Publications by authors named "Kamlai Laohaphatanalert"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Study of prebiotic properties of selected banana species in Thailand.

J Food Sci Technol 2020 Jul 5;57(7):2490-2500. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Rajamangala University of Technology Rattanakosin, Nakhon Pathom, 73170 Thailand.

Prebiotics are functional foods with health-promoting properties that are used in many developed countries. Thailand is one of the countries that produces many plants that should have prebiotic properties. In this study, we investigated the potential prebiotic effects of powders obtained from Saba, Pisang Awak Banana and Silver bluggoe in vitro in accordance with their physical, chemical and microbiological properties. These selected plants were found to demonstrate good water-/oil-binding properties. They contained chlorophyll, beta carotene and lycopene and showed good resistance to stomach and small-intestine enzymes. The selected plants were further used to evaluate prebiotic properties by supplementing as a carbon source in culturing broth for growing probiotic bacteria and pathogenetic bacteria. The increase in the number of probiotic bacteria during fermentation of these selected plants correlated with decreased pH. The growth of four strains of probiotic bacteria seemed to be promoted in MRS broth containing these selected plants, but no significant differences in the number of probiotic bacterial groups were detected in response to difference concentrations of all these selected plants. In addition, we noted that a decrease in the number of all four strains of pathogenic bacteria during fermentation of these selected plants correlated with a decreased pH. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of selected plant prebiotics supported probiotic substance production to inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria. In conclusion, we have shown that the addition of selected prebiotic plants, indicating that they should be used as a prebiotic food ingredient, represents a potential alternative to available commercial prebiotics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13197-020-04284-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7270385PMC
July 2020

Characterization of pectin extracted from banana peels of different varieties.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2018 Jun 27;27(3):623-629. Epub 2017 Dec 27.

4Cassava and Starch Technology Research Laboratory, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Pathum Thani, 12120 Thailand.

Pectins were extracted from banana peels of five different varieties using citric acid solution. The chemical characteristics of banana peel pectins were investigated and compared with citrus peel and apple pomace pectins which were extracted under the same extraction conditions to assess the potential of banana peels as an alternative source of commercial pectin. The yield of banana peel pectins ranged from 15.89 to 24.08%. The extracted banana peel pectins were categorized as high methoxyl pectin with the degree of esterification between 63.15 and 72.03% comparable to those of conventional pectin sources from citrus peel (62.83%) and apple pomace (58.44%). The anhydrouronic acid (AUA) content of banana peel pectins varied from 34.56 to 66.67%. Among various banana varieties being studied, pectin from Kluai Nam Wa variety had the highest AUA content (66.67%) which met the criteria for food additive pectin indicating its commercial significance as an alternative pectin source.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-017-0302-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6049672PMC
June 2018

The fine structure of cassava starch amylopectin. Part 2: building block structure of clusters.

Int J Biol Macromol 2010 Oct 1;47(3):325-35. Epub 2010 Jun 1.

Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.

The aim of this work was to analyse the organization of unit chains inside clusters of cassava amylopectin. beta-Limit dextrins of the clusters and partly fragmented clusters (sub-clusters) were isolated previously [Laohaphatanaleart et al., Int. J. Biol. Macromol. (2010) doi:10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2010.01.0049] and were now hydrolysed extensively with the alpha-amylase (liquefying type) of Bacillus subtilis into small, branched building blocks. The blocks were size-fractionated and characterized structurally. The smallest blocks predominated in the clusters. They were single branched and possessed a degree of polymerization (DP) of 5-9. Blocks with DP 10-15 were double branched and constituted the second largest group. The clusters of cassava amylopectin, which were of rather uniform size, possessed typically 7-9 building blocks, and all clusters contained similar size-distributions of the blocks. The inter-block chain length was 7-8 residues. The possible mode of attack by the enzyme between the building blocks is discussed. A model of the building block organization in the clusters is presented, in which the structural roles of different sub-groups of clustered chains are suggested. A three-dimensional model suggests a possible organization of the building blocks inside the amorphous lamellae in the granular starch.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2010.05.018DOI Listing
October 2010