Publications by authors named "K M Wilson"

4,894 Publications

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Modelling dielectric elastomer circuit networks for soft biomimetics.

Bioinspir Biomim 2021 Sep 16. Epub 2021 Sep 16.

Institute of Semiconductors and Microsystems, TU Dresden, Nöthnitzer Straße 64, Dresden, Sachsen, 01062, GERMANY.

In order to obtain entirely soft bio-inspired robots, fully soft electronic circuits are needed. It has been demonstrated that basic logic and memory functions can be realized with soft structures by combining multiple dielectric elastomer switches (DESs). A dielectric elastomer oscillator (DEO) can be used as an artificial central pattern generator (CPG) and has been demonstrated driving the crawling movement of a caterpillar inspired robot. This contribution is focused on the modelling of soft electro-mechanical circuit networks like those. It is here reported the building process of a comprehensive model that includes the individual units behaviour and their interactions and can generate a correct prediction. Based on a former model for an inverter-based DEO, the simulation is expanded to a more complex structure, possessing a higher number of components: the digital DEO. The results show a correct prediction of the DEO's behaviour and the possibility to adapt it to different samples. The remaining shortcomings and limitations can be mitigated by the introduction of new materials and processes in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/ac2786DOI Listing
September 2021

Impact of level five lockdown on the incidence of COVID-19: lessons learned from South Africa.

Pan Afr Med J 2021 23;39:144. Epub 2021 Jun 23.

Foundation for Professional Development, Pretoria, South Africa.

Introduction: the level five (L5) lockdown was a very stringent social distancing measure taken to reduce the spread of COVID-19 infections. This study assessed the impact of the L5 lockdown and its association with the incidence of COVID-19 cases in South Africa (SA).

Methods: data was obtained from the National Department of Health (NDoH) from the 5 March to the 30 April 2020. A basic reproductive number (R0) and a serial interval were used to calculate estimated cases (EC). A double exponential smoothing model was used to forecast the number of cases during the L5 lockdown period. A Poisson regression model was fitted to describe the association between L5 lockdown status and incident cases.

Results: a total of 5,737 laboratory-confirmed cases (LCC) were reported by 30 April 2020, 4,785 (83%) occurred during L5 lockdown. Our model forecasted 30,629 cases of COVID-19 assuming L5 lockdown was not imposed. High incidence rates of COVID-19 were recorded in KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga Provinces during the L5 lockdown compared to the other provinces. Nationally, the incident rate of COVID-19 was 68.00% higher in L5 lockdown than pre-lockdown for LCC.

Conclusion: the L5 lockdown was very effective in reducing the incidence of COVID-19 cases. However, the incident rates of LCC and EC were higher nationally, and in some provinces during the L5 lockdown.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2021.39.144.28201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8418176PMC
June 2021

General Versus Regional Anaesthesia for Lower Limb Arthroplasty and Associated Patient Satisfaction Levels: A Prospective Service Evaluation in the Oxford University Hospitals.

Cureus 2021 Aug 9;13(8):e17024. Epub 2021 Aug 9.

Anaesthetics, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, GBR.

Introduction Lower limb arthroplasty is performed under general anaesthesia (GA) or regional anaesthesia (RA). There is increasing evidence of the surgical and anaesthetic benefits of RA. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines advise using either but highlight a lack of data comparing outcomes of RA and GA for these procedures. We conducted a service evaluation, prospectively analysing elective orthopaedic cases performed at the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, UK from 19/11/2018 to 03/04/2019. We aimed to compare data on anaesthetic assessment, intra-operative parameters and patient satisfaction for RA and GA cases. Methods We selected elective patients, aged above 18, undergoing total hip, total knee or unilateral knee arthroplasties. Prospective quantitative and qualitative data were collected using two forms. Firstly, anaesthetists completed a case report recording demographic data, intra-operative details and reason for anaesthetic choice. Secondly a questionnaire gathered patient satisfaction data. This was analysed using descriptive statistics and presented in tables. Results Data for 132 patients were collected over the service evaluation period. After exclusion, 99 patients were included for final analysis; 59 underwent GA and 40 had RA. GA was used predominantly due to patient preference (74.6%). RA was used primarily due to anaesthetic preference (75%); most commonly due to speed of list and duration of operation. Overall patients had low pain scores (0.3/10) and high pre-operative anxiety levels (4.6/10) regardless of anaesthetic. Conclusion Our results show high patient satisfaction with GA and RA for lower limb arthroplasty; however, pre-operative anxiety was common for both. Patient preference and comfort influenced choice of anaesthesia, highlighting the importance of pre-operative counselling and education to facilitate shared decision making, leading to favourable post-operative outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.17024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8425506PMC
August 2021

Se préparer à la prochaine pandémie en créant la « Société canadienne de l’immunisation ».

CMAJ 2021 Sep;193(36):E1446-E1447

Département de médecine (Wilson), Université d'Ottawa; Institut de recherche Bruyère (Wilson); Institut de recherche de l'Hôpital d'Ottawa, Ottawa (Wilson); Société canadienne du sang (Sher), Ottawa, Ont.; Département de médecine familiale (Philpott), Université Queen's, Kingston, Ont.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.210670-fDOI Listing
September 2021
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