Publications by authors named "Kasemsak Jandee"

8 Publications

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Relationship of anthropometric measurements with glycated hemoglobin and 1-h blood glucose after 50 g glucose challenge test in pregnant women: A longitudinal cohort study in Southern Thailand.

J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2022 Mar 8. Epub 2022 Mar 8.

Obstetrics and Gynecology Division, Naradhiwas Rajanagarindra Hospital, Narathiwat, Thailand.

Aims: To assess correlations of anthropometric measurements with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and 1-h blood glucose after a 50 g glucose challenge test during the first and late second trimesters and explore their relationships of anthropometric measurements with neonatal birth weight.

Methods: A longitudinal study was conducted among pregnant Thai women with gestational age ≤14 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, using body mass index, body compositions, and circumferences, and skinfold thickness, were measured at four-time points: ≤14, 18-22, 24-28, and 30-34 weeks of gestation. HbA1c and 1-h blood glucose were examined at ≤14 and 24-28 weeks. Neonatal birth weight was recorded.

Results: Of 312 women, HbA1c was more correlated with anthropometric measurements during pregnancy than 1-h blood glucose. At 24-28 weeks, women with high/very high body fat percentage were more likely to have higher HbA1c. Women with high subscapular skinfold thickness were more likely to have higher 1-h blood glucose at ≤14 and 24-28 weeks. High hip circumference significantly increased neonatal birth weights.

Conclusion: Anthropometric measurements were longitudinally correlated with HbA1c and 1-h blood glucose, higher in the late second than first trimesters, as well as neonatal birth weight. The mechanisms to explain the relationship of different anthropometric measurements are required to be further studied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jog.15213DOI Listing
March 2022

A model for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus in early pregnancy: a prospective study in Thailand.

Obstet Gynecol Sci 2022 Mar 26;65(2):156-165. Epub 2022 Jan 26.

Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand.

Objective: To develop a predictive model using the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and construct a predictive nomogram for GDM risk in women during early pregnancy.

Methods: A prospective study was conducted in two tertiary hospitals among pregnant women with gestational age ≤14 weeks. Early GDM was diagnosed if an abnormal 100 g oral glucose tolerance test was detected using the Carpenter and Coustan criteria after an abnormal 50 g glucose challenge test. The factors included in the model were ACOG risk factors; maternal age; family history of hypertensive disorder in pregnancy; family history of dyslipidemia; gravida; parity; histories of preterm birth, early fetal death, abortion, stillbirth, and low birth weight; and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The predictive models for early GDM were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analyses. The nomograms were constructed, and their discrimination ability and predictive accuracy were tested.

Results: Of the 553 pregnant women, 54 (9.8%) were diagnosed with early GDM. In the integrated model, there was a history of GDM (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.82-14.63; P=0.004), HbA1c threshold ≥5.3% (aOR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.44-4.74; P=0.002), and family history of dyslipidemia (aOR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.37-5.21; P=0.005). The integrated nomogram model showed that a history of GDM had a high impact on the risk of early GDM. Its discrimination and mean absolute error were 0.76 and 0.009, respectively.

Conclusion: Application of the predictive model and nomogram will help healthcare providers investigate the probability of early GDM, especially in resource-limited countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5468/ogs.21250DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8942750PMC
March 2022

Diagnostic Yield of High-resolution Esophageal Manometry With Chicago Classification Version 3.0 in Thai Patients.

J Neurogastroenterol Motil 2021 Oct;27(4):533-539

School of Public Health, Walailak University, Tha Sala, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand.

Background/aims: High-resolution manometry with the Chicago classification scheme has been introduced in clinical practice as a gold standard for esophageal motility test. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic yield of high-resolution manometry in Thai patients.

Methods: All available high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) studies performed during the study period were retrospectively reviewed and interpreted according to the Chicago classification version 3.0. The main esophageal symptoms and coexisting factors were correlated with the HREM findings.

Results: Of the 201 patients, nearly half (49.8%) were documented to have dysphagia. The second most common condition was refractory reflux symptoms (17.4%). More than 70.0% of dysphagia patients showed abnormal esophageal motility, contrary to globus patients who mostly had normal test findings (65.4%). Dysphagia still was the most often correlated condition with major esophageal motility disorders (88.7%), particularly the elderly patients who have coexisting weight loss. Endoscopic and/or surgical procedures were revealed for the highest rate among patients with dysphagia but no one in the globus group needed this intervention. The sensitivity and specificity of dysphagia for major esophageal motility disorders were 70.0% and 67.0%. A much lower sensitivity and higher specificity were found in other non-dysphagia symptoms, especially nausea/vomiting or belching (3.0% or 89.0%). The highest positive likelihood ratio (2.10) to detect major abnormalities was also observed in dysphagia.

Conclusion: Esophageal manometry provided the highest yield in dysphagia; it was not a strongly beneficial test in patients presenting with nondysphagia to identify clinically relevant esophageal motor disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5056/jnm20088DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8521467PMC
October 2021

Correlations of spot urinary sodium and potassium with blood pressure in pregnant women: A longitudinal study in Southern Thailand.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2021 May 2;153(2):239-247. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Obstetrics and Gynecology Division, Naradhiwas Rajanagarindra Hospital, Narathiwat, Thailand.

Objective: To assess the changes of spot urinary sodium and potassium and blood pressure (BP) throughout pregnancy and their correlations in southern Thailand.

Methods: A longitudinal study was conducted in southern Thailand from March 2018 to November 2019. Spot urinary excretion of sodium per creatinine (U[Na ]/[Cr]), potassium per creatinine (U[K ]/[Cr]) and U[Na ]/[K ] ratios, and BP were measured at four time points throughout pregnancy. A one-way analysis of variance with repeated measures and Bonferroni correction with post hoc analysis was used to identify significant differences between time points. The correlations were measured using Pearson's correlation coefficients.

Results: A total of 327 pregnant women were included. Both systolic and diastolic BPs decreased gradually from up to 14 weeks of pregnancy to 18-22 weeks and then increased until 30-34 weeks. Mean spot U[Na ]/[Cr] ratios did not significantly change during the study period. Mean spot U[K ]/[Cr] ratios gradually increased, and spot U[Na ]/[K ] ratios gradually decreased. The correlation of spot U[Na ]/[Cr] and U[K ]/[Cr] ratios with BPs was weakly negative at all four time points.

Conclusions: Spot U[Na ]/[Cr] and U[K ]/[Cr] ratios are inversely correlated with BPs; weak correlations are found among pregnant women in southern Thailand. Further research in different populations is required to confirm its correlation and broader use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijgo.13404DOI Listing
May 2021

Effectiveness of Implementation of Electronic Malaria Information System as the National Malaria Surveillance System in Thailand.

JMIR Public Health Surveill 2016 Jan-Jun;2(1):e20. Epub 2016 May 6.

Department of Tropical Hygiene (Biomedical and Health Informatics)Faculty of Tropical MedicineMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand.

Background: In moving toward malaria elimination, one strategy is to implement an active surveillance system for effective case management. Thailand has developed and implemented the electronic Malaria Information System (eMIS) capturing individualized electronic records of suspected or confirmed malaria cases.

Objective: The main purpose of this study was to determine how well the eMIS improves the quality of Thailand's malaria surveillance system. In particular, the focus of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the eMIS in terms of the system users' perception and the system outcomes (ie, quality of data) regarding the management of malaria patients.

Methods: A mixed-methods technique was used with the framework based on system effectiveness attributes: data quality, timeliness, simplicity, acceptability, flexibility, stability, and usefulness. Three methods were utilized: data records review, survey of system users, and in-depth interviews with key stakeholders. From the two highest endemic provinces, paper forms matching electronic records of 4455 noninfected and 784 malaria-infected cases were reviewed. Web-based anonymous questionnaires were distributed to all 129 eMIS data entry staff throughout Thailand, and semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 management-level officers.

Results: The eMIS is well accepted by system users at both management and operational levels. The data quality has enabled malaria personnel to perform more effective prevention and control activities. There is evidence of practices resulting in inconsistencies and logical errors in data reporting. Critical data elements were mostly completed, except for a few related to certain dates and area classifications. Timeliness in reporting a case to the system was acceptable with a delay of 3-4 days. The evaluation of quantitative and qualitative data confirmed that the eMIS has high levels of simplicity, acceptability, stability, and flexibility.

Conclusions: Overall, the system implemented has achieved its objective. The results of the study suggested that the eMIS helps improve the quality of Thailand's malaria surveillance system. As the national malaria surveillance system, the eMIS's functionalities have provided the malaria staff working at the point of care with close-to-real-time case management data quality, covering case detection, case investigation, drug compliance, and follow-up visits. Such features has led to an improvement in the quality of the malaria control program; the government officials now have quicker access to both individual and aggregated data to promptly react to possible outbreak. The eMIS thus plays one of the key roles in moving toward the national goal of malaria elimination by the next decade.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/publichealth.5347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4869224PMC
May 2016

Effectiveness of Using Mobile Phone Image Capture for Collecting Secondary Data: A Case Study on Immunization History Data Among Children in Remote Areas of Thailand.

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2015 Jul 20;3(3):e75. Epub 2015 Jul 20.

Center of Excellence for Biomedical and Public Health Informatics (BIOPHICS), Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Entering data onto paper-based forms, then digitizing them, is a traditional data-management method that might result in poor data quality, especially when the secondary data are incomplete, illegible, or missing. Transcription errors from source documents to case report forms (CRFs) are common, and subsequently the errors pass from the CRFs to the electronic database.

Objective: This study aimed to demonstrate the usefulness and to evaluate the effectiveness of mobile phone camera applications in capturing health-related data, aiming for data quality and completeness as compared to current routine practices exercised by government officials.

Methods: In this study, the concept of "data entry via phone image capture" (DEPIC) was introduced and developed to capture data directly from source documents. This case study was based on immunization history data recorded in a mother and child health (MCH) logbook. The MCH logbooks (kept by parents) were updated whenever parents brought their children to health care facilities for immunization. Traditionally, health providers are supposed to key in duplicate information of the immunization history of each child; both on the MCH logbook, which is returned to the parents, and on the individual immunization history card, which is kept at the health care unit to be subsequently entered into the electronic health care information system (HCIS). In this study, DEPIC utilized the photographic functionality of mobile phones to capture images of all immunization-history records on logbook pages and to transcribe these records directly into the database using a data-entry screen corresponding to logbook data records. DEPIC data were then compared with HCIS data-points for quality, completeness, and consistency.

Results: As a proof-of-concept, DEPIC captured immunization history records of 363 ethnic children living in remote areas from their MCH logbooks. Comparison of the 2 databases, DEPIC versus HCIS, revealed differences in the percentage of completeness and consistency of immunization history records. Comparing the records of each logbook in the DEPIC and HCIS databases, 17.3% (63/363) of children had complete immunization history records in the DEPIC database, but no complete records were reported in the HCIS database. Regarding the individual's actual vaccination dates, comparison of records taken from MCH logbook and those in the HCIS found that 24.2% (88/363) of the children's records were absolutely inconsistent. In addition, statistics derived from the DEPIC records showed a higher immunization coverage and much more compliance to immunization schedule by age group when compared to records derived from the HCIS database.

Conclusions: DEPIC, or the concept of collecting data via image capture directly from their primary sources, has proven to be a useful data collection method in terms of completeness and consistency. In this study, DEPIC was implemented in data collection of a single survey. The DEPIC concept, however, can be easily applied in other types of survey research, for example, collecting data on changes or trends based on image evidence over time. With its image evidence and audit trail features, DEPIC has the potential for being used even in clinical studies since it could generate improved data integrity and more reliable statistics for use in both health care and research settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.4183DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4527008PMC
July 2015

Application of mobile technology for improving expanded program on immunization among highland minority and stateless populations in northern Thailand border.

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2015 Jan 14;3(1):e4. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

Center of Excellence for Biomedical and Public Health Informatics (BIOPHICS), Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Studies of undervaccinated children of minority/stateless populations have highlighted significant barriers at individual, community, and state levels. These include geography-related difficulties, poverty, and social norms/beliefs.

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess project outcomes regarding immunization coverage, as well as maternal attitudes and practices toward immunization.

Methods: The "StatelessVac" project was conducted in Thailand-Myanmar-Laos border areas using cell phone-based mechanisms to increase immunization coverage by incorporating phone-to-phone information sharing for both identification and prevention. With limitation of the study among vulnerable populations in low-resource settings, the pre/post assessments without comparison group were conducted. Immunization coverage was collected from routine monthly reports while behavior-change outcomes were from repeat surveys.

Results: This study revealed potential benefits of the initiative for case identification; immunization coverage showed an improved trend. Prevention strategies were successfully integrated into the routine health care workflows of immunization activities at point-of-care. A behavior-change-communication package contributes significantly in raising both concern and awareness in relation to child care.

Conclusions: The mobile technology has proven to be an effective mechanism in improving a children's immunization program among these hard-to-reach populations. Part of the intervention has now been revised for use at health centers across the country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.3704DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4319147PMC
January 2015

Customized-Language Voice Survey on Mobile Devices for Text and Image Data Collection Among Ethnic Groups in Thailand: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2014 Mar 6;2(1):e7. Epub 2014 Mar 6.

Center of Excellence for Biomedical and Public Health Informatics (BIOPHICS), Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Public health surveys are often conducted using paper-based questionnaires. However, many problems are associated with this method, especially when collecting data among ethnic groups who speak a different language from the survey interviewer. The process can be time-consuming and there is the risk of missing important data due to incomplete surveys.

Objective: This study was conducted as a proof-of-concept to develop a new electronic tool for data collection, and compare it with standard paper-based questionnaire surveys using the research setting of assessing Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) toward the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) among 6 ethnic groups in Chiang Rai Province, Thailand. The two data collection methods were compared on data quality in terms of data completeness and time consumed in collecting the information. In addition, the initiative assessed the participants' satisfaction toward the use of a smartphone customized-language voice-based questionnaire in terms of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness.

Methods: Following a cross-over design, all study participants were interviewed using two data collection methods after a one-week washout period. Questions in the paper-based questionnaires in Thai language were translated to each ethnic language by the interviewer/translator when interviewing the study participant. The customized-language voice-based questionnaires were programmed to a smartphone tablet in six, selectable dialect languages and used by the trained interviewer when approaching participants.

Results: The study revealed positive data quality outcomes when using the smartphone, voice-based questionnaire survey compared with the paper-based questionnaire survey, both in terms of data completeness and time consumed in data collection process. Since the smartphone questionnaire survey was programmed to ask questions in sequence, no data was missing and there were no entry errors. Participants had positive attitudes toward answering the smartphone questionnaire; 69% (48/70) reported they understood the questions easily, 71% (50/70) found it convenient, and 66% (46/70) reported a reduced time in data collection. The smartphone data collection method was acceptable by both the interviewers and by the study participants of different ethnicities.

Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that the application of specific features of mobile devices like smartphone tablets (including dropdown choices, capturing pictures, and voiced questions) can be successfully used for data collection. The mobile device can be effectively used for capturing photos of secondary data and collecting primary data with customized-language and voiced questionnaire survey. Using smartphone questionnaires can minimize or eliminate missing data and reduce the time consumed during the data collection process. Smartphone customized-language, voice-based questionnaires for data collection can be an alternative and better approach than standard translated paper-based questionnaires for public health surveys, especially when collecting data among ethnic and hard-to-reach groups residing in multilanguage-speaking settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.3058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4114448PMC
March 2014
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