Publications by authors named "Kamal K Singhal"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Fibrosing Mediastinitis Associated With Tuberculosis in Children.

Pediatr Infect Dis J 2021 Apr;40(4):e166-e169

From the Pediatric Pulmonology Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatrics Centre.

Two children developed fibrosing mediastinitis following past tuberculosis disease. Both were microbiologically negative for tuberculosis at presentation. One was treated with steroids and supportive therapy, but developed active tuberculosis with complications. He ultimately succumbed to healthcare-associated infection. The other recovered with steroids, administered along with antituberculosis treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000003049DOI Listing
April 2021

Active toxoplasmosis presenting with polymyositis and pleural effusion in a child.

J Paediatr Child Health 2021 Feb 11. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, Department of Pediatrics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.15390DOI Listing
February 2021

Flexible through rigid bronchoscopy for airway foreign body: A good marriage of convenience!

Pediatr Pulmonol 2021 02 24;56(2):335-337. Epub 2020 Nov 24.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ppul.25167DOI Listing
February 2021

Pediatric Tuberculosis, What has Changed.

Indian Pediatr 2016 Jun;53(6):517-8

Departments of Pediatrics, Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13312-016-0882-4DOI Listing
June 2016

Autohaler vs. metered-dose inhaler with spacer in children with asthma.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 Mar 23;27(2):217-20. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

Department of Pediatrics, Government Medical College Hospital, Chandigarh, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pai.12499DOI Listing
March 2016

Benefit of gluten-free diet in idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis in association with celiac disease.

Pediatr Pulmonol 2011 Mar 21;46(3):302-5. Epub 2010 Oct 21.

Department of Pediatrics, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Lane-Hamilton syndrome refers to the uncommon co-occurrence of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis and celiac disease (CD). Three children aged between 7 and 14 years with IPH were detected to have co-existing non-diarrheal CD. Institution of gluten-free diet in each of the three children resulted in amelioration of the pulmonary symptoms along with improvement of anthropometric parameters and hemoglobin over a short-term follow-up period of 8-17 months. Inhaled/oral steroids and immunosuppressants could be weaned off after dietary exclusion therapy in each of the three children. Gluten free diet should be instituted in all patients diagnosed with Lane-Hamilton syndrome. It ameliorates both the pulmonary as well as the intestinal symptoms although the precise mechanism of the pulmonary response is as yet unclear.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ppul.21357DOI Listing
March 2011

Nutritional evaluation of transgenic cottonseed in the ration of lactating dairy cows.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2010 Mar 24;42(3):431-8. Epub 2009 Aug 24.

Dairy Cattle Nutrition Division, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, India.

The effects of feeding transgenic (Bt) whole cottonseed (WCS) were studied in lactating cows. Twenty multiparous crossbred cows (Karan Swiss x Karan Fries) in early lactation were given a concentrate mixture containing 40% crushed delinted non-transgenic (non-Bt) WCS, 2 kg wheat straw and green fodder ad lib for a 15-day adaptation period. Thereafter, the cows were divided in two similar groups of 10 each on the basis of milk yield, body weight (BW) and date of calving. The non-Bt control group continued on same ration, while for the Bt group the non-Bt WCS was replaced by transgenic WCS, in a feeding trial of four weeks. The diets provided a minimum of 2 kg cottonseed/cow/d. Mean DMI/100 kg BW and milk yield of non-Bt and Bt groups was 3.48 and 3.45 kg and 11.4 and 12.0 kg/d, respectively. Intake of nutrients, digestibility, milk production and body condition score (BCS) did not differ between the groups (P > 0.05), but BW gain was higher (P < 0.05) in the Bt group than the non-Bt group, probably as a result of hoof problem in two cows of non-Bt group, which when compared excluding two animals from each group did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Transgenic protein (Cry1C) was not detected in the weekly milk samples or in blood plasma at the end of the experiment, showing that delinted WCS containing Cry1C protein can safely be fed to lactating cows.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-009-9439-zDOI Listing
March 2010