Publications by authors named "Kamran Gulsahi"

21 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparative analysis of different periapical index systems used in cone-beam computed tomography.

Aust Endod J 2021 Feb 6. Epub 2021 Feb 6.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

This study aimed to compare the three index systems designed for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in terms of intra- and inter-observer agreement. 117 root-filled teeth with or without periapical radiolucency from 77 of already existing CBCT images were chosen randomly. Two observers evaluated the periapical status of the selected teeth and graded the scores twice using CBCT periapical index (CBCTPAI), endodontic radiolucency index (ERI) and complex periapical index (COPI) part of the periapical and endodontic status scale (PESS), respectively. The researchers' self-agreement kappa values ranged from substantial to almost perfect. A moderate inter-observer agreement was present for the COPI and ERI, whereas a fair agreement was present for CBCTPAI. The researchers' ICC for the inter-observer reliability of CBCTPAI, ERI and COPI was 0.75, 0.77 and 0.80, respectively. COPI had the highest self-agreement and inter-observer reliability. ERI showed the highest intra-observer variation, whereas CBCTPAI showed the highest inter-observer variation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aej.12486DOI Listing
February 2021

Comparison of three adhesive systems in class II composite restorations in endodontically treated teeth: Influence of Er:YAG laser conditioning and gingival margin levels on microleakage.

J Clin Exp Dent 2018 Aug 1;10(8):e781-e788. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Professor, Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Baskent University, Bahcelievler-Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Dental surface conditioning by Er:YAG laser is currently being investigated, as not all of the mechanisms and effects of this technique have been clearly studied. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess the cervical microleakage of Class II resin composite restorations in endodontically treated teeth following either the respective conventional conditioning or additional Er:YAG laser conditioning, in association with varied adhesives.

Material And Methods: Standardized mesial-occlusal-distal cavities (two gingival walls positioned in dentin and enamel, respectively) were created in 60 extracted human premolar teeth. Following the completion of the endodontic therapy, the teeth were grouped into six categories based on conditioning modality and adhesive strategy as follows: group 1-37% phosphoric acid/Adper Single Bond 2 (ASB2); group 2-Er:YAG laser/37% phosphoric acid/ASB2; group 3-Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); group 4-Er:YAG laser/CSE; group 5-Adper Easy One (AEO); and group 6-Er:YAG laser/AEO. Specimens were submitted to thermocycling and dye penetration, followed by longitudinal sectioning. The dye penetration was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. One specimen from each group was assessed under a scanning electron microscope for adhesive interface analysis.

Results: No significant differences were found between the conditioning modalities, nor between the adhesive systems at both margins. Groups 1 and 2 showed a lower degree of microleakage in the enamel vs. dentin ( = 0.002). Group 2 showed a significantly lower incidence of microleakage in enamel vs. dentin ( = 0.005).

Conclusions: CSE and AEO were comparable with that of ASB2 regarding sealing ability. Additional Er:YAG laser conditioning may be beneficial before ASB2 application in enamel. Endodontically treated teeth, etch-and-rinse adhesive, Er:YAG laser, gingival level, sealing ability, self-etch adhesive.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.54843DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6174014PMC
August 2018

A Comparison of Er:YAG Laser with Photon-Initiated Photoacoustic Streaming, Nd:YAG Laser, and Conventional Irrigation on the Eradication of Root Dentinal Tubule Infection by Biofilms: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study.

Scanning 2017 27;2017:6215482. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey.

This study evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of Er:YAG laser activation with photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming (PIPS), Nd:YAG laser disinfection, and conventional irrigation on biofilms using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Biofilms were grown on 110 root halves and divided into the following: Groups 1 and 2 (saline and 1% NaOCl with apical position of PIPS, resp.), Groups 3 and 4 (saline and 1% NaOCl with coronal position of PIPS, resp.), Groups 5 and 6 (Nd:YAG laser after saline and 1% NaOCl irrigation, resp.) and Groups 7, 8, and 9 (conventional irrigation with 1% NaOCl, 6% NaOCl, and saline, resp.). SEM images of the apical, middle, and coronal levels were examined using a scoring system. Score differences between Groups 1 and 2 were insignificant at all levels in the remaining biofilm. Group 4 had significantly greater bacterial elimination than Group 3 at all levels. Differences in Nd:YAG laser irradiation between Groups 5 and 6 were insignificant. Groups 7 and 8 were insignificantly different, except at the middle level. Saline group had a higher percentage of biofilms than the others. In this study, PIPS activation with NaOCl eliminates more biofilms in all root canals regardless of the position of the fiber tip.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/6215482DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5723936PMC
August 2018

Change in Periapical Lesion and Adjacent Mucosal Thickening Dimensions One Year after Endodontic Treatment: Volumetric Cone-beam Computed Tomography Assessment.

J Endod 2017 Feb;43(2):218-224

Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey.

Introduction: Changes in periapical lesion dimensions along with mucosal thickening after endodontic treatment have not been studied yet. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to obtain linear and volumetric measurements of lesion dimensions in maxillary first molars with periapical pathology and (2) to measure maxillary sinus mucosal thickening in the vicinity of periapical lesions before and 1 year after endodontic treatment by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT).

Methods: Twenty-one maxillary first molar teeth of 21 patients (14 female and 7 male) with periapical lesion that had local mucosal thickening in the vicinity of the periapical lesion were endodontically treated. A total of 21 maxillary first molar roots (8 mesiobuccal roots, 6 distobuccal roots, and 7 palatal roots), each one from different patients, was included. Pretreatment and 1-year post-treatment CBCT images of each tooth were obtained by using Kodak CS 9300 3D CBCT unit. Width, height, surface area, and volume measurements of periapical lesions and mucosal thickening of the maxillary sinus mucosa in the vicinity of the periapical lesion were measured before and 1 year after endodontic treatment. General linear model (analysis of variance) was used for the comparisons between measurements, and significance was set at P < .05. Regression analysis was also used to test the correlation between different measurements.

Results: We found statistically significant differences between mean pretreatment and mean post-treatment measurements conducted by using CBCT images (width, P = .002; height, P < .001; maximum mucosal thickening, P < .001; medium mucosal thickening, P < .001; minimum mucosal thickening, P < .001; surface area, P = .032; and volume, P = .034). Considering gender, age, and root-type variables, no significant differences were found for all the measurements conducted (P > .05). There were 36%, 41%, 53%, 54%, 53%, 73%, and 75% mean reductions in lesion width, lesion height, maximum sinus mucosal thickness, medium sinus mucosal thickness, minimum sinus mucosal thickness, lesion surface area, and lesion volume, respectively, before and 1 year after endodontic treatment. Regression analysis of pretreatment lesion volume versus percentage of post-treatment lesion volume change revealed a low regression coefficient (R = 16.7%, P > .05), showing a weak linear relationship.

Conclusions: CBCT assessment of changes in periapical lesion and mucosal thickening dimensions may reveal useful information regarding endodontic treatment success.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2016.10.023DOI Listing
February 2017

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after nonotologic surgery: case series.

J Maxillofac Oral Surg 2015 Mar 28;14(Suppl 1):113-5. Epub 2012 Jun 28.

Departments of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Alanya Medical and Research Center, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is one of the most common types of vertigo caused by peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Although head trauma, migraine, long-term bed rest, Ménière disease, viral labyrinthitis, and upper respiratory tract infections are believed to be predisposing factors, most cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are idiopathic. Ear surgery is another cause, but after non-otologic surgery, attacks of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are rare. We describe three cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo attacks after non-otologic surgery (one patient after a nasal septoplasty and two patients after dental endodontic treatment) and discuss the pathophysiological mechanism of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seen after non-otologic surgery, its diagnosis and treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12663-012-0356-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4379224PMC
March 2015

Resistance to fracture of dental roots obturated with different materials.

Biomed Res Int 2015 8;2015:591031. Epub 2015 Feb 8.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey.

The aim of this study was to compare the vertical fracture resistance of roots obturated with different root canal filling materials and sealers. Crowns of 55 extracted mandibular premolar teeth were removed to provide root lengths of 13 mm. Five roots were saved as negative control group (canals unprepared and unfilled). Fifty root canals were instrumented and then five roots were saved as positive control group (canals prepared but unfilled). The remaining 45 roots were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 root/group) and obturated with the following procedures: in group 1, glass ionomer-based sealer and cone (ActiV GP obturation system); in group 2, bioceramic sealer and cone (EndoSequence BC obturation system); and in group 3, roots were filled with bioceramic sealer and cone (Smartpaste bio obturation system). All specimens were tested in a universal testing machine for measuring fracture resistance. For each root, the force at the time of fracture was recorded in Newtons. The statistical analysis was performed by using Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc test. There were no significant differences between the three experimental groups. The fracture values of three experimental and negative control groups were significantly higher than the positive control group. Within the limitations of this study, all materials increased the fracture resistance of instrumented roots.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/591031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4337756PMC
November 2015

Antimicrobial efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride, MTAD and chlorhexidine gluconate mixed with calcium hydroxide.

J Contemp Dent Pract 2013 May 1;14(3):456-60. Epub 2013 May 1.

Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey, e-mail:

Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate whether mixing with calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] affects the antimicrobial action of Octenidine hydrochloride (Octenisept), MTAD and chlorhexidine against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans.

Materials And Methods: Freshly grown cultures of Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans and a mixture of both strains were incubated in agar plates containing brain-heart infusion broth (BHIB). Zones of inhibition were measured at 24 and 48 hours. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, both p=0.05).

Results: Mixing with Ca(OH)2 significantly increased the antibacterial effect of Octenisept (p<0.05), but did not alter its antifungal activity. Only chlorhexidine showed more antibacterial and antifungal efficiency compared to its Ca(OH)2-mixed version (both p<0.05). Mixing with Ca(OH)2 decreased the antibacterial efficacy of MTAD, but increased its antifungal effect (both p<0.05).

Conclusion: These results demonstrate the differential effects of Ca(OH)2 addition on the antimicrobial action of the tested endodontic medicaments in vitro. Ca(OH)2 was as effective as its combination with all of the tested medicaments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5005/jp-journals-10024-1344DOI Listing
May 2013

The effect of temperature and contact time of sodium hypochlorite on human roots infected with Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans.

Odontology 2014 Jan 26;102(1):36-41. Epub 2012 Sep 26.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 2.5 % NaOCl at different temperature and time intervals on Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans-infected human roots. A total of 112 root cylinders prepared from extracted single-rooted humans were infected by E. faecalis (Group A, n = 56) or C. albicans (Group B, n = 56); 3 root cylinders served as negative controls. Both groups were further divided into 6 subgroups according to three contact times (30 s, 1 min, 5 min) with NaOCl at two different temperatures (25 or 37 °C). Microorganism growth was controlled at the 24th and 48th hours. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test. While NaOCl at 25 °C for 5 min was the most effective irrigation regimen to eliminate E. faecalis (p < 0.001), NaOCl at 37 °C for 5 min exhibited significantly superior antifungal properties (p < 0.05). At the same contact times, difference in the temperature of NaOCl did not affect the growth of either E. faecalis or C. albicans. As a result, the irrigation time of NaOCl was more effective than the temperature to eliminate E. faecalis, while pre-heating of NaOCl to 37 °C increased its effectiveness on C. albicans at 5 min contact time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10266-012-0086-xDOI Listing
January 2014

Effect of bleaching agents on sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials.

Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal 2012 Jul 1;17(4):e710-5. Epub 2012 Jul 1.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: To evaluate the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on the sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials.

Study Design: The root canals of extracted human premolars (n=180) were prepared by using System GT rotary files and filled with either gutta-percha+AH Plus or Resilon+Epiphany sealer. In both groups, the coronal 3mm of root filling was removed and replaced with one of the following materials applied as intraorifice barriers (n=30/group): 1. ProProot-MTA; 2. Conventional Glass ionomer cement; and 3. Hybrid resin composite. In each subgroup, intracoronal bleaching was performed using either sodium perborate with distilled water or 35% hydrogen peroxide gel for 3 weeks. The leakage of specimens was measured using fluid-filtration and dye penetration tests. The data were analyzed statistically with One-way ANOVA, Repeated Measures t-test and Independent Samples t-test (p=0.05).

Results: The fluid conductance values of the test groups were not influenced by the type of the bleaching agent, the intraorifice barrier, or the root filling material (all p>0.05). However, the extent of dye leakage was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier material (p<0.05), which showed the following statistical ranking: glass ionomer cement > resin composite > ProRoot-MTA (p<0.05).

Conclusions: The effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel or sodium perborate/distilled water on the sealing properties of tested intraorifice barriers and root filling materials varied conforming leakage assessment. These properties were not affected by using fluid filtration test, while the glass ionomer barrier showed the greatest amount of dye leakage in both gutta-percha and Resilon root-filled teeth.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3476038PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/medoral.17751DOI Listing
July 2012

Effect of sodium ascorbate on bond strength of different adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin.

Aust Endod J 2010 Apr;36(1):12-8

Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sodium ascorbate on bond strength of different adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin. Eighty extracted molar teeth were used in the study. The buccal enamel surfaces were removed to obtain a flat dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in self-curing resin and dentin surfaces were irrigated with NaOCl for 10 min. Half of the specimens were treated with sodium ascorbate for 10 min. The teeth were randomly assigned to four subgroups according to the adhesive systems used (Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, Adper Single Bond 2). Bond strengths were determined with a Universal Testing Machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were statistically analysed using anova at a significance level of 0.05. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the effect of sodium ascorbate application on bond strength of adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The bond strength results were significantly influenced by the application of sodium ascorbate (P < 0.05) and there was a significant difference between the adhesive systems (P < 0.05). Although statistically significant differences were not demonstrated in all adhesive resin groups, sodium ascorbate application after NaOCl treatment improved the bond strength values.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-4477.2009.00184.xDOI Listing
April 2010

Effects of different ceramic and composite materials on stress distribution in inlay and onlay cavities: 3-D finite element analysis.

Dent Mater J 2009 Nov;28(6):661-70

Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

To reduce loss of tooth tissue and to improve esthetic results, inlay and onlay restorations are good treatment choices for extensive cavities in posterior teeth. The aim of this paper was to evaluate, by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis, the effects of restorative material and cavity design on stress distribution in the tooth structures and restorative materials. Two different nanofilled composites and two different all-ceramic materials were used in this study. A permanent molar tooth was modeled with enamel and dentin structures. 3-D inlay and onlay cavity designs were created. Von Mises, compressive, and tensile stresses on the restorative materials, core materials, enamel, and dentin were evaluated separately. On the effect of restorative material, results showed that in the case of materials with low elastic moduli, more stress was transferred to the tooth structures. Therefore, compared to the nanofilled composites, the all-ceramic inlay and onlay materials tested transferred less stress to the tooth structures. On the effect of cavity design, the onlay design was more efficacious in protecting the tooth structures than the inlay design.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.28.661DOI Listing
November 2009

Could digital imaging be an alternative for digital colorimeters?

Clin Oral Investig 2010 Dec 18;14(6):713-8. Epub 2009 Aug 18.

Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey.

This study evaluated the colour parameters of composite and ceramic shade guides determined using a colorimeter and digital imaging method with illuminants at different colour temperatures. Two different resin composite shade guides, namely Charisma (Heraeus Kulzer) and Premise (Kerr Corporation), and two different ceramic shade guides, Vita Lumin Vacuum (VITA Zahnfabrik) and Noritake (Noritake Co.), were evaluated at three different colour temperatures (2,700 K, 2,700-6,500 K, and 6500 K) of illuminants. Ten shade tabs were selected (A1, A2, A3, A3,5, A4, B1, B2, B3, C2 and C3) from each shade guide. CIE Lab values were obtained using digital imaging and a colorimeter (ShadeEye NCC Dental Chroma Meter, Shofu Inc.). The data were analysed using two-way ANOVA, and Pearson's correlation. While mean L* values of both composite and ceramic shade guides were not affected from the colour temperature, L* values obtained with the colorimeter showed significantly lower values than those of the digital imaging (p < 0.01). At combined 2,700-6500 K colour temperature, the means of a* values obtained from colorimeter and digital imaging did not show significant differences (p > 0.05). For both composite and ceramic shade guides, L* and b* values obtained from colorimeter and digital imaging method presented a high level of correlation. High-level correlations were also acquired for a* values in all shade guides except for the Charisma composite shade guide. Digital imaging method could be an alternative for the colorimeters unless the proper object-camera distance, digital camera settings and suitable illumination conditions could be supplied. However, variations in shade guides, especially for composites, may affect the correlation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-009-0329-6DOI Listing
December 2010

Effect of LED curing on marginal integrity of an ormocer-based sealant.

J Dent Child (Chic) 2009 Jan-Apr;76(1):53-7

Baskent University Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the microleakage of a light cured, ormocer-based fissure sealant when photopolymerized with 2 different light emitting diode (LED) curing units and a conventional quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit.

Methods: Thirty freshly extracted, unerupted human third molars from 9 adolescent were randomly assigned into 3 groups (N=10/group). Pits and fissures were acid etched for 30 seconds, rinsed for 15 seconds with an air-water spray, and air-dried. An ormocer-based fissure sealant material (Admira Seal) was applied to all fissures. In group 1, the sealant was photopolymerized with a Smart Light LED curing unit (Dentsply) for 10 seconds. Another LED curing unit (Elipar II) and a conventional QTH curing unit (Hilux) were used in groups 2 and 3 for 10 and 30 seconds, respectively. Specimens were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, sectioned and examined under a stereomicroscope, and scored for marginal microleakage.

Results: Statistical analysis of microleakage scores revealed no significant difference among the groups tested (P>.05, Kruskal-Wallis test).

Conclusion: The tested LED curing units may provide reduction in total application time without comprising marginal integrity of the ormocer-based sealant.
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July 2009

Time-dependent conversion of a methacrylate-based sealer polymerized with different light-curing units.

J Endod 2009 Jan 7;35(1):110-2. Epub 2008 Nov 7.

School of Dental Technology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of conversion of a methacrylate-based sealer (Epiphany; Pentron Clinical Technologies, Wallingford, CT) with regard to the method of photoactivation, distance from the light-curing unit (LCU), and post-curing time. Freshly mixed Epiphany sealer was dispensed into half-pipe-shaped silicone moulds (n = 48), after which the specimens were photoactivated with one of the following LCUs from the coronal aspect: (1) quartz tungsten halogen/40 seconds and (2) light-emitting diode/20 seconds. In each specimen, the degree of conversion was measured at three different locations (coronal, middle, and apical) using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after photoactivation. The amount of conversion was approximately 50% after photoactivation and improved by approximately 10% after 15 days. Conversion of Epiphany was not affected by the type of LCU (p > 0.001) or the distance from the LCU (p > 0.001) but showed a significant increase within time (p < 0.001). These results indicate incomplete polymerization of Epiphany, despite a post-curing time of as long as 2 weeks in vitro.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2008.09.018DOI Listing
January 2009

Treatment of horizontal root-fractured maxillary incisors--a case report.

Dent Traumatol 2008 Dec;24(6):e91-5

Departments of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey.

Traumatic dental injuries often occur to the teeth and their supporting tissues and they are the main reasons for emergency visit to a dental clinic. Management of a fracture depends on its position and the extent of root involvement. Horizontal root fractures are not seen frequently and the treatment consists of reduction and long-term rigid fixation of the coronal segment. The present case demonstrates the successful management of two horizontally fractured maxillary central incisors with a follow-up period of 9 months.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-9657.2008.00679.xDOI Listing
December 2008

Assessment of possible risk indicators for apical periodontitis in root-filled teeth in an adult Turkish population.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2008 Oct 25;106(4):e72-7. Epub 2008 Jul 25.

Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine possible independent risk indicators of apical periodontitis (AP) in root-filled teeth in an adult Turkish population.

Study Design: This study included subjects older than 15 years who had 1 or more root-filled teeth examined at the Baskent University Faculty of Dentistry. A total of 812 root-filled teeth were evaluated in 425 individuals. AP was the dependent variable and age, gender, length and density of root fillings, presence of periodontal problems, posts, localization of tooth, and tooth type were identified as independent variables. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were used in statistical analysis.

Results: AP was detected on 148 teeth (18.2%) in 812 root-filled teeth. According to multiple GEE model, males were more likely to have AP than females. Of the dental variables, length of root fillings, periodontal problems and tooth type were significantly associated with AP.

Conclusions: The present study indicates that to be male and dental variables including length of root fillings, periodontal problems, and molar teeth were significantly associated with AP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2008.06.005DOI Listing
October 2008

Microleakage in overflared root canals restored with different fiber reinforced dowels.

Oper Dent 2008 Jan-Feb;33(1):96-105

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Prosthodontics, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

This study evaluated microleakage in overflared root canals restored with four different types of adhesively-luted fiber-reinforced dowels: DT Light Post (LP), Glassix (GL), Ribbond (RB) and StickTech Post (ST). Forty non-carious, single-rooted mandibular human premolars with straight root canals were prepared using a step-back technique and obturated with gutta-percha using lateral condensation. The restored roots were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). The root canals were overprepared, creating an overflared dowel space, and each dowel was adhesively luted using a total-etched adhesive (Single Bond) and dual-polymerizing luting agent (RelyX ARC). All specimens were thermal cycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C and stored in 2% methylene-blue solution for one week. The teeth were cut horizontally into three consecutive sections: apical (A), middle (M) and coronal (C). Each section was digitally photographed from the occlusal direction under a stereomicroscope. The images were transferred to a PC and stored in TIFF format. For each image, dye penetration was estimated as the ratio of methylene-blue-infiltrated surface divided by total dentin surfaces. The data were compared and statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<.05). The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compute multiple pairwise comparisons to determine differences between the experimental groups (p=.083). Dentin-luting agent fiber-reinforced dowel (FRD) interfaces were evaluated under a scanning electron microscope. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed detachment of the luting resin from the dentin surface in varying degrees in all specimens evaluated. All groups showed considerable leakage at the sections evaluated. Significant differences were demonstrated between LP-RB for the apical and middle sections and between GL-RB, LP-RB and ST-RB for the coronal sections (p<.0083). Among the FRDs evaluated, the individually shaped polyethylene-reinforced dowel (Ribbond) showed the least overall leakage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2341/07-47DOI Listing
April 2008

Comparison of the area of resin-based sealer and voids in roots obturated with Resilon and gutta-percha.

J Endod 2007 Nov 7;33(11):1338-41. Epub 2007 Aug 7.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

The aim of this study was to compare the cross-sectional area of sealer plus voids of Epiphany sealer surrounding root fillings completed with Resilon cones and laterally compacted gutta-percha. The root canals of extracted human mandibular premolars were prepared to a final size of 40 (0.06 taper). The teeth were then randomly assigned into 2 groups (n = 12/group) for the filling procedures in conjunction with Epiphany sealer: group 1, Resilon cones, and group 2, gutta-percha. Horizontal sections were obtained every 1 mm up to 5 mm from the apical foramen. The sections were digitally photographed under magnification, and the cross-sectional area of the root canal and the area occupied by the sealer and voids were calculated, after which statistical comparisons were made. No differences were found between the sealer plus void or void area of Resilon or gutta-percha groups at any level of sectioning (P > .05). Comparisons within each obturation group showed that there was no significant difference between any level of sectioning with regard to the ratio of sealer plus void area or void area to that of the root canal (P > .05). Within the experimental conditions of the present study, both obturating techniques with the Epiphany sealer exhibited similar amounts of sealer and void area, regardless of the apical level of sectioning compared.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2007.06.015DOI Listing
November 2007

Forced eruption and implant treatment in posterior maxilla: a clinical report.

J Prosthet Dent 2007 Feb;97(2):70-4

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

Periodontal disease can result in bone defects that surround periodontally compromised teeth. After the loss of those teeth, remaining defects may compromise successful treatment with dental implants. Forced eruption, induced by applying light orthodontic forces in the coronal direction, provides enhancement of the implant recipient site by enabling the extraction of the periodontally hopeless teeth. This report describes the use of forced eruption to promote the formation of new bone and soft tissue in the resorbed maxillary posterior region, followed by placement of an implant-supported fixed partial denture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prosdent.2006.12.003DOI Listing
February 2007

Invasive cervical resorption: clinical and radiological diagnosis and treatment of 3 cases.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2007 Mar 12;103(3):e65-72. Epub 2007 Jan 12.

Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption. Etiologic factors include trauma, orthodontic treatment, intracoronal bleaching, and inflammation, but invasive cervical resorption is often idiopathic. There may be no external signs of this disorder, and the resorptive lesion is often detected by routine radiographic examination. This article describes the clinical and radiological diagnoses and treatment modalities of invasive cervical resorption in 3 patients. Two of the 3 cases were incidental radiographic findings and the teeth concerned were symptom free. One case was symptomatic due to periodontal infection. Computed tomography (CT) evaluation was performed in the 2 symptom-free patients. Thus, exact size and localization of the resorptive lesions were obtained. In 2 cases, root canal treatment was performed, and in the other case the resorptive defect was sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2006.10.005DOI Listing
March 2007

Microleakage beneath ceramic and metal brackets bonded with a conventional and an antibacterial adhesive system.

Angle Orthod 2006 Nov;76(6):1028-34

Department of Conservative Dentistry, Baskent University Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: To assess microleakage of a tooth-adhesive-bracket complex when metal or ceramic brackets were bonded with a conventional and an antibacterial self-etching adhesive.

Materials And Methods: Forty freshly extracted human premolars were randomly assigned to four equal groups and received the following treatments: group 1 = Transbond XT + metal bracket, group 2 = Transbond XT + ceramic bracket, group 3 = Clearfil Protect Bond + ceramic bracket, and group 4 = Clearfil Protect Bond + metal bracket. After photopolymerization, the teeth were kept in distilled water for 1 month and thereafter subjected to thermal cycling (500 cycles). Specimens were further sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, sectioned and examined under a stereomicroscope, and scored for marginal microleakage for the adhesive-tooth and bracket-adhesive interfaces from incisal and gingival margins. Statistical analysis was accomplished by Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction.

Results: All groups demonstrated microleakage between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces. A significant difference was observed among all groups (P < .05) for the microleakage between the bracket-adhesive interface. Metal brackets exhibited significantly more microleakage than did ceramic brackets between the bracket-adhesive interface with either of the adhesives. Clearfil Protect Bond exhibited results similar to Transbond XT. Clearfil Protect Bond may be a choice of adhesive in bracket bonding because of its antibacterial activity and similar microleakage results with the orthodontic adhesive.

Conclusions: Metal brackets cause more leakage between an adhesive-bracket interface, which may lead to lower clinical shear bond strength and white-spot lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2319/101805-368DOI Listing
November 2006