Publications by authors named "Kasım Zafer Yuksel"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pregabalin Does Not Cause Midline Closure Defects But It Is Not As Innocent As Thought.

Turk Neurosurg 2020 Dec 10. Epub 2020 Dec 10.

Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Kahramanmaraş, Turkey.

Aim: Pregabalin binds specifically to α2-δ subunits of voltage gated Ca++ channels. Tissues which are rich in these subunits are the target for possible effects and side effects of Pregabalin. The effect of Pregabalin used during pregnancy was investigated on chicken embryo model against causing neural tube closure defect and other potential effects on other organ systems which are rich in α2-δ subunits.

Material And Methods: Fertilized chicken eggs were divided in to groups and different doses of pregabalin was administered. All embryos were harvested in the 8th day of incubation and investigated both macroscopically and microscopically against any developmental malformations caused by Pregabalin.

Results: Macroscopically not any malformations were detected but macrosomia was statistically significant in medium and high dose groups. Microscopically, vertebral lamina ossification was delayed in some embryos in high dose group but not interpreted as midline closure defect and also not statistically significant. Decrease in the number of renal glomerulus and increase in the tubular damage was statistically significant in medium and high dose groups. Cardiomegaly was also found in some embryos in middle and high dose groups but not statistically significant.

Conclusion: The use of Pregabalin does not cause neural tube closure defect in the embryo unless not exceed recommended maximum dose. Causing macrosomia instead of developmental retardation by Pregabalin is in conflict with the literature. This study revealed that Pregabalin causes fetal nephrotoxicity and macrosomia. These findings indicate that the use of Pregabalin in pregnancy still needs to be accounted as suspicious.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.30907-20.1DOI Listing
December 2020

An uncommon case mimicking cervical trauma: Os odontoideum.

Turk J Emerg Med 2017 Mar 18;17(1):22-24. Epub 2016 Aug 18.

Department of Neurosurgery, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Medical Faculty, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

Os odontoideum is a separate odontoid process from the body of the axis. It is the most common anomaly of the odontoid process. Patients with this condition can be asymptomatic or present with a wide range of neurological dysfunctions. It may cause cervical instability, atlantoaxial dislocation and myelopathy. This anomaly can mimic Type I and II odontoid fractures. There is a role for conservative treatment of an asymptomatic incidentally found, radiologically stable and non-compressive os odontoideum. However, surgical treatment has a definitive role in symptomatic cases. In this study, the case is presented of a 31 year-old male patient with neck pain who was diagnosed with incidental os odontoideum. The diagnosis of acute odontoid fracture was discarded in this case as the radiological findings were of a characteristic cortex with smooth contours, and there was no history of recent trauma, sclerosis or hypertrophy of the anterior tubercle of the atlas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tjem.2016.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5357087PMC
March 2017

Impact of Position on Efficacy of Caudal Epidural Injection for Low Back Pain and Radicular Leg Pain Due to Central Spinal Stenosis and Lumbar Disc Hernia.

J Korean Neurosurg Soc 2017 Mar 1;60(2):205-210. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Department of Neurosurgery, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Medical Faculty, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

Objective: This study was performed to evaluate and compare the efficacies of caudal epidural injections performed at prone and lateral decubitus positions.

Methods: A total of 120 patients suffering from low back pain and radicular leg pain were included and patients were randomly distributed into 2 groups according to the position during injection. In Group 1 (n=60; 32 women, 28 men), caudal epidural injection was performed at prone position, whereas it was implemented at lateral decubitus position in Group 2 (n=60; 33 women, 27 men). Visual analogue scale, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), walking tolerance (WT) and standing tolerance (ST) were compared in 2 groups before and after injection.

Results: In Group 1, ODI values were higher at 30th minute (=0.007), 3rd week (=0.043) and 6th month (=0.013). In Group 1, ODI, VAS and ST values were improved significantly at all follow-up periods compared to initial values. In Group 1, WT scores were better than initial values at 30th minute, 3rd week and 3rd month. In Group 2, ODI scores at 30th minute, 3rd week, 3rd month and 6th month were improved while VAS and ST scores were improved at all periods after injection. WT scores were better at 30th minute, 3rd week and 3rd month compared to initial WT scores.

Conclusion: Our results indicated that application of injection procedure at lateral decubitus position allowing a more concentrated local distribution may provide better relief of pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3340/jkns.2016.0405.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5365291PMC
March 2017

Histopathological Analysis of Ligamentum Flavum in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Disc Herniation.

Asian Spine J 2017 Feb 17;11(1):71-74. Epub 2017 Feb 17.

Department of Neurosurgery, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Medical Faculty, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

Study Design: Histopathological analyses were performed in ligamentum flavum (LF) hypertrophy patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and lumbar disc herniation (LDH).

Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate histopathological changes in LF patients with LSS and LDH.

Overview Of Literature: LSS is the most common spinal disorder in elderly patients. This condition causes lower back and leg pain and paresis, and occurs as a result of degenerative changes in the lumbar spine, including bulging of the intervertebral discs, bony proliferation of the facet joints, and LF thickening; among these, LF thickening is considered a major contributor to the development of LSS.

Methods: A total of 71 patients operated with the surgical indications of LSS and LDH were included. LF samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic degenerative LSS (stenotic group) and from 40 patients who underwent lumbar discectomy for LDH (discectomy group). LF materials were examined histopathologically, and other specimens were examined for collagen content, elastic fiber number and array, and presence of calcification.

Results: The stenotic and discectomy groups did not differ with regard to mean collagen concentration or mean elastic fiber number (p=0.430 and p=0.457, respectively). Mean elastic fiber alignment was 2.36±0.99 in the stenotic group and 1.38±0.54 in the discectomy group (<0.001). Mean calcification was 0.39±0.50 in the stenotic group, whereas calcification was not detected (0.00±0.00) in the discectomy group; a statistically significant difference was detected (<0.001) between groups.

Conclusions: LF hypertrophy in spinal stenosis may occur as a result of elastic fiber misalignment along with the development of calcification over time. Further studies determining the pathogenesis of LSS are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4184/asj.2017.11.1.71DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5326735PMC
February 2017

Lumbar herniated disc: spontaneous regression.

Korean J Pain 2017 Jan 30;30(1):44-50. Epub 2016 Dec 30.

Department of Neurosurgery, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Medical Faculty, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

Background: Low back pain is a frequent condition that results in substantial disability and causes admission of patients to neurosurgery clinics. To evaluate and present the therapeutic outcomes in lumbar disc hernia (LDH) patients treated by means of a conservative approach, consisting of bed rest and medical therapy.

Methods: This retrospective cohort was carried out in the neurosurgery departments of hospitals in Kahramanmaraş city and 23 patients diagnosed with LDH at the levels of L3-L4, L4-L5 or L5-S1 were enrolled.

Results: The average age was 38.4 ± 8.0 and the chief complaint was low back pain and sciatica radiating to one or both lower extremities. Conservative treatment was administered. Neurological examination findings, durations of treatment and intervals until symptomatic recovery were recorded. Laségue tests and neurosensory examination revealed that mild neurological deficits existed in 16 of our patients. Previously, 5 patients had received physiotherapy and 7 patients had been on medical treatment. The number of patients with LDH at the level of L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 were 1, 13, and 9, respectively. All patients reported that they had benefit from medical treatment and bed rest, and radiologic improvement was observed simultaneously on MRI scans. The average duration until symptomatic recovery and/or regression of LDH symptoms was 13.6 ± 5.4 months (range: 5-22).

Conclusions: It should be kept in mind that lumbar disc hernias could regress with medical treatment and rest without surgery, and there should be an awareness that these patients could recover radiologically. This condition must be taken into account during decision making for surgical intervention in LDH patients devoid of indications for emergent surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3344/kjp.2017.30.1.44DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5256262PMC
January 2017

Ankylosing Spondylitis: Patterns of Spinal Injury and Treatment Outcomes.

Asian Spine J 2016 Aug 16;10(4):655-62. Epub 2016 Aug 16.

Neurosurgery Department, Medical Faculty, Kahramanmaraş Sütcü Imam University, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

Study Design: Retrospective review.

Purpose: We retrospectively reviewed our patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to identify their patterns of spinal fractures to help clarify management strategies and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with this group of patients.

Overview Of Literature: Because of the brittleness of bone and long autofused spinal segments in AS, spinal fractures are common even after minor trauma and often associated with overt instability.

Methods: Between January 1, 1998 and March 2011, 30 patients (23 males, 7 females; mean age, 70.43 years; range, 45 to 95 years) with the radiographic diagnosis of AS of the spinal column had 42 fractures. Eight patients presented with significant trauma, 17 after falls, and 5 after minor falls or no recorded trauma. Eleven patients presented with a neurological injury, ranging from mild sensory loss to quadriplegia.

Results: There were 16 compression and 10 transverse fractures, two Jefferson's fractures, one type II and two type III odontoid process fractures, and five fractures of the posterior spinal elements (including lamina and/or facet, three spinous process fractures, three transverse process fractures). Twenty-four fractures affected the craniocervical junction and/or cervical vertebrae, 17 were thoracic, and one involved the lumbar spine. The most affected vertebrae were C6 and T10. The mean follow-up was 29.9 months. One patient was lost to follow-up. Eighteen patients were treated conservatively with bed rest and bracing. Twelve patients underwent surgery for spinal stabilization either with an anterior, posterior or combined approach.

Conclusions: Nonsurgical treatment can be considered especially in the elderly patients with AS and spinal trauma but without instability or major neurological deficits. The nonfusion rate in conservatively treated patients is low. When treatment is selected for patients with spinal fractures and AS, the pattern of injury must be considered and the need for individualized treatment is paramount.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4184/asj.2016.10.4.655DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4995247PMC
August 2016

Impact of Magnetic Field on Pressures of Programmable Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts: An Experimental Study.

Turk Neurosurg 2017 ;27(6):935-941

Sutcu Imam University, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurosurgery, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

Aim: To investigate whether programmable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts are influenced by exposure to the magnetic field and to compare the effects of magnetic field in 4 different brands of programmable CSF shunts.

Material And Methods: This experimental study was performed in the laboratory using a novel design of magnetic field. Four types of programmable CSF shunts (Miethke®, Medtronic®, Sophysa® and Codman®Hakim®) were exposed to the magnetic field generated by an apparatus consisting of Helmholtz coil for 5 minutes. In every CSF shunt, initial pressures were adjusted to 110 mm H2O and pressures after exposure to magnetic field were noted. These measurements were implemented at frequencies of 5 Hz, 20 Hz, 30 Hz, 40 Hz, 60 Hz and 80 Hz. In each type, three shunts were utilized and evaluations were made twice for every shunt.

Results: At 5, 30, 40 and 60 Hz, Groups 1, 2 and 3 had significantly higher average pressures than Group 4. At 20 and 80 Hz, Groups 1 and 2 had notably different pressure values than Groups 3 and 4. Group 3 displayed the highest pressure, while Group 4 demonstrated the lowest pressure.

Conclusion: Exposure to magnetic fields may affect the pressures of programmable CSF shunts. However, further controlled, clinical trials are warranted to elucidate the in-vivo effects of magnetic field exposure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.16795-15.2DOI Listing
May 2018

Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress in Patients With Modic Changes: Preliminary Controlled Study.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2015 Jul;40(14):1101-7

Departments of *Biochemistry, and †Brain and Nerve Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

Study Design: Oxidative/nitrosative stress in vertebral endplates of patients with low back pain and Modic changes (MCs) (types I, II, and III) endplate changes on magnetic resonance imaging.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the levels of oxidative/nitrosative stress biomarkers in patients with MCs.

Summary Of Background Data: Degenerated discs and endplate abnormalities is postulated as a possible source of low back pain. Oxidative/nitrosative stress plays an important the role in various human diseases. However, the presence of oxidative/nitrosative stress has not been studied in patients with low back pain and endplate changes on magnetic resonance imaging.

Methods: Patients with MCI, II, and III (n = 32) and age- and sex-matched controls subjects (n = 15) were enrolled in this study. Also, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and nitric oxide levels as nitrosative stress biomarkers were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Also, the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) as oxidative stress biomarkers were determined on spectrophotometer.

Results: Oxidative/nitrosative stress was confirmed by the significant elevation in nitric oxide, 3-NT, MDA and decreased of CAT and SOD activities in MCI compared with other MCs and the control group (P < 0.05). The highest CAT and SOD activities were found in patients with MCII compared with the other MCs and the control group. However, the levels of nitric oxide, 3-NT, and MDA showed moderate increase in this group (P < 0.05). In addition, the levels of nitrosative stress biomarkers in patients with MCIII were approximated to the control values (P > 0.05). However, the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with MCIII were slightly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Our findings indicated that oxidative/nitrosative stress in patients with MCI may be aggravated as a result of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance and it may cause formation of the lesion in these patients. However, the increased antioxidant activities and MDA, 3-NT levels in patients with MCII and MCIII may be an adaptative response to against oxidative/nitrosative stress.

Level Of Evidence: 4.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000000737DOI Listing
July 2015

Medicinal plant extract (Ankaferd Blood Stopper) application in deep tissue injuries in rats: histopathological investigation of the effect on regional and systemic tissues.

Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg 2013 Jan;19(1):1-7

Department of Emergency Medicine, Sütçü İmam University Faculty of Medicine, Kahramanmaraş, Turkey.

Background: This study was planned to evaluate both the histopathological changes under light microscope as well as the systemic organ effects following application of Ankaferd Blood Stopper® (ABS) (a mixture of five plant extracts) in an animal model of deep tissue hemorrhage.

Methods: A total of 50 Wistar Albino rats were divided into five groups of 10 rats each. The rats underwent femoral vein puncture and were treated with ABS tampon, ABS spray, or Surgicel, and one group was left untreated. After two weeks, each group underwent partial tissue excision from the same femoral region as well as from the brain, heart, kidney, and liver.

Results: The specimens from all groups were obtained from the femoral region after two weeks and evaluated under light microscope. The light microscope revealed no histopathological changes in neurovascular structures or in deep connective tissues in any of the groups.

Conclusion: ABS provided hemostasis and was observed to stop bleeding. There were no histopathological changes at the tissue level and no pathological effects in other organs tissues under light microscope, and the remote organ tissue remained clear.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5505/tjtes.2013.65642DOI Listing
January 2013

Biomechanics of Cervical "Skip" Corpectomy Versus Standard Multilevel Corpectomy.

Clin Spine Surg 2017 04;30(3):E152-E161

*Department of Neurosurgery, Lütfi Kirdar Kartal Teaching and Research Hospital, Istanbul †Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Faculty, Kahramanmaraş Sütcü Imam University, Kahramanmaras, Turkey ‡Spinal Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery Research §Division of Neurological Surgery, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ.

Study Design: In vitro biomechanical study of flexibility with finite-element simulation to estimate screw stresses.

Objective: To compare cervical spinal stability after a standard plated 3-level corpectomy with stability after a plated 3-level "skip" corpectomy where the middle vertebra is left intact (ie, two 1-level corpectomies), and to quantify pullout forces acting on the screws during various loading modes.

Summary Of Background Data: Clinically, 3-level cervical plated corpectomy has a high rate of failure, partially because only 4 contact points affix the plate to the upper and lower intact vertebrae. Leaving the intermediate vertebral body intact for additional fixation points may overcome this problem while still allowing dural sac decompression.

Methods: Quasistatic nonconstraining torque (maximum 1 N m) induced flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation while angular motion was recorded stereophotogrammetrically. Specimens were tested intact and after corpectomy with standard plated and strut-grafted 3-level corpectomy (7 specimens) or "skip" corpectomy (7 specimens). Screw stresses were quantified using a validated finite-element model of C3-C7 mimicking experimentally tested groups. Skip corpectomy with C5 screws omitted was also simulated.

Results: Plated skip corpectomy tended to be more stable than plated standard corpectomy, but the difference was not significant. Compared with standard plated corpectomy, plated skip corpectomy reduced peak screw pullout force during axial rotation (mode of loading of highest peak force) by 15% (4-screw attachment) and 19% (6-screw attachment).

Conclusions: Skip corpectomy is a good alternative to standard 3-level corpectomy to improve stability, especially during lateral bending. Under pure moment loading, the screws of a cervical multilevel plate experience the highest pullout forces during axial rotation. Thus, limiting this movement in patients undergoing plated multilevel corpectomy may be reasonable, especially until solid fusion is achieved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BSD.0b013e318268d30aDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3549310PMC
April 2017

The effect of posterior bridging of C-1 on craniovertebral junction surgery.

J Neurosurg Spine 2006 Jul;5(1):50-2

Department of Neurosurgery, Anatomy, Orthopaedics, and Family Medicine, Kahramanmaras Sutcuimam University Medical School, Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

Object: The groove for the vertebral artery (VA) may be bridged on C-1, forming a canal through which the artery passes. Because this variant may significantly affect the commonly performed C-1 posterior laminectomy, the authors studied the incidence and radiological appearance of this anatomical feature in surgical specimens.

Methods: Anatomical measurements were performed using a Vernier caliper (accurate to 0.1 mm) on 166 dry C-1 vertebrae. In addition, a convenience sample of 172 cervical x-ray films was evaluated. Partial osseous bridging was detected in eight (4.8%), and a complete osseous bridge, forming the canalis arteriae vertebralis (canal for the VA), was seen unilaterally (eight on the left and two on the right) in 10 (6%) and bilaterally in eight (4.8%) of the dry vertebrae. On lateral radiography, a complete bone bridge was observed on nine (5.2%) and a partial bridge on 10 (5.8%) of the 172 studies.

Conclusions: The discovery of a common variant may necessitate an immediate change in surgical management, and this anomaly could even increase the rate of surgery-related complications. The VA canal, present in the C-1 vertebra in approximately 5% of the specimens evaluated, was a variant that may be protective against VA injury. Knowledge of this variant may help the surgeon undertaking procedures in the C-1 region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/spi.2006.5.1.50DOI Listing
July 2006