Dr. Kajal Gupta, PhD - RUSH University Medical Center - Instructor

Dr. Kajal Gupta

PhD

RUSH University Medical Center

Instructor

Chicago, Illinois | United States

Main Specialties: Infectious Disease, Medical Microbiology

Additional Specialties: Microbiology, Immunology, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Cancer biology, Biofilms


Top Author

Dr. Kajal Gupta, PhD - RUSH University Medical Center - Instructor

Dr. Kajal Gupta

PhD

Introduction

My research aims to discover how gut microbiome influences the development and functions of immune and nervous system.

Primary Affiliation: RUSH University Medical Center - Chicago, Illinois , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jan 2016
RUSH University Medical Center
Instructor
Research Proffesor
Jul 2014
George Mason University
Post Doctoral Fellow
Sep 2012
Binghamton University
Post Doctoral Fellow
Jul 2010
University of Notre Dame
Post Doctoral Fellow
Jul 2009
Gujarat University
PhD
Jun 2006
Indian Institute of Scinece

Research Associate

Publications

16Publications

269Reads

715Profile Views

67PubMed Central Citations

Local Vancomycin Effectively Reduces Surgical Site Infection at Implant Site in Rodents.

Reg Anesth Pain Med 2018 Oct;43(7):795-804

From the Departments of Anesthesiology and.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AAP.0000000000000820DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads
3.090 Impact Factor

Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoS Induces Intrinsic Apoptosis in Target Host Cells in a Manner That is Dependent on its GAP Domain Activity.

Sci Rep 2018 Sep 19;8(1):14047. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Department of Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-32491-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6145893PMC
September 2018
8 Reads
5.080 Impact Factor

PseudomonasPuedomonas aeruginosa ExoS Induces Intrinsic Apoptosis in Target Host Cells in a Manner That is Dependent on its GAP Domain Activity

Scientific Reports

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes serious infections in immunocompromised individuals and cystic fibrosis patients. ExoS and ExoT are two homologous bifunctional Type III Secretion System (T3SS) virulence factors that induce apoptosis in target host cells. They possess a GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) domain at their N-termini, which share ~76% homology, and an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPRT) domain at their C-termini, which target non-overlapping substrates. Both the GAP and the ADPRT domains contribute to ExoT’s cytotoxicity in target epithelial cells, whereas, ExoS-induced apoptosis is reported to be primarily due to its ADPRT domain. In this report, we demonstrate that ExoS/GAP domain is both necessary and sufficient to induce mitochondrial apoptosis. Our data demonstrate that intoxication with ExoS/GAP domain leads to enrichment of Bax and Bim into the mitochondrial outer-membrane, disruption of mitochondrial membrane and release of and cytochrome c into the cytosol, which activates initiator caspase-9 and effector caspase-3, that executes cellular death. We posit that the contribution of the GAP domain in ExoS-induced apoptosis was overlooked in prior studies due to its slower kinetics of cytotoxicity as compared to ADPRT. Our data clarify the field and reveal a novel virulence function for ExoS/GAP as an inducer of apoptosis.

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September 2018
3 Reads

Apoptosis and Compensatory Proliferation Signaling Are Coupled by CrkI-Containing Microvesicles.

Dev Cell 2017 06;41(6):674-684.e5

Department of Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA; Department of Immunology/Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA; Cancer Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2017.05.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5533184PMC
June 2017
41 Reads
3 Citations
9.710 Impact Factor

Divide and conquer: the Pseudomonas aeruginosa two-component hybrid SagS enables biofilm formation and recalcitrance of biofilm cells to antimicrobial agents via distinct regulatory circuits.

Environ Microbiol 2017 05 3;19(5):2005-2024. Epub 2017 Apr 3.

Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton Biofilm Research Center, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.13719DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5702475PMC
May 2017
19 Reads
4 Citations
6.201 Impact Factor

Discovery of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides from Varanus komodoensis (Komodo Dragon) by Large-Scale Analyses and De-Novo-Assisted Sequencing Using Electron-Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry.

J Proteome Res 2017 04 24;16(4):1470-1482. Epub 2017 Feb 24.

School of Systems Biology, George Mason University , 10920 George Mason Circle, 1H8, Manassas, Virginia 20110, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00857DOI Listing
April 2017
39 Reads
1 Citation
4.250 Impact Factor

Antimicrobial activity of mosquito cecropin peptides against Francisella.

Dev Comp Immunol 2016 10 26;63:171-80. Epub 2016 May 26.

School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA; National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dci.2016.05.018DOI Listing
October 2016
12 Reads
2 Citations
2.820 Impact Factor

Perioperative high inspired oxygen fraction therapy reduces surgical site infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in rats.

J Med Microbiol 2016 Aug 14;65(8):738-44. Epub 2016 Jun 14.

4​ Rush University Cancer Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA 3​ Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA 2​ Department of Immunology/Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

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http://www.microbiologyresearch.org/content/journal/jmm/10.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.000295DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5756492PMC
August 2016
36 Reads
1 Citation
2.250 Impact Factor

Characterization of Cimex lectularius (bedbug) defensin peptide and its antimicrobial activity against human skin microflora.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2016 Feb 21;470(4):955-60. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110, United States. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2016.01.100DOI Listing
February 2016
16 Reads
2 Citations
2.300 Impact Factor

Short, Synthetic Cationic Peptides Have Antibacterial Activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis by Forming Pores in Membrane and Synergizing with Antibiotics.

Antibiotics (Basel) 2015 Aug 24;4(3):358-78. Epub 2015 Aug 24.

School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics4030358DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4790291PMC
August 2015
17 Reads
2 Citations

Elevated levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP contribute to antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Mol Microbiol 2014 May 9;92(3):488-506. Epub 2014 Apr 9.

Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, 13902, USA.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mmi.12587
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mmi.12587DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4029167PMC
May 2014
15 Reads
17 Citations
4.420 Impact Factor

Antimicrobial tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is activated during an early developmental stage and requires the two-component hybrid SagS.

J Bacteriol 2013 Nov 30;195(21):4975-87. Epub 2013 Aug 30.

Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00732-13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3807491PMC
November 2013
18 Reads
21 Citations
2.810 Impact Factor

Identification, activity and disulfide connectivity of C-di-GMP regulating proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

PLoS One 2010 Nov 30;5(11):e15072. Epub 2010 Nov 30.

Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0015072PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2994820PMC
November 2010
22 Reads
13 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Diversity of arsenite-resistant cocci isolated from Hutti Gold Mine and bioreactor sample

http://www.jstor.org/stable/24110154

Current Science

Arsenite, cobalt, chromium, copper, nickel, molybdenum, selenate and selenite-resistant cocci were isolated from Hutti Gold Mine reactor and processed water samples having extreme physico-chemical characteristics of pH 1.2–8.20, conductivity 3.2–58 mS and arsenic 11.0–1443.0 mg/1. Cultural, morphological, biochemical characters and antibiotic sensitivity of all the four cocci were studied. On the basis of biochemical and Biolog® test, one isolate was identified as Staphylococcus aureus, and two of these were identified as Citricoccus sp. SRHGAs38 and Staphylococcus sp. SRDAs32 using 16S rRNA gene sequence. These isolates could be used for metal removal.

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May 2010
6 Reads

Characterization of arsenic resistant and arsenopyrite oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans from Hutti gold leachate and effluents.

Bioresour Technol 2008 Nov 25;99(16):7514-20. Epub 2008 Mar 25.

Department of Microbiology, School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad, Gujarat 380 009, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2008.02.019DOI Listing
November 2008
12 Reads
1 Citation
4.494 Impact Factor

Interactions of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans with heavy metals, various forms of arsenic and pyrite

10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.20-21.423

Advanced Materials Research

An arsenic resistant ferrous iron oxidizing bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (GenBank no. EF010878) was isolated from reactor leachate. The reactor leachate showed extreme environmental parameters. Ferrous iron concentrations of more than 60 g/L were found to be inhibitory in the presence and absence of arsenite. Ks values of 12.5 and 8.0 g/L ferrous sulphate and Vmax of 0.124 and 0.117 g/L/h/0.8 mg of protein were found in the presence and absence of arsenite respectively. At 14.9 g/L of arsenite and arsenate the culture showed 26.8 and 59.7 % ferrous iron oxidizing activity respectively. Amongst the metals studied, copper was found to be more toxic as compared to nickel and zinc. In the presence of 3.51 g/L nickel or 4.68 g/L zinc, about 30 % biooxidation activity was registered. In the pyrite oxidation study 87, 67 and 64 % of pyrite oxidation was found and 2.02, 3.19 and 5.96 g/L total iron was solubilized with 5, 10 and 20 g/L of pyrite respectively. The isolate was also able to oxidize refractory arsenopyrite gold ore and 0.531 g/L of arsenic was solubilized along with 0.872 g/L of soluble total iron. During this period the numbers of planktonic bacteria increased from 2.4 x 106 to 1.0 x 108 cells/mL.

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July 2007
8 Reads

Top co-authors

Olga E Petrova
Olga E Petrova

Binghamton University

3
Sasha H Shafikhani
Sasha H Shafikhani

University of California

3
Karin Sauer
Karin Sauer

Binghamton University

3
Josef W Goldufsky
Josef W Goldufsky

Rush University Medical Center

3
Julie Liao
Julie Liao

Binghamton University

2
Akanksha Kaushal
Akanksha Kaushal

George Mason University

2
Asokumar Buvanendran
Asokumar Buvanendran

Rush University Medical Center

2
Jeffrey S Kroin
Jeffrey S Kroin

Rush Medical College

2
Jinyuan Li
Jinyuan Li

Harbin Medical University

2