Publications by authors named "K O Alper"

61 Publications

Case Report: Famotidine for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in COVID-19.

Authors:
Kenneth Alper

Front Med (Lausanne) 2020 23;7:614393. Epub 2020 Dec 23.

Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, NYU Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States.

Famotidine is of interest as a possible treatment for COVID-19, with effects on disease-related symptoms and survival reported in observational and retrospective studies, as well as predictions of binding to potential SARS-CoV-2 drug targets. Published studies of famotidine for COVID-19 have focused on acute illness, and none have reported on neuropsychiatric symptoms. This case study reports on an 18-year-old man who sought psychiatric treatment for depression and anxiety, disruptive interpersonal conflicts, and impairments in attention and motivation following mildly symptomatic illness with COVID-19. The neuropsychiatric symptoms, which had been present for 16 weeks at the time of the initial evaluation represented a significant departure from the patient's previous behavioral baseline. The patient had no prior psychiatric history preceding his illness with COVID-19, and no history of any prior treatment with psychopharmacological medications. Famotidine 20 mg twice daily administered orally was begun without any additional medications. At 1-week follow-up the patient was much improved. Improvement was sustained through 12 weeks of follow-up during which the patient continued to take famotidine without apparent side effects. With progression of the COVID-19 pandemic it has become evident that persistent disease-related symptoms may follow acute COVID-19 and may include neuropsychiatric symptoms. Controlled clinical research on famotidine for COVID-19 should follow, as well as the development of valid and reliable research diagnostic criteria to define and operationalize the features of a putative COVID-19 neuropsychiatric residual.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2020.614393DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7786260PMC
December 2020

One-pot transformation of lignocellulosic biomass into crude bio-oil with metal chlorides via hydrothermal and supercritical ethanol processing.

Bioresour Technol 2019 Sep 17;288:121500. Epub 2019 May 17.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, United States; Joint Institute of Biological Science, Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, United States; Center for Renewable Carbon, Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, Knoxville, TN 37996, United States. Electronic address:

Grape seeds were deconstructed in both hydrothermal and supercritical ethanol media with a combination of two metal chlorides (TiCl:MgCl) to produce bio-oils. The use of metal chloride additives in supercritical ethanol achieved the highest bio-oil yield of 49.2 wt% (300 °C, 30 min). Both the hydrothermal and supercritical ethanol deconstruction with the additives (TiCl:MgCl = 4 mmol:4mmol) produced the bio-oils with a higher heating value (HHV) of 35 MJ/Kg. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the bio-oils showed that the major products in bio-oils from the hydrothermal deconstruction were acids while the majority products in bio-oils form the supercritical ethanol deconstruction were esters. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data of the bio-oils suggested that both hydrothermal and supercritical ethanol deconstruction with metal chlorides significantly reduced the non-condensed OH and oxygenated lignin sub-units in bio-oils; while only supercritical ethanol deconstruction with metal chlorides reduced the aliphatic OH and O-alkylated structures in bio-oils.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2019.121500DOI Listing
September 2019

LSD Administered as a Single Dose Reduces Alcohol Consumption in C57BL/6J Mice.

Front Pharmacol 2018 31;9:994. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Division of Analytical Psychopharmacology, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, United States.

There is a substantive clinical literature on classical hallucinogens, most commonly lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. However, there has been no published research on the effect of LSD on alcohol consumption in animals. This study evaluated the effect of LSD in mice using a two-bottle choice alcohol drinking paradigm. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to ethanol to develop preference and divided into three groups of equal ethanol consumption, and then treated with single intraperitoneal injection of saline or 25 or 50 μg/kg LSD and offered water and 20% ethanol. The respective LSD-treated groups were compared to the control group utilizing a multilevel model for repeated measures. In mice treated with 50 μg/kg LSD ethanol consumption was reduced relative to controls ( = 0.0035), as was ethanol preference ( = 0.0024), with a group mean reduction of ethanol consumption of 17.9% sustained over an interval of 46 days following LSD administration. No significant effects on ethanol consumption or preference were observed in mice treated with 25 μg/kg LSD. Neither total fluid intake nor locomotor activity in the LSD-treated groups differed significantly from controls. These results suggest that classical hallucinogens in the animal model merit further study as a potential approach to the identification of targets for drug discovery and investigation of the neurobiology of addiction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2018.00994DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6127266PMC
August 2018

Heart rate variability analysis in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Mult Scler Relat Disord 2018 Aug 19;24:64-68. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Marmara University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Multiple sclerosis can cause cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. It is assumed that is caused by multiple demyelinating plaques localized in the brain stem and spinal cord. Previous studies have determined this using tilt table test, heart rate responses to Valsalva maneuver and deep breathing and heart rate variability analysis with 24 h Holter monitoring. However there is not a consensus regarding the presence of the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and severity of multiple sclerosis, type of multiple sclerosis and expanded disability status scale. The aim of the study is comparison of heart rate variability between recently diagnosed patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and healthy controls by using 24 h Holter monitoring. Also we intended to investigate relationship between Expanded Disability Status Scale score, Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite scores and cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings and hearth rate variability.

Method: Fifty-one patients with newly diagnosed relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were compared in this study. Patients with multiple sclerosis, who were already under immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive treatment, were excluded from the study. Echocardiography and hearth rate variability analysis using 24 h period Holter monitoring were performed in all of the subjects. Echocardiography was used to detect the presence of cardiac pathology. One multiple sclerosis patient with right ventricular dilatation and mobile intratrial septum was excluded from the study. All the patients underwent cranial and cervical spinal magnetic resonance imaging to determine the relationship between autonomic abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging.

Results: Our results showed that hearth rate variability values were significantly lower in patients with multiple sclerosis when compared with healthy controls: SDNN index (the mean of all the 5 min standard deviations of normal RR intervals during the 24 h period) (59.80 ± 17.33 vs. 67.20 ± 21.28, p = 0,044), the root-mean-square successive difference (rMSSD) (34.40 ± 17.50 vs. 38.25 ± 12.95, p = 0,042), spectral hearth rat variability total power (3738.84 ± 2085.51 vs. 4427.44 ± 1965.71, p = 0,037), spectral hearth rate variability low frequency (852.03 ± 450.54 vs. 1011.75 ± 370.06, p = 0,018). Ten patients (20%) had brainstem lesion, 25 patients (50%) had cervical lesions and 10 patients (20%) had thoracic spinal lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. There was no significant relationship between location of the lesions and heart rate variability analyses. Also there was no significant relationship between hearth rate variability values and Expanded Disability Status Scale score, Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite scores or number of multiple sclerosis attack (p > 0,05).

Conclusion: These findings reveals that our study population with multiple sclerosis had decreased heart rate variability compared to healthy controls. This was reflected by dysfunction of both parasympathetic and sympathetic parameters of hearth rate variability analysis. However, there is no significant relationship between hearth rate variability analysis and the findings on cranial, cervical, thoracic spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings, number of attack, Expanded Disability Status Scale score or Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite scores in patients with multiple sclerosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2018.06.012DOI Listing
August 2018

Pyrolysis of Date palm waste in a fixed-bed reactor: Characterization of pyrolytic products.

Bioresour Technol 2018 Jan 11;247:363-369. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Laboratory of Wastewater Treatment and Recycling, Research and Technology Center of Water, BP 273, 8020 Soliman, Tunisia.

The pyrolysis of several Tunisian Date Palm Wastes (DPW): Date Palm Rachis (DPR), Date Palm Leaflets (DPL), Empty Fruit Bunches (EFB) and Date Palm Glaich (DPG) was run using a fixed-bed reactor, from room temperature to 500°C, with 15°C/min as heating rate and -5°C as condensation temperature, in order to produce bio-oil, biochar and syngas. In these conditions, the bio-oil yield ranges from 17.03wt% for DPL to 25.99wt% for EFB. For the biochar, the highest yield (36.66wt%) was obtained for DPL and the lowest one (31.66wt%) was obtained from DPG while the syngas production varies from 39.10wt% for DPR to 46.31wt% DPL. The raw material and pyrolysis products have been characterized using elemental analysis thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The syngas composition has been characterized using gas analyzer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2017.09.066DOI Listing
January 2018
-->