Publications by authors named "Junjing Xue"

3 Publications

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Effects of dietary tributyrin and physterol ester supplementation on growth performance, intestinal morphology, microbiota and metabolites in weaned piglets.

J Appl Microbiol 2021 Oct 27. Epub 2021 Oct 27.

College of Animal Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University, Hunan Co-Innovation of Animal Production Safety, Changsha, Hunan, China.

Aim: This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary tributyrin (TB) and physterol ester (PSE) supplementation on the growth performance and intestinal health of weaned piglets.

Methods And Results: Ninety-six piglets were randomly allocated to one of four groups, including a control group (basal diet), TB group (basal diet + 1500 g t  TB), PSE group (basal diet + 300 g t PSE) and TB + PSE group (basal diet + 1500 g t  TB + 300 g t PSE). All groups had eight replicates with three piglets per replicate. The experiment lasted for 28 days. The results showed that dietary TB supplementation increased (p < 0.05) average daily feed intake and average daily gain, as well as the acetate and butyrate concentration in ileum, and dietary PSE supplementation decreased (p < 0.05) the ratio of feed to gain (F/G) on days 1-14 of the trial. Dietary TB or PSE alone supplementation improved the ratio of villus height to crypt depth (VH/CD) and the expression level of Occludin in ileum. The linear discriminant analysis effect size analysis identified eight biomarkers in the control group, 18 in the TB + PSE group, two in the PSE group in ileum respectively. Correlation analysis showed that the relative abundances of Enterococcus, and Streptococcus were positively correlated (p < 0.05) with propionate concentration, while the relative abundance of Clostridium_sensu_stricto_1 was negatively correlated (p < 0.05) with acetate concentration in ileum.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that dietary TB or PSE alone supplementation could alter the growth performance, intestinal morphology, microbiota community and metabolites of weaned piglets.

Significance And Impact Of The Study: Weaning stress is a major cause of slow growth and increased diarrhoea in piglets. This study demonstrated that dietary TB and PSE presented a beneficial role in growth performance and gut health via regulating intestinal morphology, microbiota composition and metabolites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jam.15321DOI Listing
October 2021

Dietary Supplementation of EGF Ameliorates the Negatively Effects of LPS on Early-Weaning Piglets: From Views of Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Microelement Absorption and Possible Mechanisms.

Animals (Basel) 2021 May 28;11(6). Epub 2021 May 28.

College of Animal Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University, No. 1 Nongda Road, Furong District, Changsha 410128, China.

Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays an important role in nutrients absorption. However, whether it can be an effective additive to improve the growth performance and nutrients absorption in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged early weaning piglets is still unknown. A 14-days trial was conducted to investigate how EGF attenuates the effect of LPS on the growth performance, nutrient digestibility, microelement absorption of early-weaned pigs, and study the underlying mechanism. A total of 48 early weaned piglets, aged 25 days, were randomly distributed to four groups (control, EGF, LPS and EGF + LPS groups) consisting of a 2 × 2 factorial design. The main factors were the level of LPS (H = high LPS: 100 μg/kg body weight; Z = low LPS: 0 μg/kg body weight) and EGF (H = high EGF: 2 mg/kg diet; Z = low EGF: 0 mg/kg diet). Each group had four replicates and each replicate consisted of three piglets. The results showed that piglets injected with H level significantly decreased the average daily gain (ADG), and significantly increased the feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared with the piglets injected with Z level, while piglets fed H level significantly increased the average daily feed intake (ADFI) compared with the piglets fed Z level ( < 0.05). Piglets injected with H level significantly decreased the apparent digestibility of crude fat compared with the piglets injected with Z level ( < 0.05). Piglets injected with H level significantly increased the concentration of most microelements in the gastrointestinal tract chyme and feces, and significantly decreased the expression levels of most microelement transport-relative genes in the mucosa of gastrointestinal tissues compared with the piglets injected with Z level ( < 0.05). Piglets fed H level significantly decreased the concentration of microelement in the gastrointestinal tract chyme and feces, and significantly increased the expression levels of the microelement transport-relative genes in the mucosa of gastrointestinal tissues compared with the piglets fed Z level ( < 0.05). In conclusion, dietary EGF could attenuate the negative effect of LPS exposure on the apparent digestibility of crude fat and microelement absorption of early-weaning piglets. EGF and LPS influenced the absorption of essential trace element through changing the expression levels of microelement transport-relative genes in the mucosa of gastrointestinal tissues. In the early weaning piglets, EGF can be used as an additive to increase the essential trace elements absorption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani11061598DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8227379PMC
May 2021

Mechanistic insight into the gut microbiome and its interaction with host immunity and inflammation.

Anim Nutr 2020 Dec 3;6(4):421-428. Epub 2020 Oct 3.

College of Animal Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan, 410128, China.

The intestinal tract is a host to 100 trillion of microbes that have co-evolved with mammals over the millennia. These commensal organisms are critical to the host survival. The roles that symbiotic microorganisms play in the digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients have been clearly demonstrated. Additionally, commensals are indispensable in regulating host immunity. This is evidenced by the poorly developed gut immune system of germ-free mice, which can be corrected by transplantation of specific commensal bacteria. Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism of host-microbial interaction have provided the basis for this interaction. This paper reviews some of these key studies, with a specific focus on the effect of the microbiome on the immune organ development, nonspecific immunity, specific immunity, and inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aninu.2020.05.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7750791PMC
December 2020
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