Publications by authors named "K Prabha"

37 Publications

Repression of Polyol Pathway Activity by Hemidesmus indicus var. pubescens R.Br. Linn Root Extract, an Aldose Reductase Inhibitor: An In Silico and Ex Vivo Study.

Nat Prod Bioprospect 2020 Dec 7. Epub 2020 Dec 7.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, M S Ramaiah University of Applied Sciences, Gnanagangothri Campus, New BEL Road, Bengaluru, Karnataka, 560054, India.

Development of diabetic cataract is mainly associated with the accumulation of sorbitol via the polyol pathway through the action of Aldose reductase (AR). Hence, AR inhibitors are considered as potential agents in the management of diabetic cataract. This study explored the AR inhibition potential of Hemidesmus indicus var. pubescens root extract by in silico and ex vivo methods. Molecular docking studies (Auto Dock tool) between β-sitosterol, hemidesminine, hemidesmin-1, hemidesmin-2, and AR showed that β-sitosterol (- 10.2 kcal/mol) and hemidesmin-2 (- 8.07 kcal/mol) had the strongest affinity to AR enzyme. Ex vivo studies were performed by incubating isolated goat lenses in artificial aqueous humor using galactose (55 mM) as cataract inducing agent at room temperature (pH 7.8) for 72 h. After treatment with Vitamin E acetate - 100 µg/mL (standard) and test extract (500 and 1000 µg/mL) separately, the estimation of biochemical markers showed inhibition of lens AR activity and decreased sorbitol levels. Additionally, extract also normalized the levels of antioxidant markers like SOD, CAT, GSH. Our results showed evidence that H. indicus var. pubescens root was able to prevent cataract by prevention of opacification and formation of polyols that underlines its potential as a possible therapeutic agent against diabetic complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13659-020-00290-wDOI Listing
December 2020

Characterization and distribution of microplastics and plastic debris along Silver Beach, Southern India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2020 Sep 7;158:111421. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

National Centre for Polar and Ocean Research, Ministry of Earth Sciences, Headland Sada, Vasco-da-Gama 403804, Goa, India. Electronic address:

Microplastics are causing serious environmental threats worldwide. To evaluate the current state of microplastics pollution, 28 sediment samples were examined for microplastics and plastic debris contamination along Silver Beach, Southern India. Visual identification followed by FT-IR spectroscopy was used to estimate the overall distribution and characterization of plastic debris. The results reveal that white-colored (44%) and irregularly-shaped (82%) plastics are prevalent in the study area. Moreover, the dominant polymer in the study area is polyvinyl chloride (79%) followed by polyethylene (14%) and nylon (7%). Based on size fractions, mesoplastics are widely distributed in the beach sediments (65%), followed by microplastics (18%) and macroplastics (17%). The regional sources of plastic debris are tourism and fishing activities followed by storm water runoff through the Gadilam river and wave-induced deposition through high tides. Strict policy measures need to be implemented in recreational beaches like Silver beach to reduce plastic pollution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111421DOI Listing
September 2020

Transcript profiling reveals potential regulators for oxidative stress response of a necrotrophic chickpea pathogen .

3 Biotech 2020 Mar 15;10(3):117. Epub 2020 Feb 15.

1Plant Immunity Laboratory, National Institute of Plant Genome Research, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, 110067 India.

Necrotrophic pathogens experience host-generated oxidative stress during pathogenesis. They overcome such hostile environment by intricate mechanisms which are largely understudied. In this article, reference-based transcriptome analysis of a devastating Ascochyta Blight (AB) disease causing chickpea pathogen was explored to get insights into survival mechanisms under oxidative stress. Here, expression profiling of mock-treated and menadione-treated fungus was carried out by RNA-Seq approach. A significant number of genes in response to oxidative stress were overrepresented, suggestive of a robust and coordinated defense system of . A total 73 differentially expressed genes were filtered out from both the transcriptomes, among them 64 were up-regulated and 9 were found down-regulated. The gene ontology and KEGG mapping were conducted to comprehend the possible regulatory roles of differentially expressed genes in metabolic networks and biosynthetic pathways. Transcript profiling, KEGG pathway and gene ontology-based enrichment analysis revealed 12 (16.43%) stress responsive factors, 25 (34.24%) virulence associated genes, 10 (13.69%) putative effectors and 28 (38.35%) important interacting proteins associated with various metabolic pathways. In addition, genes with differential expression were further explored for underlying putative pathogenicity factors. We identified five genes ST47_g10291, ST47_g9396, ST47_g10294, ST47_g4395, and ST47_g7191 that were common to stress and fungal pathogenicity. The factors recognized in this work can be used to establish molecular tools to explain the regulatory gene networks engaged in stress response of fungal pathogens and disease management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13205-020-2107-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7024074PMC
March 2020

Development of RT-PCR degenerate primers for the detection of two mandariviruses infecting citrus cultivars in India.

J Virol Methods 2020 01 19;275:113753. Epub 2019 Oct 19.

Advanced Centre for Plant Virology Division of Plant Pathology, ICAR- Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110012, India. Electronic address:

Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV) and Citrus yellow vein clearing virus (CYVCV) are the mandariviruses infecting various citrus cultivars in India and around the world. In the fields, it was observed that citrus plants infected by both the viruses and frequently expressed only ringspot symptoms. The ICRSV-specific polyclonal-antibody used in immuno-sorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) could detect only ICRSV in mixed infections. Therefore, the conserved sequences of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) gene of the alphaflexiviruses were exploited for developing a RT-PCR based assay for detection of both the mandariviruses simultaneously, if present. A degenerate primer pair was designed to amplify a ∼435bp fragment by multiple alignments of the RdRP gene sequences of the members of genera Mandarivirus, Potexvirus and Allexivirus. The developed RT-PCR assay was validated for detecting both, CYVCV and ICRSV in mixed infections as well as in single virus-infected citrus plants. The presence of ICRSV or CYVCV or both of them together in such plants were confirmed by using primer pair specific to each of these viruses. Further, the identity of the amplicons was confirmed by sequencing and the virus species were determined with BLASTN analysis. The degenerate primers also amplified the corresponding target sequences of an allexivirus and a potexvirus from the respective infected garlic/ onion and tobacco plants. The use of the degenerate primers for the detection of these virus species of the genus Mandarivirus will be useful in citrus certification programmes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jviromet.2019.113753DOI Listing
January 2020

Genome characterization of citrus yellow vein-clearing virus: limited heterogeneity of viral genomes in infecting different citrus species.

3 Biotech 2019 Sep 30;9(9):348. Epub 2019 Aug 30.

1Advanced Centre for Plant Virology Division of Plant Pathology, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110012 India.

Citrus yellow vein-clearing virus (CYVCV) is a mandarivirus infecting citrus producing yellow vein-clearing symptoms. The leaf samples collected during surveys of different citrus-growing areas in India exhibited diverse symptoms and 40% of the plants were positive for CYVCV in RT-PCR, indicating the wide distribution of the virus in India. It was reported for first time that CYVCV infects kinnow mandarin and sweet oranges and produces chlorotic ringspots symptoms identical to Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV). The complete genome sequences of CYVCV infecting four citrus cultivars have been deciphered through overlapping primers. All the four genomes comprise of 7531 nucleotides excluding the 3' poly (A) tail. The sequence identity of genomes of four CYVCV isolates in the present study ranged from 95.2 to 99.8% with genome sequences of 31 CYVCV isolates available in public domain and the mean genomic diversity was 0.017, indicating low level of heterogeneity. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that CYVCV isolates from India, Pakistan, and Turkey were clustered in the same clad apart from China isolates. The least normalized d/d mean value (0.092) indicated that RdRP region evolved under relatively stronger selection constraints than the other five coding regions of CYVCV. The four intragenic putative recombination events detected in RDP4 program occurred naturally in CYVCV genome, indicating the evolutionary progress of the virus. Tajima's and Fu and Li's parameters were performed using genomic sequences in DnaSP v5 program and the retrieved negative values indicated the presence of limited genetic variability in CYVCV genomes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on molecular characterization of CYVCV from India. It will be helpful in understanding the evolutionary relationship of CYVCV and ICRSV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13205-019-1876-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6717225PMC
September 2019