Publications by authors named "Kanokporn Pinyopornpanish"

25 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Social networking site usage: A systematic review of its relationship with social isolation, loneliness, and depression among older adults.

Aging Ment Health 2021 Aug 24:1-9. Epub 2021 Aug 24.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai,Thailand.

Objective: Older adults, age ≥ 60years, are at risk of depression, which is aggravated by loneliness and social isolation. The use of social networking sites (SNS) has been reported to be beneficial to help people stay in touch with their families and communities. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between SNS usage and social isolation, loneliness, and depression among older adults.

Methods: The online electronic search for literature was conducted up to June 2020 using three databases and searching from reference lists to find potential studies. The inclusion criteria were based on three main study characteristics: (i) a study population of adults age ≥ 60 years, (ii) examine SNS usage, and (iii) report depression or loneliness or social isolation as outcomes.

Results: Fifteen articles were included: ten observational and five experimental studies. Five studies focused on depression and five studies on loneliness/social isolation, while five studies reported on both outcomes. Among observational studies, there was some evidence that SNS usage was associated with lower levels of depression and loneliness scores, but a very limited number of experimental studies were able to obtain similar results. For social isolation, no study found significant associations between SNS usage and lower levels of social isolation.

Conclusions: This review found very limited evidence, especially from experimental studies, to support associations between SNS use with depression, loneliness, and social isolation among older adults. More studies are needed to enhance understanding to make valid conclusions.

The systematic review was registered in the PROSPERO database on 10 April 2019 and updated in July 2020 (CRD42019125267).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2021.1966745DOI Listing
August 2021

Utilization of Health Care Services and Common Disease Diagnoses among University Students: An Analysis of 35,249 Students from Thailand.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 07 4;18(13). Epub 2021 Jul 4.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.

The health care services for university students are important to improve student health and well-being. Analyzing the database of health conditions in the health service system will identify common health problems, which could be useful in further appropriate and specific health service planning. This study aims to investigate the utilization of health care services and common disease diagnoses among university students enrolled at Chiang Mai University during the academic year of 2018. A retrospective study was carried out using health data from the electronic health records (EHR) database of the university hospital. Ethical procedures were followed. Out of the overall 35,249 students in the academic year 2018, 17,284 students (49.03%) had visited an outpatient department (65,150 outpatient department visits), and 407 students (1.15%) had been admitted to the hospital (458 inpatient department admissions). The proportions of utilization between each field of education and training were similar across both groups. The top five categories of diagnosis, for both outpatient department visits and inpatient department admissions, differed between gender. Some of the most common diseases included trauma and injury conditions, respiratory diseases, and mental health. The conclusion of the study is that integration of a health promotion program with preventive methods, especially regarding traffic injury, transmitted diseases, mental health support, and safe environments are essential for university students. A general overview of utilization and common diseases among university students, which is still lacking in the literature, could be useful as a platform to enhance health care services for common diseases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18137148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8297256PMC
July 2021

Palliative Performance Scale and survival in patients with cancer and non-cancer diagnoses needing a palliative care consultation: a retrospective cohort study.

BMC Palliat Care 2021 May 26;20(1):74. Epub 2021 May 26.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Background: Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) has been frequently used to estimate the survival time of palliative care patients. The objective was to determine the associations between the PPS and survival time among cancer and non-cancer patients in Thailand.

Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study. All in-patient adults who received a palliative care consultation at Chiang Mai University Hospital between 1 July 2018 to 31 July 2019 were included in the study and were followed-up until 26 June 2020. The Palliative Performance Scale was assessed using the validated Thai-Palliative Performance Scale for Adults. Survival analysis was used to determine the association between the Palliative Performance Scale and survival time among cancer and non-cancer patients.

Results: Out of 407 patients, 220 were male (54.1%). There were 307 cancer patients (75.4%) and 100 non-cancer patients (24.6%). The PPS and survival time in cancer patients were significantly correlated. Cancer patients with PPS 10, 20, 30, 40-60, and 70-80% had a median survival time of 2, 6, 13, 39, and 95 days, respectively. Non-cancer patients with PPS 10, 20, and 30% had a median survival time of 8, 6, and 24 days, respectively.

Conclusions: While useful for estimating survival time for cancer patients, other factors should be taken into account in estimating the survival time for non-cancer patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-021-00773-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8157447PMC
May 2021

Effects of Metformin on Hepatic Steatosis in Adults with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Diabetes: Insights from the Cellular to Patient Levels.

Gut Liver 2021 Apr 7. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Cardiac Electrophysiology Research and Training Center, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients with diabetes constitute a subgroup of patients with a high rate of liver-related complications. Currently, there are no specific drug recommendations for these patients. Metformin, a conventional insulin sensitizer agent, has been widely prescribed in patients with diabetes. Metformin treatment has been shown to be effective at alleviating hepatic lipogenesis in animal models of NAFLD, with a variety of mechanisms being deemed responsible. To date, most studies have enrolled diabetic patients who are treated with metformin, with the drug being taken continuously throughout the study. Although evidence exists regarding the benefits of metformin for NAFLD in preclinical studies, reports on the efficacy of metformin in adult NAFLD patients have had some discrepancies regarding changes in liver biochemistry and hepatic fat content. Evidence has also suggested possible effects of metformin as regards the prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma tumorigenesis. This review was performed to comprehensively summarize the available and clinical studies regarding the effects of metformin on liver steatosis for the treatment of adult NAFLD patients with diabetes. Consistent reports as well as controversial findings are included in this review, and the mechanistic insights are also provided. In addition, this review focuses on the efficacy of metformin as a monotherapy and as a combined therapy with other antidiabetic medications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5009/gnl20367DOI Listing
April 2021

Perceived stress and depressive symptoms not neuropsychiatric symptoms predict caregiver burden in Alzheimer's disease: a cross-sectional study.

BMC Geriatr 2021 03 12;21(1):180. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawaroros Rd. Tambon Sriphoom, Amphur Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: Caregiver burden affects the caregiver's health and is related to the quality of care received by patients. This study aimed to determine the extent to which caregivers feel burdened when caring for patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and to investigate the predictors for caregiving burden.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted. One hundred two caregivers of patients with AD at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, a tertiary care hospital, were recruited. Assessment tools included the perceived stress scale (stress), PHQ-9 (depressive symptoms), Zarit Burden Interview-12 (burden), Clinical Dementia Rating (disease severity), Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaires (neuropsychiatric symptoms), and Barthel Activities Daily Living Index (dependency). The mediation analysis model was used to determine any associations.

Results: A higher level of severity of neuropsychiatric symptoms (r = 0.37, p < 0.01), higher level of perceived stress (r = 0.57, p < 0.01), and higher level of depressive symptoms (r = 0.54, p < 0.01) were related to a higher level of caregiver burden. The direct effect of neuropsychiatric symptoms on caregiver burden was fully mediated by perceived stress and depressive symptoms (r = 0.13, p = 0.177), rendering an increase of 46% of variance in caregiver burden by this parallel mediation model. The significant indirect effect of neuropsychiatric symptoms by these two mediators was (r = 0.21, p = 0.001).

Conclusion: Caregiver burden is associated with patients' neuropsychiatric symptoms indirectly through the caregiver's depressive symptoms and perception of stress. Early detection and provision of appropriate interventions and skills to manage stress and depression could be useful in reducing and preventing caregiver burden.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-021-02136-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7953798PMC
March 2021

The Treatment of Unidentified Hematotoxic Snake Envenomation and the Clinical Manifestations of a Protobothrops kelomohy Bite.

Wilderness Environ Med 2021 Mar 27;32(1):83-87. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Electronic address:

Hematotoxic snake envenomation is clinically important and has serious complications. This case report describes the clinical manifestations of a bite from a newly described species of hematotoxic snake and the outcomes of treatment using locally available antivenom and supportive management. A 39-y-old male was bitten on his right ankle by an unidentified snake. The patient developed coagulopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and clinical signs of compartment syndrome of his right leg within the first day. Eight doses (30 mL, or 3 vials per dose), or a total of 240 mL, of hemato-polyvalent antivenin (Thai Red Cross, Thailand) were given. Aggressive intravenous hydration and alkalinization of urine were performed, and a fasciotomy was performed for the treatment of suspected compartment syndrome. The patient's clinical symptoms and laboratory results indicated progressive improvement during the 5 d of hospitalization. The snake was later identified as Protobothrops kelomohy, a novel snake species with no clinical data available regarding its envenomation of humans. This case shows that P kelomohy envenomation can produce severe effects that occur both locally and systemically. The benefits of the use of polyvalent antivenom in this situation were unclear. However, with supportive treatment in conjunction with serial clinical and laboratory monitoring, the patient recovered, albeit after 7 d of hospitalization.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2020.11.001DOI Listing
March 2021

Clinical audit of adherence to hypertension treatment guideline and control rates in hospitals of different sizes in Thailand.

J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) 2021 04 27;23(4):702-712. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

World Health Organization Country Office for Thailand, Nonthaburi, Thailand.

A clinical audit of hospitals in Thailand was conducted to assess compliance with the national hypertension treatment guidelines and determine hypertension control rates across facilities of different sizes. Stratified random sampling was used to select sixteen hospitals of different sizes from four provinces. These included community (<90 beds), large (90-120 beds), and provincial (>120 beds) hospitals. Among new cases, the audit determined whether (i) the recommended baseline laboratory assessment was completed, (ii) the initial choice of medication was appropriate based on the patient's cardiovascular risk, and (iii) patients received medication adjustments when indicated. The hypertension control rates at six months and at the last visit were recorded. Among the 1406 patients, about 75% had their baseline glucose and kidney function assessed. Nearly 30% (n = 425/1406) of patients were indicated for dual therapy but only 43% of them (n = 182/425) received this. During treatment, 28% (198/1406) required adjustments in medication but this was not done. The control of hypertension at six months after treatment initiation was 53% varying between 51% in community and 56% in large hospitals (p < .01). The hypertension control rate at last visit was 64% but varied between 59% in community hospitals and 71% in large hospitals (p < .01). Failure to adjust medication when required was associated with 30% decrease in the odds of hypertension control (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0. 50 to 0.90). Failure to comply with the treatment guidelines regarding adjustment of medication and lost to follow-up are possible target areas to improve hypertension control in Thailand.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jch.14193DOI Listing
April 2021

Scalable solution for delivery of diabetes self-management education in Thailand (DSME-T): a cluster randomised trial study protocol.

BMJ Open 2020 10 5;10(10):e036963. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health,London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is among the foremost health challenges facing policy makers in Thailand as its prevalence has more than tripled over the last two decades, accounting for considerable death, disability and healthcare expenditure. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) programmes show promise in improving diabetes outcomes, but this is not routinely used in Thailand. This study aims to test a culturally tailored DSME model in Thailand, using a three-arm cluster randomised controlled trial comparing a nurse-led model, a peer-assisted model and standard care. We will test which model is effective and cost effective to improve cardiovascular risk and control of blood glucose among people with diabetes.

Methods And Analysis: 21 primary care units in northern Thailand will be randomised to one of three interventions, enrolling a total of 693 patients. The primary care units will be randomised (1:1:1) to participate in a culturally-tailored DSME intervention for 12 months. The three-arm trial design will compare effectiveness of nurse-led, peer-assisted (Thai village health volunteers) and standard care. The primary trial outcomes are changes in haemoglobin A1c and cardiovascular risk score. A process evaluation and cost effectiveness evaluation will be conducted to produce policy relevant guidance for the Thai Ministry of Public Health. The planned trial period will start in January 2020 and finish October 2021.

Ethics And Dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained from Thailand and the UK. We will share our study data with other researchers, advertising via our publications and web presence. In particular, we are committed to sharing our findings and data with academic audiences in Thailand and other low-income and middle-income countries.

Trial Registration Number: NCT03938233.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-036963DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7537447PMC
October 2020

Influenza immunization does not predominantly alter levels of phenytoin, and cytochrome P-450 enzymes in epileptic patients receiving phenytoin monotherapy.

Epilepsy Res 2020 11 29;167:106471. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Neurophysiology Unit, Cardiac Electrophysiology Research and Training Center, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; Center of Excellence in Cardiac Electrophysiology Research, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; Department of Oral Biology and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Electronic address:

Objective: The study aims to test the effect of influenza vaccination on phenytoin, CYP2C9, and IFNγ levels in epileptic patients receiving phenytoin monotherapy METHODS: Thirty-one epileptic patients receiving stable-dose phenytoin monotherapy were enrolled onto the study. Serum concentrations of phenytoin, CYP2C9, and IFNγ were compared before and after influenza immunization. The participants were given 0.5 mL of quadrivalent influenza vaccine types A and B subvirion. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, and days 3, 7, 14 post-immunization. The outcomes were levels of phenytoin, CYP2C9, IFNγ, and the incidence of adverse events.

Results: No significant changes in serum phenytoin, IFNγ, and CYP2C9 levels between baseline and days 3, 7, and 14 after immunization were found. The mean levels of phenytoin, IFNγ, and CYP2C9, respectively, were 11.94 ± 7.43, 1.14 ± 0.98, and 47.69 ± 37.53 pg/mL (baseline); 12.15 ± 6.57, 2.13 ± 3.41, and 49.44 ± 39.83 pg/mL (day 3); 12.19 ± 7.69, 1.15 ± 0.94, and 49.48 ± 33.83 pg/mL (day 7); 12.79 ± 7.94, 2.15 ± 3.11, and 53.65 ± 40.91 pg/mL (day 14). The incidence of vaccine-related adverse events, which were generally mild and resolved without clinical consequences, was 58.1 %. No seizure or changes in seizure frequency were observed during the study. One patient experienced dizziness and ataxia which were symptoms attributed to phenytoin toxicity (34.57 μg/mL) by day 14.

Conclusions: Influenza vaccine has no significant effect on the serum phenytoin and CYP2C9 levels in epileptic patients receiving chronic phenytoin monotherapy. The administration of influenza vaccine to epileptic patients receiving phenytoin monotherapy appears to be safe. Therefore, it is not necessary to routinely measure the serum phenytoin level after influenza immunization.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2020.106471DOI Listing
November 2020

Lowered blood pressure targets identify new, uncontrolled hypertensive cases: patient characteristics and implications for services in Thailand.

BMC Health Serv Res 2020 Sep 14;20(1):869. Epub 2020 Sep 14.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawarorot Rd, Sriphum, Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: According to the new hypertension treatment guidelines blood pressure (BP) readings need to be kept below or equal to 130/80 mmHg in patients aged less than 65 years old. This study shows the change in proportion of identified cases of uncontrolled blood pressure in light of these changes.

Methods: The data was collected from 248 hypertensive patients who had visited an outpatient clinic at the Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. Patients were classified into three groups: The 3 groups were: 1) controlled BP group (BP is 130/80 mmHg or lower); 2) newly identified uncontrolled group (BP between 130/80 mmHg and 140/90 mmHg) and 3) existing uncontrolled group (BP higher than 140/90 mmHg). Health behaviors, past history related to hypertensive disease and current pharmacological treatments were compared.

Results: Of the total 248 patients, 56% were female and the mean age was 58.8 (sd 5.99) years old. Following application of the new guidelines, the group designated as uncontrolled increased from 21.7 to 74.2%, an additional 52.4% due to new BP targets. Higher BMI was associated with uncontrolled HT (p = 0.043). While the average number of medication taken was similar across the three groups, it was poor medication adherence (p < 0.013) which was associated with the uncontrolled disease.

Conclusions: Lower BP targets will increase the number of identified hypertensive patients. While intensifying pharmacological treatment may be considered, our study suggests that two behavioral factors should not be overlooked. Weight reduction and enhancement of medication adherence remains an important mainstream treatment strategy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-020-05719-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7490895PMC
September 2020

Exploring perceptions, attitudes and beliefs of Thai patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as they relate to medication adherence at an out-patient primary care clinic in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

BMC Fam Pract 2020 08 21;21(1):173. Epub 2020 Aug 21.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawaroros Road, Sriphum, Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: Within the sphere of diabetes self-management, much emphasis has been placed on medication adherence. There has been a shift in thinking about medication adherence, moving from "compliance" and historically paternalistic models of care, to seeking better ways of characterizing dynamic and complex relationships that determine medication adherence and diabetes control. This study sought to understand the relationship between patient's attitudes and medication adherence for oral anti-diabetics in Thailand.

Methods: In-depth interviews of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, taking oral anti-diabetic drugs, at the out-patient clinic run by the Department of Family Medicine, Chiang Mai University between May and December 2016. Thematic analysis followed the WHO framework for medication adherence in chronic disease to explore patient's attitudes and their influence on medication compliance.

Results: Of 24 patients, 9 were men. The mean age was 62 years (SD 8.9 years). 67% had high compliance. Four themes were identified as important factors related to medication adherence: attitudes toward disease, attitudes toward treatment, attitudes toward family support and attitudes toward health care team. Specifically, symptoms at diagnosis, understanding and acceptance in taking medication, the presence of family support and the perception of concern by the doctor relate to improved medication compliance.

Conclusions: Medication adherence in Thai patients with diabetes requires support from both the health care providers and the family. The patient's perception of the doctor's concern creates greater patient trust in the health care team. This trust, along with family support, helps deepen patients' understanding of the disease, accept the chronic nature of their disease, and engenders a positive attitude towards taking medication that can improve medication adherence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12875-020-01233-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7442984PMC
August 2020

Incorporating the patient-centered approach into clinical practice helps improve quality of care in cases of hypertension: a retrospective cohort study.

BMC Fam Pract 2020 06 12;21(1):108. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Inthawarorot Rd., Sriphum, Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: Treating hypertensive patients by integrating the patient-centered approach would influence the practice and outcome of treatment. Our purpose was to determine whether the implementation of a patient-centered approach in health care delivery can improve adhering to guidelines and the quality-of-care.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted using secondary data from the electronic medical records of the patients treated in the two primary care outpatient settings at the Family Medicine (FM) and Social Security (SS) clinics. A key feature of the FM clinic is the incorporation of a patient-centered approach in its service delivery. Individual information regarding initial assessment and treatment at the follow-up visits was reviewed for 1 year. Comparison of adherence to treatment guidelines between the two primary care clinics was performed by using chi-square, Fisher's exact test or a t-test. To explore the difference in blood pressure and BP control between the two clinics, linear and logistic regression analysis respectively were performed with an adjustment for CV risk score in 2016 as a key confounder.

Results: The evidence included 100 records from each clinic, showed variation between the two primary care sites. The FM clinic had more complete records regarding family history of hypertension, assessment for secondary causes, prescription for lifestyle modification and appropriate adjustment of medication. Higher levels of blood pressure control were recorded in the FM clinic, specifically systolic pressure 2.92 mmHg (p = 0.073) and diastolic pressure 5.38 mmHg (p <  0.001) lower than those recorded in the SS clinic. There was a 2.96 times higher chance for BP goals to be achieved in patients in receipt of hypertensive care at the FM clinic (p = 0.004).

Conclusions: Adopting a patient-centered approach in service delivery could improve the quality of care for hypertension patients in primary care in Thailand.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12875-020-01183-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7293111PMC
June 2020

Health-Risk Behaviours and Injuries among Youth and Young Adults in Chiang Mai, Thailand: A Population-Based Survey.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 05 24;17(10). Epub 2020 May 24.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.

This study aimed to identify the prevalence of health-risk behaviours (alcohol use, tobacco smoking and gambling) and the associations between health-risk behaviours and injuries among youth (15-24 years) and young adults (25-39 years). A multi-stage cluster sampling survey was conducted in Chiang Mai, Thailand. The associations between health-risk behaviours and injuries were analysed using logistic regression and adjusted for potential confounders. Sample weights were applied in all analyses. Six-hundred-and-thirty participants were included. Fifty-three percent of males and 12.3% of females drank in the past three months. Smoking in the past three months was higher among males (38.5%) than females (0.7%). About a quarter of men and a fifth of the women had gambled in the past year. A total of 6.4% of males and 4.8% of females sought medical attention in the past year due to injuries. Compared to those without any of the three health-risk behaviours, the odds ratio for injuries requiring medical attention was 3.81 (95% CI: 1.33 to 10.90, = 0.013) for those with two health-risk behaviours and 13.8 (95% CI: 4.24 to 45.10, < 0.001) for those with all three health-risk behaviours. Injury prevention policies may need to incorporate interventions designed to assess multiple health-risk behaviours.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103696DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7277339PMC
May 2020

Correction to: Investigating psychometric properties of the Thai version of the Zarit Burden Interview using rasch model and confirmatory factor analysis.

BMC Res Notes 2020 04 20;13(1):227. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawaroros Rd. Tambon Sriphoom, Amphur Mueng, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Following the publication of the original article [1], the authors unfortunately became aware of the following errors in Table 3.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-020-05051-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7171755PMC
April 2020

Investigating psychometric properties of the Thai version of the Zarit Burden Interview using rasch model and confirmatory factor analysis.

BMC Res Notes 2020 Mar 2;13(1):120. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Geriatric Psychiatry Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawaroros Rd., T. Sriphum, A. Muang, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Objective: The Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) has been widely used to assess caregiver burden. Few research papers have investigated the Thai version of the ZBI. The study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the Thai version of both the full length (ZBI-22) and short versions (ZBI-12) using Rasch analysis and confirmatory factor analysis among a sample of Alzheimer's disease caregivers.

Results: The ZBI-22 fitted the Rasch measurement model regarding unidimensionality but not for ZBI-12. Five items from ZBI-22, and 2 items from ZBI-12 were shown to be misfitting items. Half of ZBI items were shown to be disordered category or threshold, and were locally dependent. CFA revealed three-factor and four-factor fitted the data the best for ZBI-22 and ZBI-12, respectively. Reliability was good for both forms of the ZBI (α = 0.86-0.92). Significant correlations were found with caregiver's perceived stress, anxiety/depression, pain and mobility but not with self-care and usual activity (p > 0.05), indicating convergent and discriminant validity. To conclude, the Thai version ZBI-22, but not ZBI-12, supported the reliability and unidimensional scale among Alzheimer's disease caregivers. Some misfitting items of the ZBI undermined the unidimensionality of the scale, and need revision.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-020-04967-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7050141PMC
March 2020

Retrospective Review of Documentation Practices of Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin, Birth Dose, and Vaccination at the Hospital of Birth, in Thai Nationals and Migrants in Northern Thailand.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2019 Dec 7;6(12):ofz518. Epub 2019 Dec 7.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Background: Vaccination remains the mainstay of prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) including birth dose and hepatitis B immunoglobulins (HBIGs). National estimates of vaccination coverage exclude migrants. The objective of this study is to investigate documentation practices of HBV-related infant vaccinations in Northern Thailand including migrants.

Methods: This is a retrospective review of hospital records of women who birthed infants in 2015 at Maharaj Nakorn Hospital, Chiang Mai (CM) or on the Thailand-Myanmar border, Tak.

Results: Of 2522 women, 987 were from CM (861 Thai nationals, 126 migrants) and 1535 were from Tak (651 Thai residence and 884 Myanmar residence). In CM, documentation for the birth dose vaccine (999 of 999, 100%) and HBIG was complete. In Tak, documentation was 1441 of 1549 (93%) for birth dose and 26 of 34 (76.5%) for HBIG, with missed opportunities including home delivery, delay in obtaining hepatitis B e-antigen status, and limitations of the records. Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) documentation of 3 follow-up vaccinations dwindled with subsequent doses and distance, and complete documentation of 3 HBV EPI vaccines at the hospital of birth was low, 41.5% (1056 of 2547), but equitable for Thai or migrant status.

Conclusions: This review provides strong support for excellent documentation of HBIG and birth dose vaccination in urban and rural settings, and in migrants, consistent with Thailand's vaccination policy and practice. Documentation of the 3 HBV EPI at the hospital of birth decreases with sequential doses, especially in families further away. Innovative data linkage is required to prove coverage and identify gaps.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofz518DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6934156PMC
December 2019

Risk of harm from alcohol use and heavy alcohol consumption: Its association with other NCD risk factors in Thailand.

Sci Rep 2019 11 8;9(1):16343. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 110 Intawaroros Road, Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

While there is an abundance of literature examining the relation between quantity of alcohol consumption and risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCD), there is less evidence on whether the risk of harm from alcohol use would have a similar relationship with NCD risk factors. The study aims to determine the association between level of harm from alcohol use and NCD risk factors. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among health care workers in Thailand in 2013. The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) was used to assessed risk of harm from alcohol use. The results suggest that higher risk of harm from alcohol use was associated with two of the eight NCD risk factors among women (higher blood pressure and higher triglyceride level) and five of the eight NCD risk factors among men (smoking, physical inactivity, higher blood pressure, higher blood glucose and higher triglyceride level). For men, assessing risk of harm could be incorporated as part of NCD programs as practitioners do not have to worry about the accuracy of the alcohol quantification and conversion to standard drinks. However, among women, quantifying volume may still be needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-52754-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842002PMC
November 2019

Lipocalin-2: Its perspectives in brain pathology and possible roles in cognition.

J Neuroendocrinol 2019 10 28;31(10):e12779. Epub 2019 Aug 28.

Neurophysiology Unit, Cardiac Electrophysiology Research and Training Center, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) has been known to play an important role in pathological conditions, specifically in response to inflammation, infection and injury to cells. Recently, several research teams have been interested in investigating its association with cognition during the progression of pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that LCN2 is not correlated with cognitive function under normal physiological conditions, although LCN2 has been negatively associated with cognition and some neuropathologies. Increasing LCN2 production is associated with reduced cognitive performance in a rodent model. However, further studies are needed to explore the potential underlying mechanisms of LCN2 on cognitive dysfunction, as well as its clinical relevance. This review aims to summarise the evidence available from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies concerning the possible role of LCN2 on cognitive function following the onset of pathological conditions. Any contradictory evidence is also assessed and presented.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jne.12779DOI Listing
October 2019

Utilisation of Electronic Health Records for Public Health in Asia: A Review of Success Factors and Potential Challenges.

Biomed Res Int 2019 8;2019:7341841. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawaroros Road, Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Introduction: Electronic health records offer a valuable resource to improve health surveillance and evaluation as well as informing clinical decision making. They have been introduced in many different settings, including low- and middle-income countries, yet little is known of the progress and effectiveness of similar information systems within Asia. This study examines the implementation of EHR systems for use at a population health level in Asia and to identify their current role within public health, key success factors, and potential barriers in implementation.

Material And Methods: A systematic search process was implemented. Five databases were searched with MeSH key terms and Boolean phrases. Articles selected for this review were based on hospital provider electronic records with a component of implementation, utilisation, or evaluation for health systems or at least beyond direct patient care. A proposed analytic framework considered three interactive components: the content, the process, and the context.

Results: Thirty-two articles were included in the review. Evidence suggests that benefits are significant but identifying and addressing potential challenges are critical for success. A comprehensive preparation process is necessary to implement an effective and flexible system.

Discussion: Electronic health records implemented for public health can allow the identification of disease patterns, seasonality, and global trends as well as risks to vulnerable populations. Addressing implementation challenges will facilitate the development and efficacy of public health initiatives in Asia to identify current health needs and mitigate future risks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/7341841DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6644215PMC
January 2020

Appropriate Total cholesterol cut-offs for detection of abnormal LDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol among low cardiovascular risk population.

Lipids Health Dis 2019 Jan 26;18(1):28. Epub 2019 Jan 26.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawaroros Road, Suthep, Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: Current guidelines suggest screening for dyslipidemia in early adulthood. In Thailand, a screening total cholesterol level is most commonly used potentially due to the costs of the test. However, the appropriate TC cut-off point that correlates with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Non-HDL-C) levels for the low cardiovascular risk younger population have not been examined extensively in the literature.

Methods: This study identified 1754 subjects with low cardiovascular risk. All participants had a physical examination and a venous blood sample sent for laboratory assessment of fasting blood glucose, TC, LDL-C, HDL-C levels. A non-HDL-C level for everyone was calculated by subtracting HDL-C levels from their total cholesterol levels. Sensitivity and specificity of different TC cutoff points in detection of abnormal LDL-C levels (≥ 130 mg/dL and ≥ 160 mg/dL) and abnormal non-HDL-C levels (≥ 160 mg/dL and ≥ 190 mg/dL) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the predictive utility of TC for the abnormal LDL-C and abnormal non-HDL-C levels.

Results: The conventional range TC cut off point, between 200 to 240, had varying diagnostic properties for detection of elevated LDL-C and Non-HDL-C within this low risk population. A TC cut off point 210 would have a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 92.5% for detection of LDL-C ≥ 130 and a sensitivity of 96.7% and specificity of 85.6% for identifying those with Non-HDL-C ≥ 160. The TC cut off point of 230 had a sensitivity of 74.9% and specificity of 92.0% in identifying those with LDL-C ≥ 160 and a sensitivity of 98.6% and specificity of 89.8% in detection of non-HDL-C ≥ 190.

Conclusions: Early screening for dyslipidemia in young adults is suggested by many guidelines. This population is likely to be those with lower cardiovascular risk and may needed to have repeated screening over time. Screening using TC with appropriate a cut off points may be a more cost-effective screening test in settings with limited resources, coverage and accessibility.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12944-019-0975-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6347761PMC
January 2019

Cannabis and Kratom online information in Thailand: Facebook trends 2015-2016.

Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 2018 05 9;13(1):15. Epub 2018 May 9.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: Our study aims to evaluate the trends in online information about cannabis and kratom on Facebook in Thailand, where there is current discussion regarding legalizing these drugs.

Methods: Between April and November 2015, reviewers searched for cannabis and kratom Facebook pages in the Thai language via the common search engines. Content analysis was performed and the contents of each page were categorized by the tone of the post (positive, negative or neutral). Then, a one-year follow-up search was conducted to compare the contents.

Results: Twelve Facebook pages each were initially identified for cannabis and for kratom. Follower numbers were higher for cannabis pages. Kratom pages were less active but were open for a longer time. Posts with positive tones and neutral tones were found for both drugs, but none had negative tones. Other drugs were mentioned on the cannabis pages, but they were different from those mentioned on the kratom pages. Issues regarding drug legalization were found on the cannabis pages but not on the kratom pages during the searching period. One year later, the tone of the posts was in the same direction, but the page activity had increased.

Conclusions: The information currently available on the sampled Facebook pages was positive towards the use of cannabis and kratom. No information about harm from these drugs was found through our search.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13011-018-0155-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5944008PMC
May 2018

Sexual health, risky sexual behavior and condom use among adolescents young adults and older adults in Chiang Mai, Thailand: findings from a population based survey.

BMC Res Notes 2017 Dec 4;10(1):682. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: Sexual health is one of the key dimensions of health across all ages. Understanding risky sexual behaviors remains an important area of public health research. This study aimed to explore sexual health, risky sexual behaviors and factors associated with recent condom use as condom use is considered a main intervention proven to reduce negative health consequences of risky sexual behaviors, specifically related to sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies. A stratified two-stage cluster sampling technique survey was conducted in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Information was obtained about age of first sexual intercourse, sexual activity, condom use, number of partners and history of drug/alcohol use prior to sexual activities within the past 3 months. A weighted analysis was performed to account for data clustering.

Results: It is estimated that most men (93%) and women (86%) in Chiang Mai have engaged in sexual intercourse. More than 70% of the people in Chiang Mai over age 30 remained sexually active in the past 3 months, even for populations over age 50. Eight percent of male teenagers reported having more than one sexual partner in the past 3 months. Regular condom use was reported in less than 5% of the population (6.6% men and 3.1% women).

Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that sexual health is an important public health issue across all age groups. Condom use has been promoted as one way to minimize and prevent unintended consequences of sexual behavior but overall use remains low.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-017-3055-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5715516PMC
December 2017

A population-based survey on physical inactivity and leisure time physical activity among adults in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2014.

Arch Public Health 2017 2;75:41. Epub 2017 Oct 2.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200 Thailand.

Background: Reducing physical inactivity among the population is a challenge for many nations. Targeting leisure time physical activity (LTPA) may be useful in increasing overall physical activity as it is assumed it is associated with a higher degree of free choice and personal preference than physical activity at work and during travel. The study explored the prevalence of physical inactivity and focused on the overall level of energy expenditure and energy level spent during leisure time among those who were physically inactive and assessed the stages of change for LTPA among those who were physically inactive.

Methods: A population-based survey was conducted in 2014 in Chiang Mai, Thailand using a stratified two-stage cluster sampling technique. The Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) was used to collect the data on physical activity. Sufficient levels of physical activity (PA) were defined as ≥150 min/week of moderate-intensity PA or ≥75 min/week of vigorous-intensity PA or ≥600 metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-minutes/week. Weighted analyses were used to estimate the prevalence of physical inactivity, the total energy expenditure and expenditure during LTPA as well as stages of change among the physically inactive population.

Results: A total of 1744 people (808 men and 936 women), aged 15 to 64 years, participated in the study. We estimated that a quarter (26%) of the population were physically inactive. Physical inactivity was more commonly found among women than men in most age groups. LTPA contributed a small proportion of overall PA. On average, physically inactive men spent 132.8 MET-minutes/week and inactive women spent 208.2 MET-minutes/week in overall PA which is well below the 600 MET-minutes/week recommend by the World Health Organization. Around 75% of physically inactive people had no intention of engaging in regular LTPA.

Conclusion: About a quarter of the investigative population were physically inactive. Most physically inactive members of the population participate in low levels of LTPA, but the majority has no intention of increasing PA during leisure time. A large-scale health promotion program is needed, and it should focus on an approach for the pre-contemplated population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13690-017-0210-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5623978PMC
October 2017

Sedative and Analgesic Drugs Online: A Content Analysis of the Supply and Demand Information Available in Thailand.

Subst Use Misuse 2018 03 14;53(4):641-647. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

a Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine , Chiang Mai University , Sriphum, Muang, Chiang Mai , Thailand.

Background: Evidence from other countries has suggested that many controlled drugs are also offered online, even though it is illegal to sell these drugs without a license.

Objectives: To evaluate the current contents related to the supply and demand of sedatives and analgesic drugs available online in Thailand, with a particular focus on Facebook.

Methods: A team of reviewers manually searched for data by entering keywords related to analgesic drugs and sedatives. The contents of the website were screened for supply and demand-related information.

Findings: A total of 5,352 websites were found publicly available. The number of websites and Facebook pages containing the information potentially related to the supply and demand of analgesic drugs and sedatives was limited. Nine websites sold sedatives, and six websites sold analgesics directly. Fourteen Facebook pages were found, including 7 sedative pages and 7 analgesic pages. Within one year, the three remaining active pages multiplied in the number of followers by three- to nine-fold. The most popular Facebook page had over 2,900 followers.

Conclusions: Both the internet and social media contain sites and pages where sedatives and analgesics are illegally advertised. These websites are searchable through common search engines. Although the number of websites is limited, the number of followers on these Facebook pages does suggest a growing number of people who are interested in such pages. Our study emphasized the importance of monitoring and developing potential plans relative to the online marketing of prescription drugs in Thailand.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2017.1355386DOI Listing
March 2018

Functional beliefs and risk minimizing beliefs among Thai healthcare workers in Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai hospital: its association with intention to quit tobacco and alcohol.

Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 2017 07 12;12(1):34. Epub 2017 Jul 12.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 110 Intawaroros Road, Sriphum, Muang, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand.

Background: Individual health beliefs are likely to play a key role in how people respond to knowledge and information about the potential harm from smoking and alcohol abuse. The objectives of the study were to 1) explore whether functional beliefs and risk minimizing beliefs were associated with intention to quit smoking and confidence to quit smoking and 2) explore whether functional beliefs and risk minimizing beliefs were associated with intention to quit alcohol drinking and confidence to quit alcohol drinking.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2013 among health care workers working in Thailand. Using predicted factor scores from factor analysis, the relationship between factor scores for each of the two beliefs and intention to quit and confidence to quit were tested using ANOVA and further adjusted for age and sex using linear regression.

Results: Functional beliefs were inversely associated with the intention to quit and confidence to quit smoking. Both functional beliefs and risk minimizing beliefs were each inversely associated with the intention to quit and confidence to quit alcohol drinking.

Conclusion: Our study enhances the understanding of the complexities of health beliefs regarding these two commonly abused substances. As functional beliefs were associated with smoking and alcohol use, interventions to counter the cultural values and individual beliefs about the benefits of smoking and alcohol use are needed. Tackling risk minimizing beliefs by providing individualized feedback regarding harm may also be useful in alcohol drinkers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13011-017-0118-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5508689PMC
July 2017
-->