Publications by authors named "Karen Myers"

10 Publications

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Self-Preservation in the Workplace: The Importance of Well-Being for Social Work Practitioners and Field Supervisors.

Soc Work 2019 12;65(1):74-81

The risks in the human services workplace to social workers' emotional, psychological, and physical well-being is well known. Self-care is seen as a way to minimize workplace risks, including burnout, compassion fatigue, secondary traumatic stress, and vicarious traumatization. This article examines the reported self-care practices of social work practitioners and their agencies, and the barriers that get in the way. Forty-two participants worked in agency settings and supervised students. All reported engaging in some type of self-care practice, and almost all reported some type of support from their workplace; however, 38 reported barriers to self-care. Even with self-care practices in place personally and in the workplace, obstacles remain. Social work educators need to be cognizant of these factors to ensure that field supervisors are well supported in their own self-care practices and are equipped to assist students in developing these positive practices early in their careers to help sustain workers in the social work profession.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sw/swz040DOI Listing
December 2019

Yoga as Sanctuary: A Valuable Mind-Body Intervention for the Lesbian Community.

Authors:
Karen Myers

Int J Yoga Therap 2017 Nov;27(1):15-24

Assistant Professor, Department of Social Work, James Madison University.

Poetic autoethnography provides a research methodology to explore yoga as a mind-body intervention that creates sanctuary. Using this qualitative method and retrieving data from my personal journals, daily workout journals, experiences as a lesbian-identified participant in yoga classes, and yoga instructor, I turn the research lens on myself in order to examine my sociological life story. At a critical time in my life when I was struggling with the fragmentation, anxiety, and despair resulting from dealing with homophobia in a heteronormative world, yoga provided sanctuary for me. My yoga practice increased my self-efficacy, providing transferable techniques for finding refuge within myself, irrespective of the adversity I was facing in my life. Places of sanctuary are critical for members of minority groups who often face marginalization and oppression, which compromise their well-being.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17761/1531-2054-27.1.15DOI Listing
November 2017

Medical Residents' and Practicing Physicians' e-Cigarette Knowledge and Patient Screening Activities: Do They Differ?

Health Serv Res Manag Epidemiol 2016 Jan-Dec;3:2333392816678493. Epub 2016 Nov 28.

Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine, Florida State University College of Medicine in Tallahassee, Tallahassee, FL, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare medical residents and practicing physicians in primary care specialties regarding their knowledge and beliefs about electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). We wanted to ascertain whether years removed from medical school had an effect on screening practices, recommendations given to patients, and the types of informational sources utilized.

Methods: A statewide sample of Florida primary care medical residents (n = 61) and practicing physicians (n = 53) completed either an online or paper survey, measuring patient screening and physician recommendations, beliefs, and knowledge related to e-cigarettes. χ tests of association and linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the differences within- and between-participant groups.

Results: Practicing physicians were more likely than medical residents to believe e-cigarettes lower cancer risk in patients who use them as an alternative to cigarettes ( = .0003). Medical residents were more likely to receive information about e-cigarettes from colleagues ( = .0001). No statistically significant differences were observed related to e-cigarette knowledge or patient recommendations.

Conclusions: Practicing primary care physicians are accepting both the benefits and costs associated with e-cigarettes, while medical residents in primary care are more reticent. Targeted education concerning the potential health risks and benefits associated with the use of e-cigarettes needs to be included in the current medical education curriculum and medical provider training to improve provider confidence in discussing issues surrounding the use of this product.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2333392816678493DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5266463PMC
November 2016

Excellence and evidence in staffing: a data-driven model for excellence in staffing (2nd edition).

Nurs Econ 2014 May-Jun;32(3 Suppl):3-35

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA, 2010) and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM, 2011) Future of Nursing report have prompted changes in the U.S. health care system. This has also stimulated a new direction of thinking for the profession of nursing. New payment and priority structures, where value is placed ahead of volume in care, will start to define our health system in new and unknown ways for years. One thing we all know for sure: we cannot afford the same inefficient models and systems of care of yesterday any longer. The Data-Driven Model for Excellence in Staffing was created as the organizing framework to lead the development of best practices for nurse staffing across the continuum through research and innovation. Regardless of the setting, nurses must integrate multiple concepts with the value of professional nursing to create new care and staffing models. Traditional models demonstrate that nurses are a commodity. If the profession is to make any significant changes in nurse staffing, it is through the articulation of the value of our professional practice within the overall health care environment. This position paper is organized around the concepts from the Data-Driven Model for Excellence in Staffing. The main concepts are: Core Concept 1: Users and Patients of Health Care, Core Concept 2: Providers of Health Care, Core Concept 3: Environment of Care, Core Concept 4: Delivery of Care, Core Concept 5: Quality, Safety, and Outcomes of Care. This position paper provides a comprehensive view of those concepts and components, why those concepts and components are important in this new era of nurse staffing, and a 3-year challenge that will push the nursing profession forward in all settings across the care continuum. There are decades of research supporting various changes to nurse staffing. Yet little has been done to move that research into practice and operations. While the primary goal of this position paper is to generate research and innovative thinking about nurse staffing across all health care settings, a second goal is to stimulate additional publications. This includes a goal of at least 20 articles in Nursing Economic$ on best practices in staffing and care models from across the continuum over the next 3 years.
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September 2014

Evaluation of a standardized hourly rounding process (SHaRP).

J Healthc Qual 2014 Mar-Apr;36(2):62-9. Epub 2012 Dec 13.

Current research suggests that hourly rounds on hospitalized patients may be associated with improvements in care delivery and in the patients' perception of care, as well as a reduction in patient safety events. Implementing an hourly rounding protocol involves a major change in nursing staff workflow and a substantial training and education program to ensure the success of the program. This quasi-experimental study aimed to determine if a standardized hourly rounding process (SHaRP), implemented through a formal education program, would result in improved efficiency, quality, safety, and patient satisfaction metrics when compared to a less standardized process introduced through the traditional train-the-trainer method. Data were collected over a 6-month period and results were trended for an additional 6 months later to determine if significant gains were sustained over time. Significant reductions in call light use during the study period (p = .001) and the number of steps taken by the day-shift staff (p = .02) were seen on the intervention unit. Differences in the number of patient falls, 30-day readmission rates, and patients' perception of care were not statistically significant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1945-1474.2012.00222.xDOI Listing
April 2015

One-way valved speech bulb obturator using a tracheoesophageal prosthesis.

J Prosthodont 2012 Dec 4;21(8):634-7. Epub 2012 Jul 4.

Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, TX, USA.

This article describes the fabrication procedures to create a one-way valved speech bulb obturator.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-849X.2012.00894.xDOI Listing
December 2012

Millennials in the Workplace: A Communication Perspective on Millennials' Organizational Relationships and Performance.

J Bus Psychol 2010 Jun 5;25(2):225-238. Epub 2010 Mar 5.

Stereotypes about Millennials, born between 1979 and 1994, depict them as self-centered, unmotivated, disrespectful, and disloyal, contributing to widespread concern about how communication with Millennials will affect organizations and how they will develop relationships with other organizational members. We review these purported characteristics, as well as Millennials' more positive qualities-they work well in teams, are motivated to have an impact on their organizations, favor open and frequent communication with their supervisors, and are at ease with communication technologies. We discuss Millennials' communicated values and expectations and their potential effect on coworkers, as well as how workplace interaction may change Millennials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10869-010-9172-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2868990PMC
June 2010

Domestic violence.

Authors:
Karen E Myers

Am J Nurs 2009 Sep;109(9):12

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NAJ.0000360290.00184.a0DOI Listing
September 2009

Vocal fold immobility following burn intensive care.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2007 Jul;137(1):152-6

Department of Otolaryngology, Brooke Army Medical Center, FT Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA.

Objective: To evaluate factors associated with the development of vocal fold immobility in patients surviving burn intensive care.

Study Design And Setting: A retrospective review of patients referred to Department of Speech Pathology by the Burn Intensive Care Unit between June 2002 and November 2004. Patients underwent videostroboscopic examination, and associations of vocal fold immobility with factors related to patient management were examined by using logistic regression.

Results: Vocal fold immobility was diagnosed in 25 (48%) of the 52 patients evaluated. A significant association with a history of intubation during overseas aeromedical evacuation (odds ratio 4.5, P = 0.026) was observed. Multivariate modeling demonstrated an increased risk of 3% for each % total body surface area (TBSA) of burn.

Conclusion: High-altitude transport of intubated patients was a significant risk factor in the development of laryngeal injury.

Significance: This study magnifies the role that endotracheal tube cuff pressure may play in recurrent laryngeal nerve injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2007.03.024DOI Listing
July 2007

Conservative treatment of an obstructing vocal fold granuloma.

Ear Nose Throat J 2003 Aug;82(8):550

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Brook Army Medical Center, Ft. Sam Houston, Tex., USA.

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August 2003