Publications by authors named "Kamalesh Kumar Patel"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prevalence and Determinants of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Women in India: A Secondary Data Analysis.

Indian J Community Med 2021 Jul-Sep;46(3):434-437. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

Department of Statistics, MMV, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Objective: The present study aimed to identify the determinants of adverse pregnancy outcomes (abortion, miscarriage, and stillbirth) among women aged 15-49 years in India.

Methodology: Data for the analysis were taken from the latest survey of the National Family Health Survey 2015-2016. The determinants associated with abortion, miscarriage, and stillbirth among women in the age group of 15-49 years were identified. The analysis was done using adjusted binary logistic regression.

Results: The contributory variables such as age, level of education, type of residence, wealth status, caste, religion, body mass index (BMI), and anemia level were found to be significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes was significantly associated with all the selected predictors.

Conclusion: This study revealed that high prevalence of adverse pregnancy outcomes was found in India. The association between sociodemographic variables and the pregnancy outcomes are attributed to the fact that there is a lack of availability of fundamental health-care services for young women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijcm.IJCM_569_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8575229PMC
October 2021

Differential and Determinants of Neonatal Mortality: A Comparative Study in Northern and Southern Regions of India.

Indian J Community Med 2021 Jul-Sep;46(3):405-410. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

Department of Statistics, MMV, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Background: The Government of India initiated different programs to reduce neonatal mortality. However, the variability of neonatal deaths occurs among states of India.

Objective: This study aimed to identify the differential determinants associated with neonatal deaths in northern and southern regions of India.

Materials And Methods: Bivariate analysis and Cox regression analysis have been performed to evaluate the predictors of neonatal mortality from National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4) data.

Results: For neonatal mortality, mother and child factors became more consistent in the southern region than northern regions of the country, while household factor was almost the same in both regions of India.

Conclusions: Primary intervention is also required to reduce public health problem as neonatal mortality. It should be focused on education of mother, birth interval, age at birth, antenatal care, poverty reduction programs, and proper heath facility to pregnant mothers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijcm.IJCM_425_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8575228PMC
October 2021

Recommendations to scale up dietary diversity data at household and individual level in India.

Diabetes Metab Syndr 2021 Nov-Dec;15(6):102310. Epub 2021 Oct 7.

International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS), Mumbai, 400088, India. Electronic address:

Background And Aims: An attempt to recommend scale up of dietary diversity data at household and individual level for improving the food and nutrition security, the study was conducted with the objective to explore the dietary diversity (DD) and its associated risk factors among reproductive age women in India.

Methodology: A total of 5,48,806 women aged 15-49 years were asked how often they consume various types of food groups (daily, weekly, occasionally, or never). Association between adequate DD and its covariates such as individual and household were measured by using logistic regression.

Results: Most of the population consumed dark green leafy vegetables, milk/curd and pulses/beans. Only 1.7% of women consumed diet with adequate diversity or five or more food groups. Women's educations, gestation status, wealth status, sex of household head, household size, religion, place of residence and land ownership were significantly associated with adequate DD. The percentages of population with adequate DD varies from 7% to <1% in different states of India which shows that good-quality-diet is a major issue in entire country.

Conclusion: There is an urgent need of programs focused on availability of food with maximum diversity at minimum cost in order to reduce maternal and child mortality in India. To reduce geographic variation in achieving adequate DD, new approaches are required in developing multiple interventions to address major preventable causes of DD. Individual state government should also take serious measure to improve the consumption of variety of food groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2021.102310DOI Listing
October 2021

Prevalence and risk factors of anaemia among men: A study based on Empowered Action Group states, India.

Nutr Health 2021 Jun 20;27(2):191-198. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

29777Indian Institute of Health Management Research (IIHMR), Jaipur, India.

Background: Despite various programmes initiated by the Government of India, the nutritional indicators are not encouraging, as several problems like undernutrition, malnutrition and anaemia - still persist in the country, especially in the Empowered Action Group (EAG) states.

Aim: Because of the dearth of studies regarding anaemia among men in India, the present study aimed to determine its prevalence in this population in the EAG states and to analyse its geographical and socio-demographic determinants.

Methods: The study utilized nationally representative, cross-sectional survey data from round 4 of the National Family Health Survey conducted in 2015-16. Bivariate analysis along with binary logistic regression were performed to assess the predictors of anaemia among men in the EAG states.

Results: Around a quarter of the men in the EAG states suffered from anaemia. A similar high-prevalence pattern was observed across the EAG states. Wherein, Bihar and Jharkhand had the highest prevalence of anaemia while Uttarakhand showed the lowest. Age, place of residence, marital status and caste were positively associated with the likelihood of anaemia among men in the EAG states.

Conclusions: Focusing on the EAG states, this study considered the severity of anaemia as a public health problem among men. Strategies to reduce the burden of anaemia among this population are needed. The government should formulate programmes targeting anaemia specifically, and improving the nutritional status among men in general in the EAG states.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0260106020982348DOI Listing
June 2021

Trends in and determinants of neonatal and infant mortality in Nigeria based on Demographic and Health Survey data.

J Biosoc Sci 2021 11 29;53(6):924-934. Epub 2020 Oct 29.

School of Development Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India.

This study aimed to assess the changes in neonatal and infant mortality rates in Nigeria over the period 1990 to 2018 using Nigerian Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) data, and assess their socio-demographic determinants using data from the most recent survey conducted in 2018. The infant mortality rate was 87 per 1000 live births in 1990, and this increased to 100 per 1000 live births in 2003 - an increase of around 15% over 13 years. Neonatal and infant mortality rates started to decline steadily thereafter and continued to do so until 2013. After 2013, neonatal morality rose slightly by the year 2018. Information for 27,465 infants under 1 year of age from the NDHS-2018 was analysed using bivariate and multivariate analysis and the Cox proportional hazard technique. In 2018, infant deaths decreased as wealth increased, and the incidence of infant deaths was greater among those of Islam religion than among those of other religions. A negative association was found between infant deaths and the size of a child at birth. Infant mortality was higher in rural than in urban areas, and was higher among male than female children. Both neonatal and infant death rates varied by region and were found to be highest in the North West region and lowest in the South region. An increasing trend was observed in neonatal mortality in the 5-year period from 2013 to 2018. Policy interventions should be focused on the poor classes, women with a birth interval of less than 2 years and those living in the North West region of the country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021932020000619DOI Listing
November 2021

When COVID-19 will decline in India? Prediction by combination of recovery and case load rate.

Clin Epidemiol Glob Health 2021 Jan-Mar;9:17-20. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Department of Public Health, Indian Institute of Health Management Research, Jaipur, India.

Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 as a pandemic on March 11, 2020. There is sudden need of statistical modeling due to onset of COVID-19 pandemic across the world. But health planning and policy requirements need the estimates of disease problem from clinical data.

Objective: The present study aimed to predict the declination of COVID-19 using recovery rate and case load rate on basis of available data from India.

Methods: The reported COVID-19 cases in the country were obtained from website (https://datahub.io/core/covid-19#resource-covid-19_zip/). The confirmed cases, recovered cases and deaths were used for estimating recovery rate, case load rate and death rate till June 04, 2020.

Results: A total of 216919 confirmed cases were reported nationwide in India on June 04, 2020. It is found that the recovery rate increased to 47.99% and case load rate decreased to 49.21%. Death rate is found to be very low 2.80%. Accordingly, coincidence of the difference of case load rate and recovery rate (delta) will reveal a declination in expected COVID-19 cases.

Conclusion: The epidemic in the country was mainly caused by the movement of people from various foreign countries to India. Lockdown as restricting the migration of population and decision taken by the government to quarantine the population may greatly reduce the risk of continued spread of the epidemic in India. This study predicts that when the case load rate gets lesser than recovery rate, there after COVID-19 patients would be started to decline.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cegh.2020.06.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7308770PMC
June 2020
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