Publications by authors named "K M Martin"

3,008 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The development of academic identity in graduate nursing students: An interpretive descriptive study.

Nurse Educ Today 2021 May 4;103:104949. Epub 2021 May 4.

College of Nursing, University of Manitoba, 89 Curry Place, Winnipeg R3R 2N2, MB, Canada. Electronic address:

Background: Mentorship is an important element in the development of academic identity among graduate students in nursing. Although most often occurring within the context of faculty advisor-student relationships, mentorship should extend beyond formal advisor-advisee relationships. Peer mentorship is known to be beneficial for graduate students, yet little is known about how peer mentorship specifically impacts the development of academic identity.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore how peer mentorship, within the context of an international research conference, impacts the development of academic identity.

Design: Qualitative descriptive study. Graduate nursing students from a research-intensive university in Canada were invited to participate in a peer mentorship initiative. Data were collected through reflective journals. Data analysis was conducted iteratively and collaboratively using an interpretive descriptive approach.

Participants: Eight mentees, two peer mentors and five faculty mentors participated in the initiative. With the exception of one faculty mentor, all participants provided reflective journals on their experiences, in response to journal prompts.

Results: Findings centered on five themes: walking through quicksand, navigating a complex academic world, developing academic identity through relationships, intentional cultivation of community, and finding solid ground. Our findings highlight the relational nature of academic identity development, and the significant benefit of providing mentorship to graduate nursing students outside of formal learning spaces.

Conclusions: Given the urgent need to increase the numbers of nurses with advanced research training, it is important that effective strategies like this innovative mentorship initiative, that enhance professional identity development, are integrated into graduate education programs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2021.104949DOI Listing
May 2021

Reply: Speaking Valve Placement: Use of Manometry and Downsizing.

Ann Am Thorac Soc 2021 May 6. Epub 2021 May 6.

Johns Hopkins University, 1466, Baltimore, Maryland, United States;

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.202104-500LEDOI Listing
May 2021

Risk, Racial Disparity, and Outcomes Among Patients With Cancer and COVID-19 Infection.

JAMA Oncol 2021 May 6. Epub 2021 May 6.

Division of Hematology and Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.0768DOI Listing
May 2021

Planning for patient-reported outcome implementation: Development of decision tools and practical experience across four clinics.

J Clin Transl Sci 2020 Apr 6;4(6):498-507. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Introduction: Many institutions are attempting to implement patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures. Because PROs often change clinical workflows significantly for patients and providers, implementation choices can have major impact. While various implementation guides exist, a stepwise list of decision points covering the full implementation process and drawing explicitly on a sociotechnical conceptual framework does not exist.

Methods: To facilitate real-world implementation of PROs in electronic health records (EHRs) for use in clinical practice, members of the EHR Access to Seamless Integration of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Consortium developed structured PRO implementation planning tools. Each institution pilot tested the tools. Joint meetings led to the identification of critical sociotechnical success factors.

Results: Three tools were developed and tested: (1) a summarizes the empirical knowledge and guidance about PRO implementation in routine clinical care; (2) a allows decision tracking; and (3) an simplifies creation of a sharable implementation plan. Seven lessons learned during implementation underscore the iterative nature of planning and the importance of the clinician champion, as well as the need to understand aims, manage implementation barriers, minimize disruption, provide ample discussion time, and continuously engage key stakeholders.

Conclusions: Highly structured planning tools, informed by a sociotechnical perspective, enabled the construction of clear, clinic-specific plans. By developing and testing three reusable tools (freely available for immediate use), our project addressed the need for consolidated guidance and created new materials for PRO implementation planning. We identified seven important lessons that, while common to technology implementation, are especially critical in PRO implementation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/cts.2020.37DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8057386PMC
April 2020

Diminishing Efficacy of Prone Positioning With Late Application in Evolving Lung Injury.

Crit Care Med 2021 Apr 28. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

1 Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. 2 Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. 3 Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. 4 Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. 5 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA. 6 Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA. 7 Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Objectives: It is not known how lung injury progression during mechanical ventilation modifies pulmonary responses to prone positioning. We compared the effects of prone positioning on regional lung aeration in late versus early stages of lung injury.

Design: Prospective, longitudinal imaging study.

Setting: Research imaging facility at The University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA) and Medical and Surgical ICUs at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA).

Subjects: Anesthetized swine and patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (acute respiratory distress syndrome).

Interventions: Lung injury was induced by bronchial hydrochloric acid (3.5 mL/kg) in 10 ventilated Yorkshire pigs and worsened by supine nonprotective ventilation for 24 hours. Whole-lung CT was performed 2 hours after hydrochloric acid (Day 1) in both prone and supine positions and repeated at 24 hours (Day 2). Prone and supine images were registered (superimposed) in pairs to measure the effects of positioning on the aeration of each tissue unit. Two patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome were compared with two patients with late acute respiratory distress syndrome, using electrical impedance tomography to measure the effects of body position on regional lung mechanics.

Measurements And Main Results: Gas exchange and respiratory mechanics worsened over 24 hours, indicating lung injury progression. On Day 1, prone positioning reinflated 18.9% ± 5.2% of lung mass in the posterior lung regions. On Day 2, position-associated dorsal reinflation was reduced to 7.3% ± 1.5% (p < 0.05 vs Day 1). Prone positioning decreased aeration in the anterior lungs on both days. Although prone positioning improved posterior lung compliance in the early acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, it had no effect in late acute respiratory distress syndrome subjects.

Conclusions: The effects of prone positioning on lung aeration may depend on the stage of lung injury and duration of prior ventilation; this may limit the clinical efficacy of this treatment if applied late.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000005071DOI Listing
April 2021