospital triage of fomepizole administration allowed conservation of valuable antidote in this massive poisoning outbreak for those patients most in need.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15563650.2014.974106DOI Listing
December 2014
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