Publications by authors named "K Esser"

328 Publications

Exploring Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for parents of preterm infants.

Paediatr Child Health 2021 Feb 29;26(1):e1-e3. Epub 2020 Feb 29.

Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario.

The start of a parenting journey in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) presents many stressors to parents. Previous research has shown parents of infants admitted to the NICU experience heightened stress, anxiety, and depression. Mental health support varies across Canadian NICUs with mixed results. One promising intervention that has not been explored in the NICU is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a behavioural therapy that has had positive mental health-related outcomes in similar parental populations. ACT differs from previous mental health interventions such as traditional Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) as it involves mindfulness and acceptance to increase psychological flexibility. Increased psychological flexibility is linked to greater emotional well-being, a higher quality of life, and decreased stress, anxiety, and depression. There is a need for research investigating the utility of ACT in improving mental health outcomes for parents of preterm infants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pch/pxaa003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7850279PMC
February 2021

Time of Day and Muscle Strength: A Circadian Output?

Physiology (Bethesda) 2021 Jan;36(1):44-51

Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FloridaMyology Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

For more than 20 years, physiologists have observed a morning-to-evening increase in human muscle strength. Recent data suggest that time-of-day differences are the result of intrinsic, nonneural, muscle factors. We evaluate circadian clock data sets from human and mouse circadian studies and highlight possible mechanisms through which the muscle circadian clock may contribute to time-of-day muscle strength outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/physiol.00030.2020DOI Listing
January 2021

Innovations in Geroscience to enhance mobility in older adults.

Exp Gerontol 2020 12 22;142:111123. Epub 2020 Oct 22.

University of Florida, Department of Psychology, 945 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611, United States. Electronic address:

Aging is the primary risk factor for functional decline; thus, understanding and preventing disability among older adults has emerged as an important public health challenge of the 21st century. The science of gerontology - or geroscience - has the practical purpose of "adding life to the years." The overall goal of geroscience is to increase healthspan, which refers to extending the portion of the lifespan in which the individual experiences enjoyment, satisfaction, and wellness. An important facet of this goal is preserving mobility, defined as the ability to move independently. Despite this clear purpose, this has proven to be a challenging endeavor as mobility and function in later life are influenced by a complex interaction of factors across multiple domains. Moreover, findings over the past decade have highlighted the complexity of walking and how targeting multiple systems, including the brain and sensory organs, as well as the environment in which a person lives, can have a dramatic effect on an older person's mobility and function. For these reasons, behavioral interventions that incorporate complex walking tasks and other activities of daily living appear to be especially helpful for improving mobility function. Other pharmaceutical interventions, such as oxytocin, and complementary and alternative interventions, such as massage therapy, may enhance physical function both through direct effects on biological mechanisms related to mobility, as well as indirectly through modulation of cognitive and socioemotional processes. Thus, the purpose of the present review is to describe evolving interventional approaches to enhance mobility and maintain healthspan in the growing population of older adults in the United States and countries throughout the world. Such interventions are likely to be greatly assisted by technological advances and the widespread adoption of virtual communications during and after the COVID-19 era.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2020.111123DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7581361PMC
December 2020

Exercise mitigates sleep-loss-induced changes in glucose tolerance, mitochondrial function, sarcoplasmic protein synthesis, and diurnal rhythms.

Mol Metab 2021 01 31;43:101110. Epub 2020 Oct 31.

Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.

Objective: Sleep loss has emerged as a risk factor for the development of impaired glucose tolerance. The mechanisms underpinning this observation are unknown; however, both mitochondrial dysfunction and circadian misalignment have been proposed. Because exercise improves glucose tolerance and mitochondrial function, and alters circadian rhythms, we investigated whether exercise may counteract the effects induced by inadequate sleep.

Methods: To minimize between-group differences of baseline characteristics, 24 healthy young males were allocated into one of the three experimental groups: a Normal Sleep (NS) group (8 h time in bed (TIB) per night, for five nights), a Sleep Restriction (SR) group (4 h TIB per night, for five nights), and a Sleep Restriction and Exercise group (SR+EX) (4 h TIB per night, for five nights and three high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) sessions). Glucose tolerance, mitochondrial respiratory function, sarcoplasmic protein synthesis (SarcPS), and diurnal measures of peripheral skin temperature were assessed pre- and post-intervention.

Results: We report that the SR group had reduced glucose tolerance post-intervention (mean change ± SD, P value, SR glucose AUC: 149 ± 115 A.U., P = 0.002), which was also associated with reductions in mitochondrial respiratory function (SR: -15.9 ± 12.4 pmol O.s.mg, P = 0.001), a lower rate of SarcPS (FSR%/day SR: 1.11 ± 0.25%, P < 0.001), and reduced amplitude of diurnal rhythms. These effects were not observed when incorporating three sessions of HIIE during this period (SR+EX: glucose AUC 67 ± 57, P = 0.239, mitochondrial respiratory function: 0.6 ± 11.8 pmol O.s.mg, P = 0.997, and SarcPS (FSR%/day): 1.77 ± 0.22%, P = 0.971).

Conclusions: A five-night period of sleep restriction leads to reductions in mitochondrial respiratory function, SarcPS, and amplitude of skin temperature diurnal rhythms, with a concurrent reduction in glucose tolerance. We provide novel data demonstrating that these same detrimental effects are not observed when HIIE is performed during the period of sleep restriction. These data therefore provide evidence in support of the use of HIIE as an intervention to mitigate the detrimental physiological effects of sleep loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2020.101110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7704425PMC
January 2021

A Role for Exercise to Counter Skeletal Muscle Clock Disruption.

Exerc Sport Sci Rev 2021 Jan;49(1):35-41

Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.

Disruption of the skeletal muscle circadian clock leads to a preferential shift toward lipid oxidation while reducing carbohydrate oxidation. These effects are apparent at the whole-body level, including glucose intolerance, increased energy expenditure, and fasting hyperglycemia. We hypothesize that exercise counters these metabolic disturbances by modifying the skeletal muscle clock and reverting substrate metabolism back toward an optimal substrate balance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JES.0000000000000235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7773215PMC
January 2021