Publications by authors named "Jyotirmoy Halder"

5 Publications

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Multi-Trait Multi-Environment Genomic Prediction of Agronomic Traits in Advanced Breeding Lines of Winter Wheat.

Front Plant Sci 2021 18;12:709545. Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Department of Agronomy, Horticulture & Plant Science, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, United States.

Genomic prediction is a promising approach for accelerating the genetic gain of complex traits in wheat breeding. However, increasing the prediction accuracy (PA) of genomic prediction (GP) models remains a challenge in the successful implementation of this approach. Multivariate models have shown promise when evaluated using diverse panels of unrelated accessions; however, limited information is available on their performance in advanced breeding trials. Here, we used multivariate GP models to predict multiple agronomic traits using 314 advanced and elite breeding lines of winter wheat evaluated in 10 site-year environments. We evaluated a multi-trait (MT) model with two cross-validation schemes representing different breeding scenarios (CV1, prediction of completely unphenotyped lines; and CV2, prediction of partially phenotyped lines for correlated traits). Moreover, extensive data from multi-environment trials (METs) were used to cross-validate a Bayesian multi-trait multi-environment (MTME) model that integrates the analysis of multiple-traits, such as G × E interaction. The MT-CV2 model outperformed all the other models for predicting grain yield with significant improvement in PA over the single-trait (ST-CV1) model. The MTME model performed better for all traits, with average improvement over the ST-CV1 reaching up to 19, 71, 17, 48, and 51% for grain yield, grain protein content, test weight, plant height, and days to heading, respectively. Overall, the empirical analyses elucidate the potential of both the MT-CV2 and MTME models when advanced breeding lines are used as a training population to predict related preliminary breeding lines. Further, we evaluated the practical application of the MTME model in the breeding program to reduce phenotyping cost using a sparse testing design. This showed that complementing METs with GP can substantially enhance resource efficiency. Our results demonstrate that multivariate GS models have a great potential in implementing GS in breeding programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2021.709545DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8416538PMC
August 2021

Genome-wide association analysis permits characterization of Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB) resistance in hard winter wheat.

Sci Rep 2021 06 15;11(1):12570. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Department of Agronomy, Horticulture and Plant Science, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA.

Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB) is an economically important wheat disease caused by the necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum. SNB resistance in wheat is controlled by several quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, identifying novel resistance/susceptibility QTLs is crucial for continuous improvement of the SNB resistance. Here, the hard winter wheat association mapping panel (HWWAMP) comprising accessions from breeding programs in the Great Plains region of the US, was evaluated for SNB resistance and necrotrophic effectors (NEs) sensitivity at the seedling stage. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed to identify single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with SNB resistance and effectors sensitivity. We found seven significant associations for SNB resistance/susceptibility distributed over chromosomes 1B, 2AL, 2DS, 4AL, 5BL, 6BS, and 7AL. Two new QTLs for SNB resistance/susceptibility at the seedling stage were identified on chromosomes 6BS and 7AL, whereas five QTLs previously reported in diverse germplasms were validated. Allele stacking analysis at seven QTLs explained the additive and complex nature of SNB resistance. We identified accessions ('Pioneer-2180' and 'Shocker') with favorable alleles at five of the seven identified loci, exhibiting a high level of resistance against SNB. Further, GWAS for sensitivity to NEs uncovered significant associations for SnToxA and SnTox3, co-locating with previously identified host sensitivity genes (Tsn1 and Snn3). Candidate region analysis for SNB resistance revealed 35 genes of putative interest with plant defense response-related functions. The QTLs identified and validated in this study could be easily employed in breeding programs using the associated markers to enhance the SNB resistance in hard winter wheat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-91515-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8206080PMC
June 2021

The acyltransferase PMAT1 malonylates brassinolide glucoside.

J Biol Chem 2021 Jan-Jun;296:100424. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Biotechnology of Horticultural Crops, TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, Freising, Germany. Electronic address:

Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid hormones of plants that coordinate fundamental growth and development processes. Their homeostasis is controlled by diverse means, including glucosylation of the bioactive BR brassinolide (BL), which is catalyzed by the UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) UGT73C5 and UGT73C6 and occurs mainly at the C-23 position. Additional evidence had suggested that the resultant BL-23-O-glucoside (BL-23-O-Glc) can be malonylated, but the physiological significance of and enzyme required for this reaction had remained unknown. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana malonylation of BL-23-O-Glc is catalyzed by the acyltransferase phenolic glucoside malonyl-transferase 1 (PMAT1), which is also known to malonylate phenolic glucosides and lipid amides. Loss of PMAT1 abolished BL-23-O-malonylglucoside formation and enriched BL-23-O-Glc, showing that the enzyme acts on the glucoside. An overexpression of PMAT1 in plants where UGT73C6 was also overexpressed, and thus, BL-23-O-Glc formation was promoted, enhanced the symptoms of BR-deficiency of UGT73C6oe plants, providing evidence that PMAT1 contributes to BL inactivation. Based on these results, a model is proposed in which PMAT1 acts in the conversion of both endogenous and xenobiotic glucosides to adjust metabolic homeostasis in spatial and temporal modes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbc.2021.100424DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8010461PMC
August 2021

Genome-Wide Association Study Uncovers Novel Genomic Regions Associated With Coleoptile Length in Hard Winter Wheat.

Front Genet 2019 5;10:1345. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Department of Agronomy, Horticulture & Plant Science, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, United States.

Successful seedling establishment depends on the optimum depth of seed placement especially in drought-prone conditions, providing an opportunity to exploit subsoil water and increase winter survival in winter wheat. Coleoptile length is a key determinant for the appropriate depth at which seed can be sown. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of coleoptile length is necessary and important for wheat breeding. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a diverse panel of 298 winter wheat genotypes to dissect the genetic architecture of coleoptile length. We identified nine genomic regions associated with the coleoptile length on seven different chromosomes. Of the nine genomic regions, five have been previously reported in various studies, including one mapped to previously known region. Three novel quantitative trait loci (QTLs), , , and were identified in our study. has a large substitution effect which is comparable to 's effect and could be used to compensate for the negative effect of on coleoptile length. In total, the nine QTLs explained 59% of the total phenotypic variation. Cultivars 'Agate' and 'MT06103' have the longest coleoptile length and interestingly, have favorable alleles at nine and eight coleoptile loci, respectively. These lines could be a valuable germplasm for longer coleoptile breeding. Gene annotations in the candidate regions revealed several putative proteins of specific interest including cytochrome P450-like, expansins, and phytochrome A. The QTLs for coleoptile length linked to single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers reported in this study could be employed in marker-assisted breeding for longer coleoptile in wheat. Thus, our study provides valuable insights into the genetic and molecular regulation of the coleoptile length in winter wheat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2019.01345DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7025573PMC
February 2020

Mining and genomic characterization of resistance to tan spot, Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), and Fusarium head blight in Watkins core collection of wheat landraces.

BMC Plant Biol 2019 Nov 8;19(1):480. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

Department of Agronomy, Horticulture & Plant Science, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA.

Background: In the late 1920s, A. E. Watkins collected about 7000 landrace cultivars (LCs) of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from 32 different countries around the world. Among which 826 LCs remain viable and could be a valuable source of superior/favorable alleles to enhance disease resistance in wheat. In the present study, a core set of 121 LCs, which captures the majority of the genetic diversity of Watkins collection, was evaluated for identifying novel sources of resistance against tan spot, Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), and Fusarium Head Blight (FHB).

Results: A diverse response was observed in 121 LCs for all three diseases. The majority of LCs were moderately susceptible to susceptible to tan spot Ptr race 1 (84%) and FHB (96%) whereas a large number of LCs were resistant or moderately resistant against tan spot Ptr race 5 (95%) and SNB (54%). Thirteen LCs were identified in this study could be a valuable source for multiple resistance to tan spot Ptr races 1 and 5, and SNB, and another five LCs could be a potential source for FHB resistance. GWAS analysis was carried out using disease phenotyping score and 8807 SNPs data of 118 LCs, which identified 30 significant marker-trait associations (MTAs) with -log10 (p-value) > 3.0. Ten, five, and five genomic regions were found to be associated with resistance to tan spot Ptr race 1, race 5, and SNB, respectively in this study. In addition to Tsn1, several novel genomic regions Q.Ts1.sdsu-4BS and Q.Ts1.sdsu-5BS (tan spot Ptr race 1) and Q.Ts5.sdsu-1BL, Q.Ts5.sdsu-2DL, Q.Ts5.sdsu-3AL, and Q.Ts5.sdsu-6BL (tan spot Ptr race 5) were also identified. Our results indicate that these putative genomic regions contain several genes that play an important role in plant defense mechanisms.

Conclusion: Our results suggest the existence of valuable resistant alleles against leaf spot diseases in Watkins LCs. The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers linked to the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for tan spot and SNB resistance along with LCs harboring multiple disease resistance could be useful for future wheat breeding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12870-019-2093-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6839225PMC
November 2019
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