Publications by authors named "Kanako Niimori-Kita"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Matrin-3 is essential for fibroblast growth factor 2-dependent maintenance of neural stem cells.

Sci Rep 2018 09 7;8(1):13412. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Department of Dermatology and Plastic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto, 860-8556, Japan.

To investigate the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of neural stem cells, we performed two-dimensional fluorescence-difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) targeting the nuclear phosphorylated proteins. Nuclear phosphorylated protein Matrin-3 was identified in neural stem cells (NSCs) after stimulation using fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). Matrin-3 was expressed in the mouse embryonic subventricular and ventricular zones. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Matrin-3 caused neuronal differentiation of NSCs in vitro, and altered the cerebral layer structure of foetal brain in vivo. Transfection of Matrin-3 plasmids in which the serine 208 residue was point-mutated to alanine (Ser208Ala mutant Matrin3) and inhibition of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM kinase), which phosphorylates Matrin-3 Ser208 residue, caused neuronal differentiation and decreased the proliferation of neurosphere-forming stem cells. Thus, our proteomic approach revealed that Matrin-3 phosphorylation was essential for FGF2-dependent maintenance of NSCs in vitro and in vivo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31597-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6128890PMC
September 2018

Notch1 controls cell chemoresistance in small cell lung carcinoma cells.

Thorac Cancer 2016 01 29;7(1):123-8. Epub 2015 Jul 29.

Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences Kumamoto Japan.

Background: Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is characterized by a high rate of relapse and failure of chemotherapy because of the emergence of drug resistant cells. Notch signaling controls carcinogenesis in several human malignancies and could be involved in the resistance of cells to several chemotherapeutic agents. Herein, we analyzed the role of Notch1 signaling in the resistance of human SCLC cells to doxorubicin.

Methods: Small interfering ribonucleic acid technology was used to knock down (KD) Notch1 in H69AR and SBC-3 SCLC cells. We detected the effect of inhibiting Notch1 on the expression of drug resistant related molecules: multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP-1) and anti-apoptotic factor B-cell lymphoma-2, as well as to cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin, which contributes to the adhesion of SCLC cells to the extracellular matrix and confers chemoresistance in a process known as cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). We also observed the effect of KD Notch1 on cell survival under high concentrations of doxorubicin treated media.

Results: H69AR and SBC-3 cells expressed Notch1 protein and grew as adherent aggregates, which confer resistance to high concentrations of doxorubicin. On inhibiting Notch1, we observed activation of the apoptotic pathway in cells, possibly resulting from the loss of CAM-DR and, thus, SBC-3 cells showed a loss of chemoresistant ability. However, in H69AR cells with KD Notch1, the expression of MRP-1 was increased and, thus, sustained the chemoresistant ability of cells.

Conclusion: The Notch1 signaling pathway is involved in mediating the drug resistance phenotype of SCLC cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1759-7714.12297DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4718138PMC
January 2016

Insulinoma-Associated Protein 1 Is a Crucial Regulator of Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Lung Cancer.

Am J Pathol 2015 Dec 23;185(12):3164-77. Epub 2015 Oct 23.

Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan. Electronic address:

Insulinoma-associated protein 1 (INSM1) is expressed exclusively in embryonic developing neuroendocrine (NE) tissues. INSM1 gene expression is specific for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), along with achaete-scute homolog-like 1 (ASCL1) and several NE molecules, such as chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and neural cell adhesion molecule 1. However, the underlying biological role of INSM1 in lung cancer remains largely unknown. We first showed that surgically resected SCLC samples specifically expressed INSM1. Forced expression of the INSM1 gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines (H358 and H1975) induced the expression of ASCL1, brain-2 (BRN2), chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and neural cell adhesion molecule 1; in contrast, knockdown of the INSM1 gene by siRNA in SCLC (H69 and H889) decreased their expression. However, forced/knockdown expression of ASCL1 and BRN2 did not affect INSM1 expression. A chromatin immunoprecipitation study revealed that INSM1 bound to the promoter region of the ASCL1 gene. A xenotransplantation assay using tet-on INSM1 gene-transfected adenocarcinoma cell lines demonstrated that INSM1 induced NE differentiation and growth inhibition. Furthermore, we found that INSM1 was not expressed in non-small-cell lung cancer and some SCLC cell lines expressing Notch1-Hes1. By forced/knockdown expression of Notch1 or Hes1 genes, we revealed that Notch1-Hes1 signaling suppressed INSM1, as well as ASCL1 and BRN2. INSM1, expressed exclusively in SCLC, is a crucial regulator of NE differentiation in SCLCs, and is regulated by the Notch1-Hes1 signaling pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajpath.2015.08.018DOI Listing
December 2015

Sex differences in shotgun proteome analyses for chronic oral intake of cadmium in mice.

PLoS One 2015 20;10(3):e0121819. Epub 2015 Mar 20.

Isotope Research Center, Nippon Medical School, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Environmental diseases related to cadmium exposure primarily develop owing to industrial wastewater pollution and/or contaminated food. In regions with high cadmium exposure in Japan, cadmium accumulation occurs primarily in the kidneys of individuals who are exposed to the metal. In contrast, in the itai-itai disease outbreak that occurred in the Jinzu River basin in Toyama Prefecture in Japan, cadmium primarily accumulated in the liver. On the other hand, high concentration of cadmium caused renal tubular disorder and osteomalacia (multiple bone fracture), probably resulting from the renal tubular dysfunction and additional pathology. In this study, we aimed to establish a mouse model of chronic cadmium intake. We administered cadmium-containing drinking water (32 mg/l) to female and male mice ad libitum for 11 weeks. Metal analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that cadmium accumulated in the kidneys (927 x 10 + 185 ng/g in females and 661 x 10 + 101 ng/g in males), liver (397 x 10 + 199 ng/g in females and 238 x 10 + 652 ng/g in males), and thyroid gland (293 + 93.7 ng/g in females and 129 + 72.7 ng/g in males) of mice. Female mice showed higher cadmium accumulation in the kidney, liver, and thyroid gland than males did (p = 0.00345, p = 0.00213, and p = 0.0331, respectively). Shotgun proteome analyses after chronic oral administration of cadmium revealed that protein levels of glutathione S-transferase Mu2, Mu4, and Mu7 decreased in the liver, and those of A1 and A2 decreased in the kidneys in both female and male mice.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0121819PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4368563PMC
February 2016

Notch1 controls cell invasion and metastasis in small cell lung carcinoma cell lines.

Lung Cancer 2014 Dec 22;86(3):304-10. Epub 2014 Oct 22.

Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Japan. Electronic address:

Introduction: Notch signaling plays a key role in a wide variety of human neoplasms, and it can be either oncogenic or anti-proliferative. Moreover, Notch function in regulating cancer is unpredictable, and its outcome is strictly context-dependent.

Aim: To study the role of Notch1 signaling in human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and its effect on cell invasion and metastasis.

Materials And Methods: We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology, to down-regulate the expression of Notch1 in H69AR and SBC3 SCLC cells. On the other hand, we up-regulated Notch1 in H69 and H1688 SCLC cells through transfection with venus Notch1 intracellular domain (v.NICD) plasmid. In addition, H69 cells with v.NICD were xenotransplanted into immune-compromised Rag2(-/-) Jak3(-/-) mice, for analysis of ex vivo tumor epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype and for detection of metastatic cancer cells in the lung tissues. Moreover, we examined the metastatic ability for H69AR and SBC3 cells transfected with siRNA against Notch1, compared to their subsequent controls, by use of tail vein xenograft mouse models.

Results: Notch1 controls cell adhesion and EMT. Overexpression of Notch1 in SCLC switched off EMT, cell motility and cell metastatic potential.

Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that activation of Notch1 signaling pathway may represent a new strategy for treating human SCLC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2014.10.007DOI Listing
December 2014

Identification of nuclear phosphoproteins as novel tobacco markers in mouse lung tissue following short-term exposure to tobacco smoke.

FEBS Open Bio 2014 23;4:746-54. Epub 2014 Aug 23.

Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan.

Smoking is a risk factor for lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the progression of these diseases remain unclear. Therefore, we sought to identify signaling pathways activated by tobacco-smoke exposure, by analyzing nuclear phosphoprotein expression using phosphoproteomic analysis of lung tissue from mice exposed to tobacco smoke. Sixteen mice were exposed to tobacco smoke for 1 or 7 days, and the expression of phosphorylated peptides was analyzed by mass spectrometry. A total of 253 phosphoproteins were identified, including FACT complex subunit SPT16 in the 1-day exposure group, keratin type 1 cytoskeletal 18 (K18), and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, in the 7-day exposure group, and peroxiredoxin-1 (OSF3) and spectrin β chain brain 1 (SPTBN1), in both groups. Semi-quantitative analysis of the identified phosphoproteins revealed that 33 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between the control and exposed groups. The identified phosphoproteins were classified according to their biological functions. We found that the identified proteins were related to inflammation, regeneration, repair, proliferation, differentiation, morphogenesis, and response to stress and nicotine. In conclusion, we identified proteins, including OSF3 and SPTBN1, as candidate tobacco smoke-exposure markers; our results provide insights into the mechanisms of tobacco smoke-induced diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fob.2014.08.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4208089PMC
October 2014

Tsukushi is involved in the wound healing by regulating the expression of cytokines and growth factors.

J Cell Commun Signal 2014 Sep 27;8(3):173-7. Epub 2014 Aug 27.

Department of Developmental Neurobiology, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto, 860-8556, Japan.

During the wound-healing process, macrophages, fibroblasts, and myofibroblasts play a leading role in shifting from the inflammation phase to the proliferation phase, although little is known about the cell differentiation and molecular control mechanisms underlying these processes. Previously, we reported that Tsukushi (TSK), a member of the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan family, functions as a key extracellular coordinator of multiple signalling networks. In this study, we investigated the contribution of TSK to wound healing. Analysis of wound tissue in heterozygous TSK-lacZ knock-in mice revealed a pattern of sequential TSK expression from macrophages to myofibroblasts. Quantitative PCR and in vitro cell induction experiments showed that TSK controls macrophage function and myofibroblast differentiation by inhibiting TGF-β1 secreted from macrophages. Our results suggest TSK facilitates wound healing by maintaining inflammatory cell quiescence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12079-014-0241-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4165825PMC
September 2014

Notch1 signaling controls cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation in lung carcinoma.

Lung Cancer 2014 Aug 13;85(2):131-40. Epub 2014 May 13.

Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Japan. Electronic address:

Objectives: The role of Notch signaling in human lung cancer still remains unclear, and there has been and stills a debate, on the extent to which Notch ligands and receptors are involved in lung cancer development. This study was carried out to investigate the role of Notch1 signaling in the proliferation and differentiation of human lung cancer cells.

Methods: We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression of Notch1 in small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cells; H69AR and SBC-3, as well as in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells; A549 adenocarcinoma (ADC) and H2170 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Also, we transfected venus Notch1 intracellular domain (v.NICD) plasmid into the human SCLC line H69 and H1688. In addition, H1688 cells with activated Notch1 were injected into immune-compromised Rag2(-/-) Jak3(-/-) mice for analysis of ex vivo tumor growth and differentiation phenotype.

Results: Notch1 controls cell proliferation and apoptosis in both SCLC and A549; but not in H2170 cell line. Overexpression of Notch1 in SCLC markedly decreased cell proliferation via apoptosis. The subcutaneous tumors arising from xenotransplaned SCLC cells transfected with Notch1 showed "epithelial-like glandular" arrangement, with positive Alcian blue staining and reduction in neuroendocrine markers.

Conclusion: Notch1 up regulation has an inhibitory effect on cell growth and NE differentiation in SCLC, with induction of an epithelial-like morphology of cells in tissue samples. In NSCLC, Notch1 expression has a tumor inhibitory effect on ADC cells, but not SCC cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2014.05.001DOI Listing
August 2014

Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-label-retaining cells in mouse terminal bronchioles.

Histol Histopathol 2014 May 4;29(5):659-68. Epub 2013 Dec 4.

Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto, Japan.

Adult male mice were continuously treated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 1, 2, or 4 weeks by an osmotic pump. To detect BrdU-label-retaining cells (LRCs), putative progenitor/stem cells, other animals were continuously treated with BrdU for 2 weeks, and were then kept without any treatments for 2, 6, or 18 months. The lungs were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and were paraffin-embedded. We observed terminal bronchioles with BrdU immunostaining alone or with BrdU immunostaining accompanying immunostaining for Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP), forkhead box protein J1 (FoxJ1), or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The average incidences of BrdU-incorporated cells in the terminal bronchioles after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of continuous BrdU infusion were 6.2%, 11.9%, and 23.1%, respectively. Most BrdU-incorporated cells in these periods were CCSP-immunoreactive (91.7%, 91.3%, and 88.2%, respectively), which means progenitor function of Clara cells. FoxJ1-immunoreactive BrdU-incorporated cells were fewer (5.4%, 3.0%, 2.7%, respectively). The average incidences of BrdU-LRCs in the terminal bronchioles after 2, 6, and 18 months were 7.2%, 4.3, and 2.7%, respectively. Most BrdU-LRCs were CCSP-immunoreactive (91.0%, 92.7%, and 89.6%, respectively), and FoxJ1-immunoreactive BrdU-LRCs were fewer (6.0%, 5.7%, and 2.1%, respectively). CGRP-positive BrdU-incorporated cells were occasional. CGRP-positive BrdU-LRCs were detected in 17.6% of neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) at 2 months, but disappeared at 6 months. BrdU-positive stem cell candidates, which locate at the brochiolo-alveolar duct junction or cover NEB, were few throughout this study. In conclusion, in the lungs treated only with BrdU, CCSP-immunoreactive cells are important to maintain homeostasis in the terminal bronchiolar epithelium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14670/HH-29.10.659DOI Listing
May 2014

The pathological significance of Notch1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

Lab Invest 2013 Oct 12;93(10):1068-81. Epub 2013 Aug 12.

1] Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan [2] Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.

Notch signaling has been reported to be involved in several types of malignant tumors; however, the role and activation mechanism of Notch signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the pathological significance of Notch signaling and its activation mechanism in the development and progression of OSCC. In this study, we showed that the expression of Notch1 and intracellular Notch domain (NICD) are upregulated in OSCCs. In addition, Notch1 and NICD were found to be characteristically localized at the invasive tumor front. TNF-α, a major inflammatory cytokine, significantly activated Notch signaling in vitro. In a clinicopathological analysis, Notch1 expression correlated with both the T-stage and the clinical stage. Furthermore, loss of Notch1 expression correlated with the inhibition of cell proliferation and TNF-α-dependent invasiveness in an OSCC cell line. In addition, γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) prevented cell proliferation and TNF-α-dependent invasion of OSCC cells in vitro. These results indicate that altered expression of Notch1 is associated with increased cancer progression and that Notch1 regulates the steps involved in cell metastasis in OSCC. Moreover, inactivating Notch signaling with GSI could therefore be a useful approach for treating patients with OSCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/labinvest.2013.95DOI Listing
October 2013

Tsukushi controls the hair cycle by regulating TGF-β1 signaling.

Dev Biol 2012 Dec 18;372(1):81-7. Epub 2012 Sep 18.

Department of Developmental Neurobiology, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan.

The hair follicle contains stem/progenitor cells that supply progeny for skin development and the hair cycle. Several signaling molecules belonging to the Wnt, BMP, shh, and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling cascades are involved in the normal hair follicle cycle. However, the systemic mechanism of how these humoral factors are controlled remains largely unknown. Previously, we reported that Tsukushi (TSK), a member of the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan family, functions extracellularly as a key coordinator of multiple signaling networks. Here, we show that TSK is expressed at the restricted areas of hair follicle during the morphogenesis and the hair cycle. Targeted disruption of the TSK gene causes the hair cycle to be delayed with low levels of TGF-β1 and phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3) expression. Biochemical analysis indicates that TSK directly binds to TGF-β1. Our data suggest that TSK controls the hair cycle by regulating TGF-β1 signaling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2012.08.030DOI Listing
December 2012
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