Publications by authors named "Kanako Munakata"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bacterial Distribution and Community Structure in Beef Cattle Liver and Bile at Slaughter.

J Food Prot 2021 Nov 24. Epub 2021 Nov 24.

National Institute of Health Sciences 3-25-26 Tonomachi, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki, JAPAN Kanagawa 210-9501 +81442706563.

In this study, the distribution of hygienic indicator bacteria in cattle livers and bile was examined at slaughterhouses. First, 127 cattle livers with gallbladders were carefully eviscerated from the carcasses at 10 slaughterhouses. Microbiological examination showed that 9 bile (7.1%) and 19 liver parenchyma (15.0%) samples were positive for the family Enterobacteriaceae (EB) with means ± SD of 3.68 ± 4.63 log CFU/mL and 1.59 ± 2.47 log CFU/g, respectively; thus, bacterial contamination was apparent even at the postevisceration stage. Subsequently, 70 cattle livers were obtained at the postprocessing/storage stage from 7 of the ten slaughterhouses; microbiological analysis revealed greater means of EB in the liver parenchyma (means ± SD of 3.00 ± 3.89 log CFU/g, P =0.011) than those at postevisceration stage, suggesting that bacterial dissemination and/or replication occurred in the liver parenchyma during processing and storage. According to 16S rRNA ion semiconductor sequencing analysis of representative samples from 12 cattle, Proteobacteria , Firmicutes , and Actinobacteria were dominant in both the parenchyma and bile, in which EB/ Escherichia coli were predominate among EB-rich livers. These results suggest that bile plays a role as a vehicle for bacterial transmission to the liver parenchyma. This is the first study to demonstrate bacterial distribution and community structure in the liver and biliary microecosystem of cattle at slaughter. Our data provide possible implication of EB testing in bile to screen cattle livers contaminated with high levels of fecal indicator bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/JFP-21-288DOI Listing
November 2021

Clinical value of entire-circumferential intraoperative frozen section analysis for the complete resection of superficial squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue.

Oral Oncol 2021 Nov 13;123:105629. Epub 2021 Nov 13.

Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Implantology, Kanagawa Dental University, Yokosuka, Japan. Electronic address:

Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the clinical value of an entire-circumferential intraoperative frozen section analysis (e-IFSA) for the complete resection of superficial squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue.

Materials And Methods: A total 276 specimens from 51 patients with pT1-2, N0, mucosal or submucosal invasion SCC were analyzed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the e-IFSA and the added value of the e-IFSA to iodine staining. The e-IFSA results were compared with the final histologic results obtained using permanent sections. All specimens for the e-IFSA were taken over the entire circumference 5 mm outside from the iodine unstained areas. The outline of the main resected specimen after taking these outer mucosal specimens were defined as the surgical margins determined by iodine staining alone.

Results: The e-IFSA results were in excellent agreement with final histological results (Cohen's kappa value: 0.85) and the e-IFSA showed high sensitivity (100%) and high negative predictive value (100%). The actual complete resection rate with an e-IFSA was 100% (51/51), and no patient required additional resection after surgery. In contrast, 10/51 patients (20%) patients showed residual atypical mucosal epithelium at or beyond the margin determined by iodine staining alone; this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.002). The 5-year local control rate and 5-year overall survival rate after this procedure were both 100%.

Conclusion: An e-IFSA has additional value when performed in conjunction with iodine staining. An e-IFSA would be useful for achieving complete resection of superficial SCC of the tongue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2021.105629DOI Listing
November 2021

Acute odontogenic infection combined with crowned dens syndrome: a case report.

J Med Case Rep 2019 May 13;13(1):143. Epub 2019 May 13.

Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan.

Background: Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease is a condition in which calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal is deposited in joint cartilage and ligaments. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease that involves calcification around the odontoid process of the second cervical vertebra is called crowned dens syndrome. Crowned dens syndrome is accompanied by fever in addition to acute and intense neck, posterior head, and temporal pain; thus, distinguishing crowned dens syndrome may be difficult in the presence of odontogenic infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing a patient with crowned dens syndrome with coexisting odontogenic infection.

Case Presentation: A 75-year-old Japanese woman was examined in the Emergency Department of this hospital due to a chief complaint of worsened buccal swelling on the left side. An odontogenic infection was considered, and she underwent her first examination. She presented with a body temperature of 37.4 °C, marked swelling and tenderness of her left lower eyelid through to her left cheek, and pain on the left temporal area. Blood tests revealed a leukocyte count of 6700/μL and a C-reactive protein level of 7.15 mg/dL. There was swelling and pain around the gingiva and acute purulent apical periodontitis of left maxillary second premolar. Cellulitis of the left cheek was diagnosed. After performing drainage of the pus, antibiotic treatment was initiated. Although her clinical symptoms improved, blood tests on day 9 of hospitalization revealed a leukocyte count of 6500/μL and a C-reactive protein level of 25.62 mg/dL, which were indicative of worsening symptoms. Computed tomography was performed to evaluate remote infection and images revealed a calcification around the odontoid process of her second cervical vertebra. When she was referred to the Orthopedic Surgery Department, pseudogout of the cervical spine was diagnosed. Subsequently, oral acetaminophen was initiated, and both her leukocyte count and C-reactive protein improved markedly.

Conclusions: In the presence of persistent fever and abnormally high leukocyte and C-reactive protein indicative of an inflammatory reaction, coexistence of pseudogout should be considered. In particular, when symptoms of temporal pain are present, the possibility of pseudogout of the cervical spine must be considered in the differential diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-019-2084-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6513512PMC
May 2019

Desmoid-type fibromatosis of the head and neck in children: a case report and review of the literature.

J Med Case Rep 2016 Jun 10;10:173. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, School of Medicine, Keio University, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan.

Background: Desmoid-type fibromatosis is defined as an intermediate tumor that rarely occurs in the head and neck of children. There is no doubt as to the value of complete surgical excision for desmoid-type fibromatosis. However, in pediatric patients, surgeons may often be concerned about making a wide excision because of the potential for functional morbidity. Some studies have reported a lack of correlation between margin status and recurrence. Therefore, we discussed our findings with a focus on the state of surgical margins.

Case Presentation: We report an unusual case of a 9-month-old Japanese girl who prior to presenting at our hospital underwent debulking surgery twice with chemotherapy for desmoid-type fibromatosis of the tongue at another hospital. We performed a partial glossectomy and simultaneous reconstruction with local flap and achieved microscopic complete resection. We also reviewed available literature of pediatric desmoid-type fibromatosis in the head and neck.

Conclusions: We described successful treatment for the refractory case of pediatric desmoid-type fibromatosis. The review results showed that some microscopic incomplete resections of tumors in pediatric patients with desmoid-type fibromatosis tended to be acceptable with surgical treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-016-0949-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4902910PMC
June 2016

Development of a competition model for microbial growth in mixed culture.

Biocontrol Sci 2014 ;19(2):61-71

Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Agriculture Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology.

A novel competition model for describing bacterial growth in mixed culture was developed in this study. Several model candidates were made with our logistic growth model that precisely describes the growth of a monoculture of bacteria. These candidates were then evaluated for the usefulness in describing growth of two competing species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacterial cells of two species grew at initial doses of 10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) CFU/g at 28ºC. Among the candidates, a model where the Lotka-Volterra model, a general competition model in ecology, was incorporated as a new term in our growth model was the best for describing all types of growth of two competitors in mixed culture. Moreover, the values for the competition coefficient in the model were stable at various combinations of the initial populations of the species. The Baranyi model could also successfully describe the above types of growth in mixed culture when it was coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model. However, the values for the competition coefficients in the competition model varied with the conditions. The present study suggested that our model could be a basic model for describing microbial competition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4265/bio.19.61DOI Listing
February 2015
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