Publications by authors named "Kate Payne"

27 Publications

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The development of a current events and dialogue forum at a large U.S. academic medical center.

Perspect Med Educ 2021 Jan 29. Epub 2021 Jan 29.

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

Background: The Vanderbilt Community Circle (VC2) was designed to provide all faculty, staff, and students within the entire Vanderbilt University Medical Center community a dedicated venue to discuss current events and ongoing societal issues.

Approach: During the 2017-18 academic year, four VC2 events were held on: "Race, identity, and conflict in America," "Gun violence in America," "Gender in the workplace," and "Immigration in America." Facilitators guided participants to share their views and perspectives on these matters with pre-developed open-ended questions. Attendees started discussions in small groups and then eventually combined into a large one. Pre- and post-event surveys were administered to measure the program's effectiveness.

Evaluation: One-hundred and twenty-four participants were included, 75 of whom completed both the pre- and post-event surveys. Sixty-four of the 75 (85%) agreed or strongly agreed that "multiple perspectives and opinions were represented" and 73% felt that their "own perspective was broadened on the issue." Most (89%) believed that the format and setting of the event was conducive to dialogue and discussion, and almost all (91%) reported that they would attend a similar event in the future. Groningen Reflection Ability Scale scores were high before (94 [25th-75th: 88-99]) and remained high after the events (93 [25th-75th: 88-93.3], p > 0.05).

Reflection: We successfully implemented a medical center-wide, recurring current events and dialogue forum in hopes of increasing reflection, unity, and understanding across our own community.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40037-021-00651-2DOI Listing
January 2021

Assessing and addressing practitioner burnout: Results from an advanced practice registered nurse health and well-being study.

J Am Assoc Nurse Pract 2019 Nov 5;33(1):38-48. Epub 2019 Nov 5.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Background: Numerous nursing and physician studies have reported the effects of workload, environment, and life circumstances contributing to burnout. Effects may include job dissatisfaction, poor quality of life, and associated negative patient outcomes. Although assessing clinician burnout to determine effective interventions has become a topic of great importance, there are minimal studies specific to advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs).

Purpose: This single-center study was conducted to assess the prevalence and impact of APRN burnout and to recommend targeted interventions toward improvement of overall health and well-being.

Methods: A cross-sectional, mixed methods design was used. The voluntary, anonymous survey examined perceptions of wellness, inclusion, social support, personal coping mechanisms, and status of burnout.

Results: The 78-question survey was sent to 1,014 APRNs (94%) and PAs (6%), with a 43.6% response rate (n = 433); 76.4% were nurse practitioners. Participants were identified as currently experiencing burnout, formerly burned out, or never having experienced burnout. Profiles were developed, and similarities and differences between each group were compared. Of 433 respondents, 40.4% (n = 175) reported having never experienced burnout, 33.3% (n = 144) reported they had formerly experienced burnout, and 26.3% (n = 114) reported they were currently experiencing burnout.

Implications For Practice: The results of the study identified that some APRNs report experiencing burnout at different times in their careers. Recommendations by participants to mitigate burnout included self-care, organizational promotion of health and well-being, career development, and leadership support. This study is one of the first to report on burnout among APRNs and potential interventions to build resilience; however, additional research is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JXX.0000000000000324DOI Listing
November 2019

When Only Family Is Available to Interpret.

Pediatrics 2019 04 8;143(4). Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

When caring for patients and families who do not speak English, medical interpreters are necessary. Sometimes, our patients' families speak languages or dialects for which no in-person or video or phone interpreter can be found. If a family member is bilingual, the members of the medical team must make a difficult choice. Is it better to use a family member as translator or to not be able to communicate at all? In this article, we present the case of a critically ill patient with complicated pathophysiology whose family speaks a rare Guatemalan dialect for which no medical interpreters can be identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-3700DOI Listing
April 2019

Outside/Inside/Outside.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Am J Bioeth 2018 06;18(6):54-55

a Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15265161.2018.1461466DOI Listing
June 2018

Nursing and Ethical Commitments.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse Spring 2017;80(1)

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June 2018

Nursing and Ethical Commitments.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse Spring 2017;80(1)

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June 2018

Lead with Ethics.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse Fall 2016;79(3):11

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June 2018

Especially a Nurse: Find Power in your Practice.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2016 ;79(2):13

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September 2016

Relationships, Community, and Hospitality in Nursing.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2016 ;79(1):13

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June 2016

Disaster Prevention.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2015 ;78(4):15

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March 2016

Essential Virtues in Nursing.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse Winter 2016;79(4):11

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June 2018

Facilitators of prenatal care in an exemplar urban clinic.

Women Birth 2016 Apr 31;29(2):160-7. Epub 2015 Oct 31.

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, 461 21st Ave South, Nashville, TN 37240, United States.

Background: Perinatal outcomes have complex causes that include biologic, maternal, structural, and societal components. We studied one urban nurse-led clinic serving women at risk for poor perinatal outcomes with superior pre-term birth rates (4%) when compared with the surrounding county (11.2%).

Aim: To explore women's perspectives of their interface with the clinic, staff, and providers to understand this exemplary model.

Methods: A qualitative descriptive approach with semi-structured interviews as the primary data source. Participants (n=50) were recruited from an urban clinic in the Southeast United States designed to serve women of low socio-economic status or who are recent immigrants.

Findings: Women greatly valued a personal connection with the nurse-midwives and staff, and felt this resulted in high-quality care. Convenient appointment times and the lack of wait for initial or subsequent appointments made care accessible. Participants reported the relaxed and helpful approach and attitudes of the office staff were essential components of their positive experience. Women valued unrushed visits to ask questions and receive information. In addition, participants felt that clinic staff were easy to reach.

Conclusion: While qualitative data cannot demonstrate causation, this study provides support that a compassionate and personalized approach to care motivates women to access needed services in pregnancy. Clinic staff are an essential component of the access process. Women overcame barriers to obtain personalized, culturally appropriate care provided by kind, competent practitioners. Clinic staff and practitioners should develop a connection with each woman by providing care that meets her physical, cultural, and personal needs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2015.09.007DOI Listing
April 2016

Facilitators of prenatal care in an exemplar urban clinic.

Women Birth 2016 Apr 31;29(2):160-7. Epub 2015 Oct 31.

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, 461 21st Ave South, Nashville, TN 37240, United States.

Background: Perinatal outcomes have complex causes that include biologic, maternal, structural, and societal components. We studied one urban nurse-led clinic serving women at risk for poor perinatal outcomes with superior pre-term birth rates (4%) when compared with the surrounding county (11.2%).

Aim: To explore women's perspectives of their interface with the clinic, staff, and providers to understand this exemplary model.

Methods: A qualitative descriptive approach with semi-structured interviews as the primary data source. Participants (n=50) were recruited from an urban clinic in the Southeast United States designed to serve women of low socio-economic status or who are recent immigrants.

Findings: Women greatly valued a personal connection with the nurse-midwives and staff, and felt this resulted in high-quality care. Convenient appointment times and the lack of wait for initial or subsequent appointments made care accessible. Participants reported the relaxed and helpful approach and attitudes of the office staff were essential components of their positive experience. Women valued unrushed visits to ask questions and receive information. In addition, participants felt that clinic staff were easy to reach.

Conclusion: While qualitative data cannot demonstrate causation, this study provides support that a compassionate and personalized approach to care motivates women to access needed services in pregnancy. Clinic staff are an essential component of the access process. Women overcame barriers to obtain personalized, culturally appropriate care provided by kind, competent practitioners. Clinic staff and practitioners should develop a connection with each woman by providing care that meets her physical, cultural, and personal needs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2015.09.007DOI Listing
April 2016

Finding Refuge in Nursing: The Role of Ethics.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2015 ;78(2):14

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July 2015

Summer to do list: living up to trust.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2011 ;74(2)

Saint Thomas Hospital, Nashville, USA.

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September 2011

Ethics empowerment: deal with moral distress.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2011 ;74(1):1, 4

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July 2011

To err is human.

Tenn Nurse 2010 ;73(4)

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February 2011

Science, healing, and courage: the legacy of Florence Nightingale.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Ala Nurse 2010 Sep-Nov;37(3):10

Saint Thomas Hospital.

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December 2010

Science, healing, and courage: the legacy of Florence Nightingale.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2010 ;73(2)

Saint Thomas Hospital, USA.

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August 2010

Promises to keep: ethical obligations at the end of life.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2010 ;73(1)

Saint Thomas Hospital, Nashville, USA.

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May 2010

Justifiable deception in everyday practice.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2010 Apr 11;125(4):939-41. Epub 2010 Mar 11.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2009.12.988DOI Listing
April 2010

Ethics column. Working through an ethical dilemma.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2009 ;72(2):1, 10

Saint Thomas Hospital, Nashville, USA.

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September 2009

Advocate for advance medical directives.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2009 ;72(1):1, 6

Saint Thomas Hospital, Nashville, USA.

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September 2009

Ethics and pandemic planning.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2008 ;71(4):1, 9

Saint Thomas Hospital, Nashville, USA.

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March 2009

Ask the nurse ethicist.

Authors:
Kate Payne

Tenn Nurse 2008 ;71(3):1, 4

Saint Thomas Hospital, Nashville, TN, USA.

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December 2008

Ethical issues related to pandemic flu planning and response.

Authors:
Kate Payne

AACN Adv Crit Care 2007 Oct-Dec;18(4):356-60

Saint Thomas Health System, 4220 Harding Rd, Nashville, TN 37205, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.AACN.0000298627.07535.76DOI Listing
January 2008

Quality of dying and death in two medical ICUs: perceptions of family and clinicians.

Chest 2005 May;127(5):1775-83

Division of Healthcare Policy and Research, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO 80011, USA.

Objective: We compared perceptions of the quality of dying and death in the ICU across nurses, resident physicians, attending physicians, and family members. The aim was to obtain a surrogate assessment of the quality of the dying process and examine differences in the perceptions of different types of raters.

Design: Cross-sectional survey of family members and ICU clinicians conducted following the death of enrolled patients.

Setting: Two medical ICUs at academic tertiary care medical centers.

Patients: Patients dying in the ICU (n = 68).

Measurements And Results: The previously validated Quality of Dying and Death (QODD) instrument was modified for use in the ICU. Within 48 h of the time of death, the nurse, resident, and attending physician caring for the patient were asked to complete the QODD. One month following the death, a designated family member was contacted and the QODD was administered on the telephone. Family members and attending physicians gave the most favorable ratings of death, while nurses and residents provided less favorable ratings. Significant differences between these groups were notable (p < 0.01) on items related to patient autonomy: maintaining dignity, being touched by loved ones, and the overall quality of death.

Conclusions: The perception of dying and death in the ICU varies considerably between nurses, attending physicians, resident physicians, and family members. Further studies are needed to explain these differences and determine the utility of the ICU QODD instrument for assessing and improving the quality of end-of-life care in the ICU.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.127.5.1775DOI Listing
May 2005
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