Publications by authors named "Karen L Parker"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Intersectionality in Public Health Research: A View From the National Institutes of Health.

Am J Public Health 2021 01;111(1):95-97

Jennifer Alvidrez is with the Division of Extramural Scientific Programs, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. Gregory L. Greenwood is with the Division of AIDS Research, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health. Tamara Lewis Johnson is with the Office of Disparities Research and Workforce Diversity, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health. Karen L. Parker is with the Sexual & Gender Minority Research Office, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305986DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7750592PMC
January 2021

Concept Analysis: Health-Promoting Behaviors Related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Infection.

Nurs Forum 2015 Apr-Jun;50(2):75-82. Epub 2014 Jun 17.

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.

Problem: The concept of health-promoting behaviors incorporates ideas presented in the Ottawa Charter of Public Health and the nursing-based Health Promotion Model. Despite the fact that the concept of health-promoting behaviors has a nursing influence, literature suggests nursing has inadequately developed and used this concept within nursing practice. A further review of literature regarding health promotion behaviors and the human papilloma virus suggest a distinct gap in nursing literature.

Method: This article presents a concept analysis of health-promoting behaviors related to the human papilloma virus in order to encourage the application of the concept into nursing practice, promote continued nursing research regarding this concept, and further expand the application of health-promoting behaviors to other situations and populations within the nursing discipline.

Conclusion: Attributes of health-promoting behaviors are presented and include empowerment, participation, community, and a positive concept of health. Antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents are also presented, as are model, borderline, and contrary cases to help clarify the concept. Recommendations for human papilloma virus health-promoting behaviors within the nursing practice are also provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nuf.12094DOI Listing
January 2016

The road less traveled.

Nurs Manage 2013 Feb;44(2):26-31

Meadville Medical Center, Meadville, Pa., USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NUMA.0000426138.83656.a9DOI Listing
February 2013

Bcl-2 overexpression ameliorates immune complex-mediated arthritis by altering FcγRIIb expression and monocyte homeostasis.

J Leukoc Biol 2013 Apr 22;93(4):585-97. Epub 2013 Jan 22.

The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia.

RA is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by accumulation of inflammatory cells within synovial joints. RA is associated with a failure of apoptosis of infiltrating leukocytes, thought to be a result of overexpression of prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. Overexpression of Bcl-2 in hematopoietic cells can result in spontaneous autoimmunity. We therefore hypothesized that increased Bcl-2 in the hematopoietic compartment would reduce apoptosis and thereby, exacerbate inflammatory arthritis. Paradoxically, we found that overexpression of Bcl-2 in mice (vav-bcl-2) markedly reduced pathology in antibody-dependent models of RA (CIA and K/BxN serum transfer arthritis). No such protection was observed in a model of CD4(+) T cell-dependent, B cell-independent arthritis (mBSA/IL-1-induced arthritis). In CIA, vav-bcl-2 Tg mice had lower antibody production to CII, which might explain reduced disease. However, Bcl-2 overexpression also reduced passive K/BxN serum transfer arthritis. Overexpression of Bcl-2 caused a monocytosis, with preferential expansion of Ly6C(lo) monocytes and increased expression of the inhibitory receptor for IgG, FcγRIIb, on leukocytes. Skewing of the myeloid cell population, increases in FcγRIIb, and reduced arthritis were independent of the hypergammaglobulinemia found in vav-bcl-2 Tg mice. These data reveal selective effects of the Bcl-2-regulated apoptotic pathway on monocyte differentiation and the expression of FcRs critical for regulation of antibody/immune complex-mediated disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1189/jlb.0412190DOI Listing
April 2013

Stress-induced co-expression of alternative respiratory chain components in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Plant Mol Biol 2005 May;58(2):193-212

Plant Molecular Biology Group, School of Biomedical and Chemical Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia.

Plant mitochondria contain non-phosphorylating bypasses of the respiratory chain, catalysed by the alternative oxidase (AOX) and alternative NADH dehydrogenases (NDH), as well as uncoupling (UCP) protein. Each of these components either circumvents or short-circuits proton translocation pathways, and each is encoded by a small gene family in Arabidopsis. Whole genome microarray experiments were performed with suspension cell cultures to examine the effects of various 3 h treatments designed to induce abiotic stress. The expression of over 60 genes encoding components of the classical, phosphorylating respiratory chain and tricarboxylic acid cycle remained largely constant when cells were subjected to a broad range of abiotic stresses, but expression of the alternative components responded differentially to the various treatments. In detailed time-course quantitative PCR analysis, specific members of both AOX and NDH gene families displayed coordinated responses to treatments. In particular, the co-expression of AOX1a and NDB2 observed under a number of treatments suggested co-regulation that may be directed by common sequence elements arranged hierarchically in the upstream promoter regions of these genes. A series of treatment sets were identified, representing the response of specific AOX and NDH genes to mitochondrial inhibition, plastid inhibition and abiotic stresses. These treatment sets emphasise the multiplicity of pathways affecting alternative electron transport components in plants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11103-005-5514-7DOI Listing
May 2005

A transcriptomic and proteomic characterization of the Arabidopsis mitochondrial protein import apparatus and its response to mitochondrial dysfunction.

Plant Physiol 2004 Feb 15;134(2):777-89. Epub 2004 Jan 15.

Plant Molecular Biology Group, School of Biomedical and Chemical Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia.

Mitochondria import hundreds of cytosolically synthesized proteins via the mitochondrial protein import apparatus. Expression analysis in various organs of 19 components of the Arabidopsis mitochondrial protein import apparatus encoded by 31 genes showed that although many were present in small multigene families, often only one member was prominently expressed. This was supported by comparison of real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and microarray experimental data with expressed sequence tag numbers and massive parallel signature sequence data. Mass spectrometric analysis of purified mitochondria identified 17 import components, their mitochondrial sub-compartment, and verified the presence of TIM8, TIM13, TIM17, TIM23, TIM44, TIM50, and METAXIN proteins for the first time, to our knowledge. Mass spectrometry-detected isoforms correlated with the most abundant gene transcript measured by expression data. Treatment of Arabidopsis cell culture with mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A resulted in a significant increase in transcript levels of import components, with a greater increase observed for the minor isoforms. The increase was observed 12 h after treatment, indicating that it was likely a secondary response. Microarray analysis of rotenone-treated cells indicated the up-regulation of gene sets involved in mitochondrial chaperone activity, protein degradation, respiratory chain assembly, and division. The rate of protein import into isolated mitochondria from rotenone-treated cells was halved, even though rotenone had no direct effect on protein import when added to mitochondria isolated from untreated cells. These findings suggest that transcription of import component genes is induced when mitochondrial function is limited and that minor gene isoforms display a greater response than the predominant isoforms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.103.033910DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC344553PMC
February 2004
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