Publications by authors named "Jyoti Mathur"

8 Publications

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A convolutional neural network architecture for the recognition of cutaneous manifestations of COVID-19.

Dermatol Ther 2021 Mar 28;34(2):e14902. Epub 2021 Feb 28.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, dermatologists reported an array of different cutaneous manifestations of the disease. It is challenging to discriminate COVID-19-related cutaneous manifestations from other closely resembling skin lesions. The aim of this study was to generate and evaluate a novel CNN (Convolutional Neural Network) ensemble architecture for detection of COVID-19-associated skin lesions from clinical images. An ensemble model of three different CNN-based algorithms was trained with clinical images of skin lesions from confirmed COVID-19 positive patients, healthy controls as well as 18 other common skin conditions, which included close mimics of COVID-19 skin lesions such as urticaria, varicella, pityriasis rosea, herpes zoster, bullous pemphigoid and psoriasis. The multi-class model demonstrated an overall top-1 accuracy of 86.7% for all 20 diseases. The sensitivity and specificity of COVID-19-rash detection were found to be 84.2 ± 5.1% and 99.5 ± 0.2%, respectively. The positive predictive value, NPV and area under curve values for COVID-19-rash were 88.0 ± 5.6%, 99.4 ± 0.2% and 0.97 ± 0.25, respectively. The binary classifier had a mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 76.81 ± 6.25%, 99.77 ± 0.14% and 98.91 ± 0.17%, respectively for COVID-19 rash. The model was robust in detection of all skin lesions on both white and skin of color, although only a few images of COVID-19-associated skin lesions from skin of color were available. To our best knowledge, this is the first machine learning-based study for automated detection of COVID-19 based on skin images and may provide a useful decision support tool for physicians to optimize contact-free COVID-19 triage, differential diagnosis of skin lesions and patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.14902DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7995139PMC
March 2021

Performance of a deep learning-based application for the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma in Indian patients as compared to dermatologists and nondermatologists.

Int J Dermatol 2021 Feb 11;60(2):e51-e52. Epub 2020 Oct 11.

Department of Dermatology & Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.15242DOI Listing
February 2021

Phytoremediation efficiency of Helianthus annuus L. for reclamation of heavy metals-contaminated industrial soil.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020 Aug 22;27(24):29954-29966. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Banasthali Vidyapith, Rajasthan, 304022, India.

Soil pollution is rapidly increasing due to industrialization and urbanization. Heavy metal pollution raised concern because of its possible impact on plants and humans. Helianthus annuus L. is a good hyperaccumulator plant, used for the removal of heavy metals because of its phytoremediation efficiency. In the present study, we cultivated H. annuus plants in industrial contaminated soil collected from various industries like plastic, paper, dye, and textile of different areas of Jaipur (Rajasthan), Kashipur, Jaspur, and Bajpur (Uttrakhand), India. Plantlets accumulated a different range of Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe, and As (0.62-158.29, 0.8-59.6, 0.81-166.5, 0.09-101.89, 2.06-53.25, and 0.002-2.55 mg kg, respectively) from the industrial soil samples. Heavy metal analysis was done using flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The effects of heavy metals were analyzed by studying the morphological, biochemical, and antioxidant enzymatic analysis. The results revealed that industrial contaminated soil had a significant impeding effect on the plantlets of H. annuus as noticed by the reduction in growth parameters compared to the standard. Furthermore, one-way ANOVA and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied for statistical analysis and to determine the correlation between plant growth parameters, removed heavy metals, and biochemical. Thus, this study will be helpful for the decontamination of highly affected industrial soil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-09233-xDOI Listing
August 2020

Genetic and biochemical variability among Lam. accessions collected from different agro-ecological zones.

Genome 2020 Mar 7;63(3):169-177. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Department of Bioscience and Bio-technology, Banasthali Vidyapith, Rajasthan, 304022, India.

Genomic DNA polymorphism and variation in biologically active components of were investigated by two different techniques: RAPD-PCR and HPLC analysis. The concentrations of phenolic compounds (cinnamic, caffeic, ferulic, and coumaric acids) and the content of flavonoids (rutin) were quantified by HPLC analysis. Among 20 RAPD primers, 13 were selected to generate polymorphic amplicons producing an average of 5028 bands, of which 83.7% were found to be polymorphic among 57 accessions of (MO 1 to MO 57) and one outgroup (ACB 58) from Banasthali region, India. In total, 57 accessions were clustered into five major groups within the dendrogram. The results of this analysis were further confirmed by principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). There was also high diversity in the concentration of active compounds in the collected samples as revealed by HPLC analysis. The data revealed that the content of polyphenolic compounds varied between 0.06 (sample KVKB) and 210.5 mg/kg (sample BG). The results suggest that there is a strong correlation between phytochemical variables and DNA polymorphism. The study concludes that the results of the genetic, morphological, and phytochemical diversity could be used to select the best accessions of for agricultural cultivation and breeding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/gen-2019-0102DOI Listing
March 2020

Identifying Dental Anxiety in Children's Drawings and correlating It with Frankl's Behavior Rating Scale.

Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017 Jan-Mar;10(1):24-28. Epub 2017 Feb 27.

Tutor, Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dental Science, Dharmsinh Desai University, Nadiad, Gujarat India.

Aim: To develop a simple method to assess the level of anxiety by using children's drawings and correlating them with Frankl's behavior rating scale.

Materials And Methods: A total of 178 patients aged of 3 to 14 years were handed out two-page forms which contained three sections on coloring and drawing, along with general information, and Frankl's behavior rating scale for the visit. The three types of drawing exercises given to the patients were geometric copy drawings, coloring a nonthreatening figure, and an empty sheet for freehand drawing.

Results: Out of 178 patients, 60 showed definitely positive behavior, 73 exhibited positive behavior, 37 showed negative behavior, and 8 were definitely negative on Frankl's behavior rating scale; 133 children had none or, 1 stress marker and 45 exhibited 2 or 3 stress markers in their drawings. Chi-square (χ) analysis was done with a 2 × 2 contingency table. Observed χ value was 46.166, which at 1 degree of freedom was much greater than that at 0.995 percentile. Therefore, the result was highly significant.

Conclusion: Children requiring specialized behavioral techniques can be identified by the presence of stress markers in their drawings. This nonverbal activity by itself can have an overall positive effect on the behavior displayed in the dental clinic.

How To Cite This Article: Mathur J, Diwanji A, Sarvaiya B, Sharma D. Identifying Dental Anxiety in Children's Drawings and correlating It with Frankl's Behavior Rating Scale. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):24-28.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5005/jp-journals-10005-1401DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5360798PMC
February 2017

Antimicrobial peptides activate the Vibrio cholerae sigmaE regulon through an OmpU-dependent signalling pathway.

Mol Microbiol 2007 Feb 20;63(3):848-58. Epub 2006 Dec 20.

Program in Immunology, Tufts University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

Vibrio cholerae, an enteric pathogen, is subject to assault by several membrane-acting, host gut-derived antimicrobial peptides (AP). We previously found that a major V. cholerae outer membrane protein, OmpU, confers resistance to polymyxin B and to a bioactive peptide (P2) derived from the human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Here, we report that the alternative sigma factor sigma(E) also plays a critical role in determining V. cholerae resistance to AP and that OmpU and sigma(E) lie in the same pathway. In fact, we found that OmpU is a key determinant of basal sigma(E) expression. We also found that sublethal AP exposure activates sigma(E) and the sigma(E)-mediated periplasmic stress response. sigma(E) is not activated by P2 in V. cholerae cells lacking OmpU or DegS, a periplasmic protease that controls sigma(E) activity. The lack of AP-elicited sigma(E) activation in a strain harbouring a point mutation in OmpU's putative DegS-binding residues provides support for a link between OmpU and DegS-mediated activation of sigma(E). We propose that AP-induced membrane perturbations change the conformation of OmpU to trigger a DegS-dependent sigma(E)-activating cascade. Thus, OmpU appears to act as a sensor component in a signal transduction pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2006.05544.xDOI Listing
February 2007

The Vibrio cholerae ToxR-regulated porin OmpU confers resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

Infect Immun 2004 Jun;72(6):3577-83

Department of Immunology, Sackler School of Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University School of Medicine, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing) is a potent antimicrobial protein that was recently reported to be expressed as a surface protein on human gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the resistance of Vibrio cholerae, a small-bowel pathogen that causes cholera, to a BPI-derived peptide, P2. Unlike in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, resistance to P2 in V. cholerae was not dependent on the BipA GTPase. Instead, we found that ToxR, the master regulator of V. cholerae pathogenicity, controlled resistance to P2 by regulating the production of the outer membrane protein OmpU. Both toxR and ompU mutants were at least 100-fold more sensitive to P2 than were wild-type cells. OmpU also conferred resistance to polymyxin B sulfate, suggesting that this porin may impart resistance to cationic antibacterial proteins via a common mechanism. Studies of stationary-phase cells revealed that the ToxR-repressed porin OmpT may also contribute to P2 resistance. Finally, although the mechanism of porin-mediated resistance to antimicrobial peptides remains elusive, our data suggest that the BPI peptide sensitivity of OmpU-deficient V. cholerae is not attributable to a generally defective outer membrane.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.72.6.3577-3583.2004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC415678PMC
June 2004