Publications by authors named "Kate Newman"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Remote medico-legal assessment by telephone during COVID-19: Monitoring safety and quality when documenting evidence of torture for UK asylum applicants.

Torture 2021 ;31(1):37-52

Freedom from Torture, United Kingdom Correspondence to org.

Introduction: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Freedom from Torture developed remote telephone assessments to provide interim medico-legal reports, ensuring people could obtain medical evidence to support their asylum claim.

Method: To audit this new way of working, feedback was collected from the doctors, interpreters, individuals being assessed, and senior medical and legal staff who reviewed the reports. This paper presents findings from the first 20 assessments.

Results: Individuals assessed reported that the doctor developed good rapport, but in 35% of assessments reported that there were some experiences they felt unable to disclose. In 70% of assessments, doctors felt that rapport was not as good compared to face-to-face. In the majority of assessments, doctors were unable to gain a full account of the torture or its impact. They reported feeling cautious about pressing for more information on the telephone, mindful of individuals' vulnerability and the difficulty of providing support remotely. Nevertheless, in 85% of assessments doctors felt able to assess the consistency of the account of torture with the psychological findings, in accordance with the Istanbul Protocol (United Nations, 2004). Factors that hindered the assessment included the inability to observe body language, the person's ill health, and confidentiality concerns.

Conclusion: This research indicates that psychological medico-legal reports can safely be produced by telephone assessment, but are more likely to be incomplete in terms of both full disclosure of torture experiences and psychological assessment. The limitations underline the need for a follow-up face-to-face assessment to expand the psychological assessment as well as undertake a physical assessment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7146/torture.v31i1.121832DOI Listing
October 2021

An Exploratory Study Using Visual Thinking Strategies to Improve Undergraduate Students' Observational Skills.

Am J Pharm Educ 2020 04;84(4):7600

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, School of Pharmacy, Edwardsville, Illinois.

To describe a teaching approach that incorporated visual thinking strategies (VTS) into an existing health humanities course and measure the effects on the observation skills of undergraduate health professions students. Visual thinking strategies were used to introduce students to a variety of health-related topics. Each week a facilitated 15-minute discussion was held about a work of art related to the day's topic. Pre- and post-course assessments were administered in which students were shown three images and asked to describe what they observed in each image. Student responses were evaluated using deductive content analysis with two different categorization matrices. The assessments also included six Likert-style questions. For matrix one, the most frequent type of observation was naming or identifying something. Growth between pre- and post-course assessments occurred in the following categories: what is happening, how it looks, and where it is located. The number of student observations for two of the three images increased. The majority of students indicated that the use of this visual art exercise was an enjoyable learning experience. In future studies, a larger sample size and inclusion of a control group could better demonstrate the meaningful impact of VTS on developing students' observational skills.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7223938PMC
April 2020

PharmD graduates' perceptions of the impact of a teaching specialization.

Curr Pharm Teach Learn 2019 07 23;11(7):678-685. Epub 2019 Mar 23.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Dental Medicine, Alton, IL 62002, United States. Electronic address:

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate graduates' perceptions of the impact of a teaching (education) specialization and identify aspects of the specialization that could be enhanced.

Methods: A 20-item online survey was emailed to graduates of the education specialization at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Regression analysis was used to examine (1) association between overall self-rated competence on abilities and skills as a teacher and the number of types of teaching experiences and (2) association between overall self-rated competence on abilities and skills as a teacher and history of holding a faculty position. Chi square was used to determine differences between the two cohorts in confidence areas.

Results: Fifty-six out of 69 alumni (81.2%) responded to the survey. Graduates reported high levels of confidence in most teaching abilities. There was a high level of agreement that the specialization enhanced motivation to teach. Regression analysis indicated statistically significant associations between self-rated competence on abilities and skills across a variety of teaching experiences (e.g., classroom lecturing, precepting, continuing education, staff training, lab instruction, facilitating small groups) and history of faculty employment. Enhanced skills in experiential education and teaching outside of academia were identified as further areas for development.

Conclusion: The education specialization offered at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy may be an alternative entry level PharmD pathway for stimulating interest in academia. The majority of graduates agreed that they have applied the knowledge and skills to their careers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cptl.2019.03.003DOI Listing
July 2019

Essential Elements for Core Required Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

Am J Pharm Educ 2019 05;83(4):6865

Medical University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Charleston, South Carolina.

ince 2004, concerns and calls for greater quality assurance in experiential education have been published. The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) "Standards 2016" provide limited differentiation across the four required practice experiences, and, as such, schools interpret them differently. Both schools and accreditation site visit teams would benefit from a common set of guidance for the required Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs), so that they can ensure consistency and quality in student experiences across practice sites. To address this need for greater standardization, a taskforce of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Experiential Education (EE) Section conducted a peer-reviewed, consensus-building process, including experiential faculty and staff across multiple colleges and schools of pharmacy, to determine a common set of elements that could be used to bring consistency to the experiences and expectations for student learning in practice. Over a two year period, the taskforce reviewed the relevant literature and then drafted and revised the elements through an iterative process which allowed for established EE consortia and members of the EE section to review the draft and provide input for revision. The resulting essential elements presented here can be used to guide faculty and staff within experiential education programs in their quality assurance processes in ensuring students receive consistent experience as part of their education prior to graduation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6865DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6581360PMC
May 2019

A course for developing interprofessional skills in pre-professional honor students using humanities and media.

Curr Pharm Teach Learn 2017 09 13;9(5):874-880. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, United States. Electronic address:

Background And Purpose: To design and implement an undergraduate honors course for pre-health professional students that develops interpersonal skills through use of a variety of humanities.

Educational Activity And Setting: A three credit hour course in an honors seminar sequence was developed by pharmacy practice faculty and with input from faculty in mass communications, philosophy, applied communication studies and history. The course utilized a variety of media such as literature, film, and podcasts to foster student discussion about a variety of health-related topics. Topics included public health, stigmatization, portrayals of health care providers, patient experiences, health care ethics, aging, and death and dying. Students were assessed using pre-class assignments and reflective writings as well as a formal written and oral presentation on a selected health-related book. A quasi-experimental design was used to assess the impact of the course on desired course outcomes.

Findings: The first course offering was to 22 undergraduate pre-health professional honors students. Pre- and post-course surveys on students' perceptions and students' reflective writings revealed achievement of desired course outcomes. Post-course evaluations also revealed positive perceptions about the course.

Discussion: The design of this course provided an outlet for students to read and enjoy various forms of media, while also meeting its goal of exposing students to a variety of humanities. The course allowed students to think critically about various health care issues, and to begin to develop interpersonal skills.

Summary: The course could be adapted for pharmacy by developing affective domains of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cptl.2017.05.004DOI Listing
September 2017

Advancing Interprofessional Education via Strategic Planning.

Am J Pharm Educ 2016 May;80(4):56

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5688/ajpe80456DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4891854PMC
May 2016

Sedation levels during propofol administration for outpatient colonoscopies.

Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent) 2014 Jan;27(1):12-5

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas (Ramsay, Jacobson, Richardson, Brown, Hein), Baylor Research Institute (Newman, Rogers), and the Department of Quantitative Sciences, Baylor Health Care System (De Vol, Daoud), Dallas, Texas.

The levels of sedation required for patients to comfortably undergo colonoscopy with propofol were examined. One hundred patients undergoing colonoscopy with propofol were enrolled. In addition to standard-of-care monitoring, sedation level was monitored with the Patient State Index (PSI) obtained from a brain function monitor, transcutaneous carbon dioxide (tcpCO2) was monitored with the TCM TOSCA monitor, and end-tidal carbon dioxide was monitored via nasal cannula. The Ramsay Sedation Score (RSS) was also assessed and recorded. After baseline data were obtained from the first 40 consecutive patients enrolled in the study, the remaining 60 patients were randomized into two groups. In one group the PSI value was blinded from the anesthesiologist and in the second group the PSI was visible and the impact of this information on the management of the sedation was analyzed. Overall 96% of patients reached levels of deep sedation and 89% reached levels of general anesthesia. When comparing the blinded to PSI versus unblinded groups, the blinded group had a significantly lower PSI and higher RSS and tcpCO2, indicating the blinded group was maintained at a deeper sedation level with more respiratory compromise than the unblinded group. Patients undergoing colonoscopy under propofol sedation delivered by a bolus technique are frequently taken to levels of general anesthesia and are at risk for respiratory depression, airway obstruction, and hemodynamic compromise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08998280.2014.11929037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3862122PMC
January 2014

Dexmedetomidine infusion for analgesia up to 48 hours after lung surgery performed by lateral thoracotomy.

Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent) 2014 Jan;27(1):3-10

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas (Ramsay, Leeper, Hamman, Hebeler, Henry, Kourlis, Wood, Stecher, Hein) and Baylor Research Institute (Newman), Dallas, Texas.

Patients undergoing a lateral thoracotomy for pulmonary resection have moderate to severe pain postoperatively that is often treated with opioids. Opioid side effects such as respiratory depression can be devastating in patients with already compromised respiratory function. This prospective double-blinded clinical trial examined the analgesic effects and safety of a dexmedetomidine infusion for postthoracotomy patients when administered on a telemetry nursing floor, 24 to 48 hours after surgery, to determine if the drug's known early opioid-sparing properties were maintained. Thirty-eight thoracotomy patients were administered dexmedetomidine intraoperatively and overnight postoperatively and then randomized to receive placebo or dexmedetomidine titrated from 0.1 to 0.5 μg·kg·h(-1) the day following surgery for up to 24 hours on a telemetry floor. Opioids via a patient-controlled analgesia pump were available for both groups, and vital signs including transcutaneous carbon dioxide, pulse oximetry, respiratory rate, and pain and sedation scores were monitored. The dexmedetomidine group used 41% less opioids but achieved pain scores equal to those of the placebo group. The mean heart rate and systolic blood pressure were lower in the dexmedetomidine group but sedation scores were better. The mean respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were similar in the two groups. Mild hypercarbia occurred in both groups, but periods of significant respiratory depression were noted only in the placebo group. Significant hypotension was noted in one patient in the dexmedetomidine group in conjunction with concomitant administration of a beta-blocker agent. The placebo group reported a higher number of opioid-related adverse events. In conclusion, the known opioid-sparing properties of dexmedetomidine in the immediate postoperative period are maintained over 48 hours.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08998280.2014.11929035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3862121PMC
January 2014
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