Publications by authors named "Kamil Janikowski"

3 Publications

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Soluble ST2 protein and hospitalizations due to worsening chronic heart failure during a one-year follow-up in a population with reduced ejection fraction.

Adv Clin Exp Med 2017 Sep;26(6):931-938

Department of Noninvasive Cardiology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.

Background: Hospitalizations due to worsening chronic heart failure (CHF) are common. However, the relationship between a single measurement of soluble ST2 protein (sST2) and the necessity of hospitalization in CHF is still unclear.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the association between a single measurement of sST2 concentration and hospitalizations due to worsening CHF during a one-year follow-up.

Material And Methods: The study involved 167 consecutive patients (mean age 63 years, 83% males) with CHF in stable NYHA classes I-III with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 45% (median 29.65%, range 13-45%). Fifty-six variables were analyzed (clinical factors, basic laboratory results on admission, standard 12-lead ECG, echocardiography and coronary arteriography results). Information about hospitalizations due to worsening CHF was obtained during telephone interviews conducted 12 months after discharge from the cardiac ward. In order to define factors associated with hospitalization, uniand multivariate regression analyses were performed.

Results: A total of 53 patients from the study group (38%) were hospitalized due to worsening CHF. They included a higher percentage of males (p = 0.042), higher concentrations of sST2 (p = 0.049), and glucose (p = 0.010). The multivariate analysis (for model χ2 = 17.235; p < 0.001) revealed that glucose and sST2 were independently associated with hospitalization due to worsening CHF during the 1-year observation (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: In patients with stable mild to moderate CHF with reduced EF, a single measurement of sST2 protein and glucose were independent variables for hospitalization due to worsening CHF over a 1-year follow-up period. The defined prognostic model including sST2 and fasting glucose better identified patients without HF-related hospitalizations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17219/acem/63005DOI Listing
September 2017

Thirty-year risk of cardiovascular disease in senior medical students - based on the StudHeart study.

Kardiochir Torakochirurgia Pol 2016 Jun 30;13(2):172-7. Epub 2016 Jun 30.

Department of Cardiology, Chair of Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.

Introduction: Long-term risk functions highlight the need of prophylaxis in youth before the first symptoms of cardiovascular disease (CVD) occur.

Aim: On the basis of data obtained in the StudHeart study, the aim of this report was to evaluate the 30-year risk of CVD based on the risk scale developed by the Framingham Heart Study (FHS).

Material And Methods: Seven hundred and one students aged 22-27 (mean age: 24 ±1.42) from the 5(th) and 6(th) year of the medical faculties of the Medical University of Lodz were included in the study. The StudHeart study was based on an anonymous survey comprising 12 questions. Based on the answers the authors evaluated the 30-year risk of CVD in each respondent using an on-line calculator that allows one to evaluate: general CVD risk including coronary death, myocardial infarction, coronary insufficiency, angina, ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, transient ischemic attack, peripheral artery disease, heart failure and hard CVD risk including coronary death, myocardial infarction and stroke.

Results: Elevated general 30-year CVD risk occurred in 23.18% of students, while hard CVD risk was elevated in 16.91% of respondents. In both cases elevated risk occurred more often in men (general CVD risk: 43.46% male vs. 8.93% female, p < 0.001 and hard CVD risk: 29.33% male vs. 8.19% female, p < 0.001). Elevation of the risk was mainly caused by overweight, obesity and smoking cigarettes.

Conclusions: Based on FHS 30-Year CVD risk, elevated risk occurred in almost one-fourth of students. Prophylactic actions should be performed, especially in men.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/kitp.2016.61059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4971280PMC
June 2016

EuroSCORE II does not show better accuracy nor predictive power in comparison to original EuroSCORE: a single-centre study.

Kardiol Pol 2016;74(5):469-475. Epub 2015 Nov 17.

Medical University of Lodz, Department of Cardiology, Chair of Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery.

Background: EuroSCORE is used to predict postoperative mortality in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Its updated version was published in 2011.

Aim: To assess whether EuroSCORE II (ESII) predicts more accurately postoperative mortality after cardiac surgery in comparison with additive (addES) and logistic EuroSCORE (logES).

Methods: A total of 461 patients (aged 21-88 years, 63.4% of men) who underwent cardiac surgery (December 2010 - June 2011) were included into the prospective research. For each patient ESII, addES and logES were calculated. Accuracy, calibration, and clinical performance of these models were assessed with receiver operating characteristics analyses using the area under the curve and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Out of this population, a group of 300 coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients (aged 42-85 years, 73% of men) was selected and statistically analysed using the same methods.

Results: The mortality rate was 5.21%. Predicted mortality rates were as follows: addES 4.68%, logES 4.57%, and ESII 1.89%; the accuracy was: 0.589, 0.728, and 0.726, respectively. Only logES presented good predictive power (Hosmer-Lemeshow test: c2 = 12.79, p = 0.12). In the CABG patients, the postoperative mortality rate was 5.33%. Predicted mortality rates were as follows: addES 4.69%, logES 4.59%, and ESII 1.88%; the accuracy was: 0.512, 0.691, and 0.687, respectively. In the Hosmer-Lemeshow test also logES presented good predictive power (c2 = 10.72, p = 0.218).

Conclusions: EuroSCORE II did not estimate mortality risk better in comparison to its previous versions, in the entire studied population or in the CABG patients. On the basis of the analysed data, it seems that the closest to the actual risk of death for the Polish population is the EuroSCORE logistic model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/KP.a2015.0215DOI Listing
April 2017