Publications by authors named "K Mano"

112 Publications

Recurrent membranous nephropathy with a possible alteration in the etiology: a case report.

BMC Nephrol 2021 Jul 6;22(1):253. Epub 2021 Jul 6.

Department of Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871, Japan.

Background: Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R1) and thrombospondin type-1 domain-containing 7A (THSD7A) are the two major pathogenic antigens for membranous nephropathy (MN). It has been reported that THSD7A-associated MN has a higher prevalence of comorbid malignancy than PLA2R1-associated MN. Here we present a case of MN whose etiology might change from idiopathic to malignancy-associated MN during the patient's clinical course.

Case Presentation: A 68-year-old man with nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed with MN by renal biopsy. Immunohistochemistry showed that the kidney specimen was negative for THSD7A. The first course of corticosteroid therapy achieved partial remission; however, nephrotic syndrome recurred 1 year later. Two years later, his abdominal echography revealed a urinary bladder tumor, but he did not wish to undergo additional diagnostic examinations. Because his proteinuria increased consecutively, corticosteroid therapy was resumed, but it failed to achieve remission. Another kidney biopsy was performed and revealed MN with positive staining for THSD7A. PLA2R1 staining levels were negative for both first and second biopsies. Because his bladder tumor had gradually enlarged, he agreed to undergo bladder tumor resection. Pathological examination indicated that the tumor was THDS7A-positive bladder cancer. Subsequently, his proteinuria decreased and remained in remission.

Conclusions: This case suggests that the etiology of MN might be altered during the therapeutic course. Intensive screening for malignancy may be preferable in patients with unexpected recurrence of proteinuria and/or change in therapy response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12882-021-02457-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8258946PMC
July 2021

A randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of a brief computerized anxiety sensitivity reduction intervention for health anxiety.

J Anxiety Disord 2021 May 29;82:102425. Epub 2021 May 29.

Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, USA.

It is estimated that individuals with severe health anxiety (HA) utilize 41 %-78 % more healthcare resources than individuals with identified medical diagnoses. Thus, identifying targets for intervention and prevention efforts for HA that are appropriate for primary care or specialty clinic settings is imperative. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of a single-session, computerized anxiety sensitivity (AS) intervention on AS and HA. Participants were 68 university students (79.4 % female; M = 19.68) with elevated levels of AS and HA. Participants were randomized to either the AS intervention condition or an active control condition and completed self-report and behavioral follow-up assessments at post-intervention, 1-week follow-up, and 1-month follow-up. Results indicated a significant Time x Condition interaction for ASI-3 at each follow-up assessment (all ps < .001), such that individuals in the active condition exhibited greater reductions in AS compared to the control condition. There was no significant Time x Condition interaction for HA at any follow-up. Mediation analyses revealed a significant indirect effect of Condition on changes in HA through changes in AS. No significant effects were observed for behavioral outcomes. Findings suggest that this intervention successfully reduces AS among those who are high in HA and AS and may indirectly contribute to reductions in HA over time through reductions in AS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2021.102425DOI Listing
May 2021

Comparison of the degree of pes planovalgus and muscle mass of the ankle joint and foot muscles between children with Down syndrome and children with typical development.

J Biomech 2021 06 25;122:110482. Epub 2021 Apr 25.

Communityworks Takasaki, 3-30-11 Nakai-machi, Takasaki 370-0852, Gunma, Japan.

We aimed to compare the degree of pes planovalgus and muscle mass of the ankle joint and foot muscles between children with Down syndrome (DS) and children with typical development (TD). We also examined the association of the degree of pes planovalgus with muscle mass of the ankle joint and foot muscles in children with DS and children with TD. The subjects were 24 children with TD (control [CTR] group) and 23 children with DS (DS group). To assess pes planovalgus, the Arch Height Index (AHI) in the standing position was measured. Muscle thickness of the ankle joint and foot muscles was measured using an ultrasound imaging device. The AHI and thickness of the soleus and tibialis posterior muscles were significantly lower in the DS group than those in the CTR group. The thickness of the flexor digitorum longus muscle was significantly greater in the DS group than that in the CTR group. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the thickness of the flexor digitorum longus muscle was a significant and independent factor of the AHI in children comprising the CTR and DS groups. The thickness of the flexor digitorum longus muscle increased with decreasing AHI. The results of this study suggest that the AHI and muscle mass of the soleus and tibialis posterior muscles decrease, while muscle mass of the flexor digitorum longus muscle increases in children with DS. The results also indicate that decreased AHI is associated with increased muscle mass of the flexor digitorum longus muscle in children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2021.110482DOI Listing
June 2021

The wide-ranging clinical and genetic features in Japanese families with valosin-containing protein proteinopathy.

Neurobiol Aging 2021 04 14;100:120.e1-120.e6. Epub 2020 Nov 14.

Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. Electronic address:

Mutations in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene are known to cause various neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we report 8 Japanese patients [6 men, 2 women; median age at onset: 49.5 (range, 35-58) years] from 5 unrelated families with VCP missense mutations. Although 7 of 8 patients were diagnosed with either inclusion body myopathy or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 1 patient showed demyelinating polyneuropathy, which was confirmed by longitudinal nerve conduction studies. Sural nerve biopsy of the patient revealed intranuclear ubiquitin staining in Schwann cells. Three known pathogenic VCP mutations (p.Arg191Gln, p.Arg155Cys, and p.Ile126Phe) were detected. A novel mutation, c.293 A>T (p.Asp98Val), was also identified in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This mutation was predicted to be "deleterious" or "disease causing" using in silico mutation analyses. In conclusion, demyelinating polyneuropathy may be a novel phenotype caused by VCP mutations. The p.Asp98Val mutation was found to be a novel pathogenic mutation of VCP proteinopathy. We believe our cases represent a wide clinical spectrum of VCP mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2020.10.028DOI Listing
April 2021

Effect of a brief cognitive behavioral program on depressive symptoms among newly licensed registered nurses: An observational study.

PLoS One 2020 12;15(10):e0240466. Epub 2020 Oct 12.

Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan.

Depressive symptoms are a serious problem in workplaces. Hospital staff members, such as newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs), are at particularly increased risk of these symptoms owing to their limited experience. Previous studies have shown that a brief program-based cognitive behavioral therapy program (CBP) can offer effective treatment. Here, we conducted a longitudinal observational study of 683 NLRNs (CBP group, n = 522; no-CBP group, n = 181) over a period of 1 year (six times surveys were done during this period). Outcomes were assessed on the basis of surveys that covered the Beck Depression Inventory-I (BDI). The independent variables were CBP attendance (CBP was conducted 3 months after starting work), personality traits, personal stressful life events, workplace adversity, and pre-CBP change in BDI in the 3 months before CBP (ΔBDIpre-CBP). All factors were included in Cox proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates for depressive symptoms (BDI ≥10), and we reported hazard ratios (HRs). Based on this analysis, we detected that CBP was significantly associated with benefit for depressive symptoms in all NLRNs (Puncorrected = 0.0137, HR = 0.902). To identify who benefitted most from CBP, we conducted a subgroup analysis based on the change in BDI before CBP (ΔBDIpre-CBP). The strongest association was when BDI scores were low after starting work and increased before CBP (Puncorrected = 0.00627, HR = 0.616). These results are consistent with previous findings, and indicate that CBP may benefit the mental health of NLRNs. Furthermore, selective prevention based on the pattern of BDI change over time may be important in identifying who should be offered CBP first. Although CBP is generally effective for all nurses, such a selective approach may be most appropriate where cost-effectiveness is a prominent concern.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0240466PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7549829PMC
December 2020
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