Publications by authors named "Junsu Ban"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Discovery of μ,δ-Opioid Receptor Dual-Biased Agonists That Overcome the Limitation of Prior Biased Agonists.

ACS Pharmacol Transl Sci 2021 Jun 6;4(3):1149-1160. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Research Laboratory, Ildong Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 20, Samsung 1-ro 1-gil, Hwaseong 18449, Korea.

Morphine is widely used in pain management although the risk of side effects is significant. The use of biased agonists to the G protein of μ-opioid receptors has been suggested as a potential solution, although oliceridine and PZM21 have previously failed to demonstrate benefits in clinical studies. An amplification-induced confusion in the process of comparing G protein and beta-arrestin pathways may account for previously biased agonist misidentification. Here, we have devised a strategy to discover biased agonists with intrinsic efficacy. We computationally simulated 430 000 molecular dockings to the μ-opioid receptor to construct a compound library. Hits were then verified experimentally. Using the verified compounds, we performed simulations to build a second library with a common scaffold and selected compounds that showed a bias to μ- and δ-opioid receptors in a cell-based assay. Three compounds (ID110460001, ID110460002, and ID110460003) with a dual-biased agonistic effect for μ- and δ-opioid receptors were identified. These candidates are full agonists for the μ-opioid receptor and show specific binding modes. On the basis of our findings, we expect our novel compounds to act as more biased agonists compared to existing drugs, including oliceridine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsptsci.1c00044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8204323PMC
June 2021

Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus NS 1 Targets TRIM25 to Suppress RIG-I Ubiquitination and Subsequent RIG-I-Mediated Antiviral Signaling.

Viruses 2018 12 14;10(12). Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Fundamental Pharmaceutical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Korea.

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe acute lower respiratory tract disease. Retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) serves as an innate immune sensor and triggers antiviral responses upon recognizing viral infections including RSV. Since tripartite motif-containing protein 25 (TRIM25)-mediated K63-polyubiquitination is crucial for RIG-I activation, several viruses target initial RIG-I activation through ubiquitination. RSV NS1 and NS2 have been shown to interfere with RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. In this study, we explored the possibility that NS1 suppresses RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by targeting TRIM25. Ubiquitination of ectopically expressed RIG-I-2Cards domain was decreased by RSV infection, indicating that RSV possesses ability to inhibit TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination. Similarly, ectopic expression of NS1 sufficiently suppressed TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination. Furthermore, interaction between NS1 and TRIM25 was detected by a co-immunoprecipitation assay. Further biochemical assays showed that the SPRY domain of TRIM25, which is responsible for interaction with RIG-I, interacted sufficiently with NS1. Suppression of RIG-I ubiquitination by NS1 resulted in decreased interaction between RIG-I and its downstream molecule, MAVS. The suppressive effect of NS1 on RIG-I signaling could be abrogated by overexpression of TRIM25. Collectively, this study suggests that RSV NS1 interacts with TRIM25 and interferes with RIG-I ubiquitination to suppress type-I interferon signaling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v10120716DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6316657PMC
December 2018

Activation of RIG-I-Mediated Antiviral Signaling Triggers Autophagy Through the MAVS-TRAF6-Beclin-1 Signaling Axis.

Front Immunol 2018 12;9:2096. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Department of Fundamental Pharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea.

Autophagy has been implicated in innate immune responses against various intracellular pathogens. Recent studies have reported that autophagy can be triggered by pathogen recognizing sensors, including Toll-like receptors and cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate synthase, to participate in innate immunity. In the present study, we examined whether the RIG-I signaling pathway, which detects viral infections by recognizing viral RNA, triggers the autophagic process. The introduction of polyI:C into the cytoplasm, or Sendai virus infection, significantly induced autophagy in normal cells but not in RIG-I-deficient cells. PolyI:C transfection or Sendai virus infection induced autophagy in the cells lacking type-I interferon signaling. This demonstrated that the effect was not due to interferon signaling. RIG-I-mediated autophagy diminished by the deficiency of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) or tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)6, showing that the RIG-I-MAVS-TRAF6 signaling axis was critical for RIG-I-mediated autophagy. We also found that Beclin-1 was translocated to the mitochondria, and it interacted with TRAF6 upon RIG-I activation. Furthermore, Beclin-1 underwent K63-polyubiquitination upon RIG-I activation, and the ubiquitination decreased in TRAF6-deficient cells. This suggests that the RIG-I-MAVS-TRAF6 axis induced K63-linked polyubiquitination of Beclin-1, which has been implicated in triggering autophagy. As deficient autophagy increases the type-I interferon response, the induction of autophagy by the RIG-I pathway might also contribute to preventing an excessive interferon response as a negative-feedback mechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.02096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6143786PMC
September 2019

A novel p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitor suppresses respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus replication by inhibiting virus-induced p38 MAPK activation.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2016 08 23;477(3):311-6. Epub 2016 Jun 23.

Department of Pharmaceutical Science, College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus are leading causes of acute lower respiratory infectious disease. Respiratory diseases caused by RSV and influenza A virus result in serious economic burden and life-threatening disease for immunocompromised people. With the revelation that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in host cells is crucial for infection and replication of RSV and influenza A virus, inhibition of p38 MAPK activity has been suggested as a potential antiviral therapeutic strategy. However, the low selectivity and high toxicity of the p38 MAPK inhibitors necessitate the development of better inhibitors. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel p38 MAPK inhibitor, NJK14047, with high kinase selectivity. In this work, it was demonstrated that NJK14047 inhibits RSV- and influenza A-mediated p38 MAPK activation in epithelial cells. Subsequently, NJK14047 treatment resulted in decreased viral replication and viral mRNA synthesis. In addition, secretion of interleukin-6 from infected cells was greatly diminished by NJK14047, suggesting that it can ameliorate immunopathological responses to RSV and influenza A. Collectively, the results suggest that NJK14047 has therapeutic potential to treat respiratory viral infection through the suppression of p38 MAPK activation, which is suggested to be an essential step for respiratory virus infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2016.06.111DOI Listing
August 2016
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