Publications by authors named "Kaja Reisner"

5 Publications

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Progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons through TRP channel-induced cell death.

J Neurosci 2014 Apr;34(17):5738-46

Center for Organelle Research, University of Stavanger, 4036 Stavanger, Norway, Norwegian Center for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, 4011 Stavanger, Norway, Department of Biology and Health Sciences, Pace University, New York, New York 10038, and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032.

Progressive neurodegenerative diseases are among the most frequently occurring aging-associated human pathologies. In a screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutant animals that lack their normal complement of dopaminergic neurons, we identified two strains with progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons during postembryonic life. Through whole-genome sequencing we show that both strains harbor dominant (d), gain-of-function mutations in the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) mechanosensory channel trp-4, a member of the invertebrate and vertebrate TRPN-type of the TRP family channels. Gain-of-function mutations in TRP channels have not been previously implicated in dopaminergic neuronal degeneration. We show that trp-4(d) induces cell death in dopamine neurons through a defined, calcium-related downstream pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4540-13.2014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3996206PMC
April 2014

Trans fat diet causes decreased brood size and shortened lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans delta-6-desaturase mutant fat-3.

J Biochem Mol Toxicol 2011 Sep-Oct;25(5):269-79. Epub 2011 Feb 9.

Department of Biosciences, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio 70211, Finland.

Trans-fatty acids (TFAs) enter the diet through industrial processes and can cause adverse human health effects. The present study was aimed to examine the effects of dietary cis- and trans-fatty acids on the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Cis- or trans-18:1n9 triglycerides (25 μM) caused no apparent changes in the numbers of viable progeny of wild-type N2 animals. However, in fat-3 mutants lacking delta-6-desaturase, the trans-isomer caused modest decreases in lifespan and progeny after three generations. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) profiles were significantly altered in fat-3 mutants compared to wild type but were not altered after exposure to dietary cis- or trans-18:1n9. Genome-wide expression analysis of fat-3 mutants revealed hundreds of changes. Several genes involved in fat metabolism (acs-2, fat-7, mdt-15) were significantly increased by cis- or trans-18:1n9 without discrimination between isomers. These results provide support for the hypothesis that dietary trans fats are detrimental to development and aging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbt.20386DOI Listing
February 2012

Overexpression of SUMO perturbs the growth and development of Caenorhabditis elegans.

Cell Mol Life Sci 2011 Oct 21;68(19):3219-32. Epub 2011 Jan 21.

Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland.

Small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs) are important regulator proteins. Caenorhabditis elegans contains a single SUMO ortholog, SMO-1, necessary for the reproduction of C. elegans. In this study, we constructed transgenic C. elegans strains expressing human SUMO-1 under the control of pan-neuronal (aex-3) or pan-muscular (myo-4) promoter and SUMO-2 under the control of myo-4 promoter. Interestingly, muscular overexpression of SUMO-1 or -2 resulted in morphological changes of the posterior part of the nematode. Movement, reproduction and aging of C. elegans were perturbed by the overexpression of SUMO-1 or -2. Genome-wide expression analyses revealed that several genes encoding components of SUMOylation pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system were upregulated in SUMO-overexpressing nematodes. Since muscular overexpression of SMO-1 also brought up reproductive and mobility perturbations, our results imply that the phenotypes were largely due to an excess of SUMO, suggesting that a tight control of SUMO levels is important for the normal development of multicellular organisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00018-011-0627-4DOI Listing
October 2011

Fatty acid composition and gene expression profiles are altered in aryl hydrocarbon receptor-1 mutant Caenorhabditis elegans.

Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol 2010 Apr 5;151(3):318-24. Epub 2010 Jan 5.

Department of Biosciences, University of Kuopio, 70211 Kuopio, Finland.

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a eukaryotic transcription factor that plays an essential role in neuronal, immune, vascular, hepatic and hematopoietic development. In mammals, AHR induces metabolism-associated genes in response to xenobiotics. AHR is evolutionarily conserved, and the C. elegans AHR ortholog likely shares many physiologic functions with the mammalian version. While the role of AHR in development is known, the molecular basis of AHR action is less well understood. To understand the physiologic role of AHR in C. elegans, a combination of fatty acid profiling, transcriptomics, and phenotyping approaches was used. Fatty acid profiles from L4 larval stage whole animals indicated that C17isoA, C18:1n9t, C20:3n6 and C20:4n6 were significantly increased in an ahr-1 mutant compared to wild-type. Consistent with these changes, we observed a significant 5.8 fold increase in fat-7, and 1.7-1.9 fold increases in elo-5, nhr-49, and mdt-15 gene expression during the L4 stage. The ahr-1(ju145) mutant displayed deficits in growth and development including a reduced number of eggs laid, a higher proportion of dead embryos, delay in time to reach L4 stage, and movement deficits including a fewer number of body bends and a longer defecation cycle. To understand global effects of AHR-1 on transcription, microarray analysis was performed on L1 stage animals. Expression changes (324 under- and 238 over-expressed) were found in genes associated with metabolism, growth, and development. These results indicate a role for C. elegans AHR in regulating fatty acid composition and in contributing to some aspects of development. Since the transcriptional control of AHR targets may be evolutionarily conserved, these results provide a deeper understanding of the molecular actions of AHR in a model invertebrate system that may be informative for higher organisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpc.2009.12.006DOI Listing
April 2010

Mass-spectrometric identification of anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in nematodes.

Chem Biodivers 2008 Nov;5(11):2431-41

Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kuopio, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio.

The purpose of the study was to see if nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis briggsae, and Pelodera strongyloides) produce endocannabinoids; i.e., anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). In this study, AEA and 2-AG were identified as endogenous products from nematodes by using electrospray-ionization ion-trap MS/MS (ESI-IT-MS) experiments operated in the positive-ionization mode. Endocannabinoids were identified by product ion scan and concentrations were measured by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Both AEA and 2-AG were identified in all of the nematode samples, even though these species lack known cannabinoid receptors. Neither AEA nor 2-AG were detected in the fat-3 mutant of C. elegans, which lacks the necessary enzyme to produce arachidonic acid, the fatty acid precursor of these endocannabinoids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbdv.200890208DOI Listing
November 2008
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