Publications by authors named "Justin M Wright"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Moving the Dial on Heart Failure Patient Adherence Rates.

Patient Prefer Adherence 2020 4;14:2407-2418. Epub 2020 Dec 4.

TRD Innovation Group, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ 07936, USA.

Introduction: Heart failure remains a substantive contributor to patient morbidity and mortality rates worldwide and represents a significant burden on the healthcare ecosystem. Faced with persistent physical symptoms and debilitating social consequences, patients follow complex treatment regimens and often have difficulty adhering to them.

Purpose: In this manuscript, we review factors which contribute to low adherence rates and advance potential single- and multi-factor-based interventions. It is hoped that these observations can lead to improvements in managed care of this vulnerable population of patients.

Methods: A narrative review of the primary literature was performed on contributing factors with primary focus on the period 2015-2020 using available databases and search engines. Adherence pain points identified were mapped against a series of potential solutions which are presented.

Results: Enhancement of treatment adherence relies on two approaches viz. single-factor and multi-factor solutions. Single factors identified include electronic reminders, enhanced health education, financial incentives, gamification strategies, community drivers, persona-based modeling, and burden relief of poly pharmacy. Multi-factor solutions combine two or more of the seven approaches offering the potential for flexible interventions tailored to the individual.

Discussion And Conclusion: Heart failure patients with poor adherence have increased mortality, hospitalization needs, and healthcare costs. This review highlights current single-factor and multi-factor adherence methods. Against a backdrop of diversity of approaches, multi-factor solutions cast the widest net for positively influencing adherent behaviors. A key enabler lies in the development and leveraging of patient personas in the synthesis of successful intervention methods. Deployable solutions can also be envisioned in clinical trials where adherence tracking represents an essential component.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S283277DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7733338PMC
December 2020

Beauty in the eye of the beholder: a new species of gecko (Diplodactylidae: Lucasium) from inland north Queensland, Australia.

Zootaxa 2020 Nov 10;4877(2):zootaxa.4877.2.4. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, GPO Box 2583, Brisbane, Queensland 4000, Australia..

The Einasleigh Uplands bioregion of central north Queensland, Australia, harbours a unique suite of reptiles that have begun to receive significant attention in the last 20 years. This has resulted in a number of new reptile species being described, and recognition that others await description. We describe a new species of Lucasium Wermuth, 1965 from the western Einasleigh Uplands. Lucasium iris sp. nov. is genetically distinct and morphologically diagnosable from all congeners by its large size, long and narrow tail, nares in contact with rostral scale, homogeneous body scales, distinct vertebral stripe, and paired, enlarged, apical subdigital lamellae. It is known from low rocky hills in a localised area of the Gregory Range, has the most restricted known distribution of any Lucasium, and is the only Lucasium endemic to Queensland. The new species appears most closely related to L. steindachneri (Boulenger, 1885), based on mitochondrial DNA sequences, but has a colour-pattern more similar to L. immaculatum Storr, 1988. All three of these species occur in the Einasleigh Uplands, but only L. steindachneri is known to occur in sympatry with L. iris sp. nov. In addition to the description of the new species, we present records of Lucasium immaculatum from the Einasleigh Uplands, which represent a significant known range extension.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4877.2.4DOI Listing
November 2020

Digital biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease: the mobile/ wearable devices opportunity.

NPJ Digit Med 2019 21;2. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Clinical & Translational Science Institute, Tufts University Medical Center, 800 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

Alzheimer's Disease (AD) represents a major and rapidly growing burden to the healthcare ecosystem. A growing body of evidence indicates that cognitive, behavioral, sensory, and motor changes may precede clinical manifestations of AD by several years. Existing tests designed to diagnose neurodegenerative diseases, while well-validated, are often less effective in detecting deviations from normal cognitive decline trajectory in the earliest stages of the disease. In the quest for gold standards for AD assessment, there is a growing interest in the identification of readily accessible digital biomarkers, which harness advances in consumer grade mobile and wearable technologies. Topics examined include a review of existing early clinical manifestations of AD and a path to the respective sensor and mobile/wearable device usage to acquire domain-centric data towards objective, high frequency and passive digital phenotyping.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41746-019-0084-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6526279PMC
February 2019

Harnessing the Digital Exhaust: Incorporating wellness into the pharma model.

Digit Biomark 2018 Jan-Apr;2(1):31-46. Epub 2018 Apr 11.

Clinical & Translational Science Institute, Tufts University Medical Center, 800 Washington St, Boston MA 02111 USA.

The increasing availability of devices capable of tracking biomarkers presents major opportunities in contemporary healthcare. Herein we advocate a new role for the pharmaceutical industry to capitalize on these opportunities and in doing so incorporate wellness and patient engagement programs into their standard business models. Medical grade decision making using diagnostic, prognostic, and monitoring biomarkers will require coordinated approaches between the pharmaceutical and technology industries and the careful design of longitudinal clinical studies to validate their efficacy. These studies will also require data capture, archiving, curating and sharing on a previously unprecedented scale, and raise additional concerns with regard to data security and ownership. Concurrently, systems-based approaches to the capture and interpretation of a new class of digital biomarkers are emerging, and hold promise for heightened levels of patient engagement and remote sensing. Collectively, if these new opportunities are approached within the context of the patient-provider ecosystem, major repositioning of the pharmaceutical industry may be possible in the near term.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000488132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6157915PMC
April 2018

Can composite digital monitoring biomarkers come of age? A framework for utilization.

J Clin Transl Sci 2017 Dec;1(6):373-380

Eli Lilly Innovation Center, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Introduction: The application of digital monitoring biomarkers in health, wellness and disease management is reviewed. Harnessing the near limitless capacity of these approaches in the managed healthcare continuum will benefit from a systems-based architecture which presents data quality, quantity, and ease of capture within a decision-making dashboard.

Methods: A framework was developed which stratifies key components and advances the concept of contextualized biomarkers. The framework codifies how direct, indirect, composite, and contextualized composite data can drive innovation for the application of digital biomarkers in healthcare.

Results: The de novo framework implies consideration of physiological, behavioral, and environmental factors in the context of biomarker capture and analysis. Application in disease and wellness is highlighted, and incorporation in clinical feedback loops and closed-loop systems is illustrated.

Conclusions: The study of contextualized biomarkers has the potential to offer rich and insightful data for clinical decision making. Moreover, advancement of the field will benefit from innovation at the intersection of medicine, engineering, and science. Technological developments in this dynamic field will thus fuel its logical evolution guided by inputs from patients, physicians, healthcare providers, end-payors, actuarists, medical device manufacturers, and drug companies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/cts.2018.4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5916505PMC
December 2017

Subcutaneous drug delivery: An evolving enterprise.

Sci Transl Med 2017 Aug;9(405)

Eli Lilly Innovation Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.

Recent advances in subcutaneous drug delivery and device design are transforming the biopharmaceutical sector and improving patient care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aaf9166DOI Listing
August 2017

Medical Clearance for Desert and Land Sports, Adventure, and Endurance Events.

Wilderness Environ Med 2015 Dec;26(4 Suppl):S47-54

Primary Care Sports Medicine, Marymount University, MedStar Medical Group, Arlington, Virginia (Dr Usman).

Endurance events are increasing in popularity in wilderness and remote settings, and participants face a unique set of potential risks for participation. The purpose of this article is to outline these risks and allow the practitioner to better guide the wilderness adventurer who is anticipating traveling to a remote or desert environment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2015.09.005DOI Listing
December 2015

Medical Clearance for Desert and Land Sports, Adventure, and Endurance Events.

Clin J Sport Med 2015 Sep;25(5):418-24

*Central Maine Sports Medicine (A Clinical Division of CMMC), Lewiston, Maine; †Lynchburg Family Medicine Residency, Lynchburg, Virginia; ‡Department of Family and Community Medicine, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, El Paso, Texas; §Family Medicine, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia; ¶Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; and ‖Primary Care Sports Medicine, Marymount University, MedStar Medical Group, Arlington, Virginia.

Endurance events are increasing in popularity in wilderness and remote settings, and participants face a unique set of potential risks for participation. The purpose of this article is to outline these risks and allow the practitioner to better guide the wilderness adventurer who is anticipating traveling to a remote or desert environment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0000000000000228DOI Listing
September 2015

Medical treatment of concussion.

Authors:
Justin M Wright

Semin Speech Lang 2014 Aug 12;35(3):155-8. Epub 2014 Aug 12.

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, El Paso, Texas.

A concussion is a brain injury, a change in function induced by traumatic forces. The incidence of concussion is increasing, likely due to increased awareness and improvement in recognition. Speech and language pathology professionals working in schools may encounter patients who have suffered concussions. At the root of concussion pathophysiology is altered metabolism and an acquired energy deficit. The mainstay of treatment for concussion is cognitive and physical rest, allowing for normalization of the metabolism and correction of the energy deficit. Once recovered, the student may need accommodations to successfully return to school without added difficulty and should follow a return to play protocol to return to athletics safely.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1384676DOI Listing
August 2014

Glass delamination: a comparison of the inner surface performance of vials and pre-filled syringes.

AAPS PharmSciTech 2014 Dec 18;15(6):1398-409. Epub 2014 Jun 18.

BD Medical-Pharmaceutical Systems, One Becton Drive, Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, 07417, USA.

The occurrence of glass delamination is a serious concern for parenteral drug products. Over the past several years, there has been a series of product recalls involving glass delamination in parenteral drugs stored in vials which has led to heightened industry and regulatory scrutiny. In this study, a two-pronged approach was employed to assess the inner surface durability of vials and pre-filled syringes. Non-siliconized syringes were used in order to directly compare glass to glass performance between vials and syringes. The vial and syringe performance was screened with pharmaceutically relevant formulation conditions. The influence of pH, buffer type, ionic strength, and glass type and source was evaluated. In addition, an aggressive but discriminating formulation condition (glutaric acid, pH 11) was used to ascertain the impact of syringe processing. Advanced analytical tools including inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed significant differences in glass performance between vials and syringes. Pre-filled syringes outperform vials for most tests and conditions. The manufacturing conditions for vials lead to glass defects, not found in pre-filled syringes, which result in a less chemically resistant surface. The screening methodology presented in this work can be applied to assess suitability of primary containers for specific drug applications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1208/s12249-014-0167-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4245417PMC
December 2014

Concussion management in the wilderness.

Wilderness Environ Med 2014 Sep 20;25(3):319-24. Epub 2014 Mar 20.

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, TX.

Head trauma accounts for a significant number of injuries in the wilderness setting. Concussions are possible sequelae of falls or encounters with unforeseen obstacles. Although not immediately life-threatening, concussions can be a source of significant short- and long-term morbidity. Diagnosis of a concussion in the wilderness may be challenging as symptoms can often be confused with other conditions, such as altitude illness and hyponatremia. Successful management depends on accurate diagnosis and determination of the severity of symptoms so that appropriate decisions regarding treatment and need for evacuation can be made.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2014.01.004DOI Listing
September 2014

Ear problems and injuries in athletes.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2014 Jan-Feb;13(1):22-6

Sports Medicine Fellowship, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, El Paso, TX.

The ear is an unique organ--the principal structure involved in both hearing and balance. Although not common, problems with the ear may be encountered in specific sporting populations. Common conditions affecting the ear in the athlete include otitis externa, an infection of the external ear; external auditory canal exostoses, or abnormal bony growths in the canal; and otitis media, an infection of the middle ear. Given its position on the head, the ear is subject to trauma, often resulting in an auricular hematoma. Divers, due to pressure changes on descent and ascent, are subject to both ear barotrauma and ear decompression sickness. This article will discuss recognition, treatment, and prevention of these conditions affecting the ear in the athlete.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000020DOI Listing
September 2014

Playing field issues in sports medicine.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2010 May-Jun;9(3):129-33

Crozer-Keystone Health System, Springfield, PA 19064, USA.

The use of artificial turf on playing fields has increased in popularity. Advances in technology have allowed for the development of turf that closely mimics the properties of natural grass. Overall injury incidence does not differ between the two surfaces, but unique injury patterns are apparent between the two surfaces. Differences in shoe-surface interface, in-shoe foot loading patterns, and impact attenuation may provide insight into the different injury patterns. Player perceptions of artificial turf vary and may be related to different physiological demands between the two surfaces. Artificial turf has been implicated in skin infections, but concerns about other health consequences related to the synthetic materials have not been proven yet. Understanding the differences between artificial turf and natural grass will help physicians, athletic trainers, and coaches better care for and train their athletes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0b013e3181df1179DOI Listing
August 2010

Synthesis and protein degradation capacity of photoactivated enediynes.

J Org Chem 2005 Nov;70(24):9789-97

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115, USA.

[structure: see text] The viability of proteins as targets of thermally and photoactivated enediynes has been confirmed at the molecular level. Model studies using a labeled substrate confirmed the efficacy of atom transfer from diyl radicals produced from enediynes to form captodatively stabilized carbon centered aminoacyl radicals, which then undergo either fragmentation or dimerization. To exploit this finding, a family of enediynes was developed using an intramolecular coupling strategy. Derivatives were prepared and used to target specific proteins, showing good correlation between affinity and photoinduced protein degrading activity. The findings have potential applications in the design of artificial chemical proteases and add to our understanding of the mechanism of action of the clinically important enediyne antitumor antibiotics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo051403qDOI Listing
November 2005

Targeting DNA bulged microenvironments with synthetic agents: lessons from a natural product.

Chem Biol 2002 Aug;9(8):925-31

Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Bulged regions of nucleic acids are important structural motifs whose function has been linked to a number of key nuclear processes. Additionally, bulged intermediates have been implicated in the etiology of several genetic diseases and as targets for viral regulation. Despite these obvious ramifications, few molecules are capable of selective binding to bulged sequences. Prompted by the remarkable affinity of a natural product metabolite, we have designed and prepared a series of readily accessible synthetic agents with selective bulge binding activity. Furthermore, by screening a library of bulge-containing oligodeoxynucelotides, correlations between structure and affinity of the agents can be drawn. In addition to potential applications in molecular biology, the availability of these spirocyclic agents now opens the door for rational drug design.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1074-5521(02)00188-6DOI Listing
August 2002

Oxa-enediynes: probing the electronic and stereoelectronic contributions to the Bergman cycloaromatization.

J Org Chem 2002 Aug;67(16):5727-32

Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Efficient routes to three classes of 10-membered oxa-enediynes are presented. The electronic and stereoelectronic contributions to half-lives are supported by density functional theory calculations. One member of this class cyclizes to give an isochroman which binds to and degrades the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo0256888DOI Listing
August 2002