Publications by authors named "Jun-Ying Huang"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of Sleep-Disordered Breathing During Rapid Eye Movement Sleep and Non-Rapid Eye Movement sleep on Acute Ischemic Stroke.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2021 Aug 12;30(8):105913. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, China; Department of Neurology, Taicang Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, The first People's Hospital of Taicang, Taicang 215400, China; Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Neuropsychiatric Diseases and Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China. Electronic address:

Objectives: Sleep-disordered breathing adversely impacts stroke outcomes. We investigated whether sleep-disordered breathing during rapid eye movement sleep and non-rapid eye movement sleep differentially influenced stroke outcomes.

Materials And Methods: Acute ischemic stroke patients who finished polysomnography within 14 days of stroke onset from April 2010 to August 2018 were reviewed. Patients were divided into four groups according to apnea-hypopnea index during rapid eye movement sleep and non-rapid eye movement sleep. The modified Rankin Scale was used to evaluate short-term outcome. During January and April 2019, another follow-up was performed for long-term outcomes, including stroke-specific quality-of-life scale, modified Rankin Scale, stroke recurrence and death.

Results: Of 140 patients reviewed, 109 were finally recruited. Although patients with sleep-disordered breathing during non-rapid eye movement sleep only and with sleep-disordered breathing during both rapid eye movement sleep and non-rapid eye movement sleep had higher apnea-hypopnea indices and more disrupted sleep structures, short-term and long-term outcomes did not significantly different between four groups. In Logistic regression analysis, apnea-hypopnea index (p = 0.013, OR 1.023, 95%CI 1.005-1.042) was found independently associated with short-term outcome. Rapid eye movement sleep latency (p = 0.045, OR 0.994, 95%CI 0.987-1.000) was found independently associated with quality of life. Apnea-hypopnea indices during rapid eye movement sleep or non-rapid eye movement sleep were not significantly associated with short-term or long-term outcomes.

Conclusions: Apnea-hypopnea index is an independent risk factor of short-term outcome of acute ischemic stroke while sleep-disordered breathing during rapid eye movement sleep and non-rapid eye movement sleep do not affect stroke outcomes differently.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2021.105913DOI Listing
August 2021

Reduced cortical arousability to nocturnal apneic episodes in patients with wake-up ischemic stroke.

Sleep Med 2020 02 19;66:252-258. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

Department of Neurology, Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, China; Department of Sleeping Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004, China; Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Neuropsychiatric Diseases, Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China. Electronic address:

Study Objectives: Sleep breathing disorders (SBD) have been linked to wake-up stroke (WUS). Respiratory arousals have an important role in responding to danger during sleep, yet currently no studies have investigated respiratory arousability in WUS. In this study, we used a clinical tool to predict low respiratory arousal threshold (ArTH), and then compared respiratory arousability in patients with WUS and non-WUS.

Methods: We enrolled 119 patients with acute ischemic stroke and assigned them into WUS (n = 34) and non-WUS (n = 85) groups. All participants underwent polysomnography (PSG) during the acute phase of stroke. The respiratory ArTH predictive tool assigns one point for each of the following: apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 30/h, nadir oxygen saturation (SaO) > 82.5%, and fraction of hypopneas > 58.3%. An ArTH score ≥2 represents low respiratory ArTH.

Results: Our results reconfirmed the association between moderate-to-severe sleep apnea syndrome and WUS (OR 2.879, 95% CI 1.17-7.089, p = 0.021). Significantly fewer participants with obstructive sleep apnea (AHI ≥ 5/h) had low respiratory ArTH in the WUS group than in the non-WUS group (34.8% vs. 68.1%, respectively, p = 0.008). High respiratory ArTH was independently associated with WUS (OR 5.556, 95% CI 1.959-15.761, p = 0.001).

Conclusions: The correlation between SBD and WUS suggests that sleep apnea might induce acute physiological changes that trigger the onset of stroke. We show that reduced respiratory arousability is associated with WUS, and hypothesize that reduced cortical capability to generate respiratory arousal may have a role in triggering stroke during sleep.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2019.09.007DOI Listing
February 2020

Association of homocysteine, folate, and white matter hyperintensities in Parkinson's patients with different motor phenotypes.

Neurol Sci 2019 Sep 4;40(9):1855-1863. Epub 2019 May 4.

Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, China.

Objective: To investigate the association of homocysteine (Hcy), folate, and white matter hyperintensities in Parkinson's disease (PD) with different motor phenotypes.

Methods: Of the PD patients, 176 were included. Based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the PD patients were classified into postural instability gait disorder (PIGD) and non-PIGD phenotypes. According to the Fazekas score, patients were divided into the none/mild white matter hyperintensity (WMH) group and the moderate/severe WMH group. The relationship of Hcy, folate, and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), and the motor phenotype of PD were analyzed.

Results: PD-PIGD patients had higher proportion of moderate/severe WMHs, Hcy levels, and lower folate levels than PD-non-PIGD patients (p all ≤ 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, patients with both PD-PIGD and moderate/severe WMHs had the highest Hcy and lowest folate levels compared with others. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that age, folate, and Hcy were independent risk factors for WMHs. In an a priori-determined stratified analysis, after adjustment for confounding factors, the odds ratio of WMHs was 8.01 (95% CI 2.700-23.767, p trend = 0.001) in the patients with Hcy levels in the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile and 16.81 (95% CI 4.74-59.65, p trend < 0.001) in the patients with folate levels in the lowest quintile compared with the highest quintile.

Conclusions: Our data showed a close association between WMHs and Hcy, folate especially in PD-PIGD patients. It can be speculated that higher Hcy and lower folate probably played important roles in the development of WMHs and motor heterogeneity in PD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-019-03906-3DOI Listing
September 2019

Cognitive impairment and sleep disturbances after minor ischemic stroke.

Sleep Breath 2019 Jun 25;23(2):455-462. Epub 2018 Aug 25.

Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, 215004, China.

Purpose: Post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) is common among stroke survivors, although its risk factors are not well understood. Here, we assessed cognitive function in patients within 14 days after minor stroke and investigated the risk factors of PSCI, including sleep-related factors.

Methods: Patients with minor acute ischemic stroke (n = 86) were continuously recruited from November 2015 to October 2016. Demographic and clinical data were collected, and cognitive assessment and polysomnography were performed. Based on their cognitive performance, stroke patients were divided into PSCI and no PSCI groups. Age-, sex-, and education-matched participants (n = 36) were included as a healthy control (HC) group.

Results: Stroke patients showed impairments in multiple cognitive domains relative to HC participants (p < 0.01). Among stroke patients, the prevalence of PSCI and obstructive sleep apnea was 81.4 and 74.4%, respectively. Impairments in attention and working memory (87.1%) and executive function (84.3%) were the most common among stroke patients. Compared with no PSCI patients, PSCI patients showed a higher prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (50.0 vs. 80.0%, p = 0.030) and shorter total sleep time (435.1 ± 104.0 vs. 347.3 ± 98.1 min, p = 0.002). Logistic regression analysis showed that education duration, total sleep time, and lowest SaO were independent risk factors for PSCI.

Conclusions: The prevalence of PSCI is high after minor ischemic stroke. In particular, attention and working memory and executive function are most commonly impaired. Although the risk factors for PSCI are numerous, shorter total sleep time and degree of hypoxia at night warrant further attention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-018-1709-4DOI Listing
June 2019

Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Parkinson's Disease: Clinical Implications and Management.

Chin Med J (Engl) 2018 Apr;131(8):974-981

Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215004; Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Neuropsychiatric Diseases and Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123, China.

Objective: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the most common sleep abnormalities in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), yet its multifactorial etiology complicates its treatment. This review summarized recent studies on the epidemiology, etiology, clinical implications, associated features, and evaluation of EDS in PD. The efficacy of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments for EDS in PD was also reviewed.

Data Sources: English language articles indexed in PubMed and Cochrane databases and Chinese-language papers indexed in Wanfang and National Knowledge Infrastructure databases that were published between January 1987 and November 2017 were located using the following search terms: "sleepiness", "sleep and Parkinson's disease", and "Parkinson's disease and treatment".

Study Selection: Original research articles and critical reviews related to EDS in PD were selected.

Results: EDS is a major health hazard and is associated with many motor and nonmotor symptoms of PD. Its causes are multifactorial. There are few specific guidelines for the treatment of EDS in PD. It is first necessary to identify and treat any possible factors causing EDS. Recent studies showed that some nonpharmacologic (i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy, light therapy, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation) and pharmacologic (i.e., modafinil, methylphenidate, caffeine, istradefylline, sodium oxybate, and atomoxetine) treatments may be effective in treating EDS in PD.

Conclusions: EDS is common in the PD population and can have an immensely negative impact on quality of life. Its causes are multifactorial, which complicates its treatment. Further investigations are required to determine the safety and efficacy of potential therapies and to develop novel treatment approaches for EDS in PD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0366-6999.229889DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5912065PMC
April 2018

Effect of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder on Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Cognition of Parkinson's Disease Patients.

Chin Med J (Engl) 2018 Apr;131(8):899-906

Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215004, China.

Background: Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are the most common sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to identify whether RBD could alleviate OSA severity in PD patients and its effect on cognitive impairment.

Methods: From February 2014 to May 2017, we recruited 174 PD patients from the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, all of whom underwent polysomnography (PSG). We collected clinical data, PSG results, and compared information between patients with and without RBD or OSA by analysis of covariance. We also investigated the effect of these sleep disorders on cognitive impairment using linear regression.

Results: We grouped participants as follows: PD only (n = 53), PD + OSA (n = 29), PD + RBD (n = 61), and PD + RBD + OSA (n = 31). Minimum oxygen saturation (SaO) during whole sleep and in REM sleep was higher in PD + RBD + OSA patients than that in PD + OSA patients. PD + RBD patients had worse Mini-Mental Status Examination and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores than those in the PD group (P < 0.001), especially in visuospatial/executive, attention, and memory functions. The PD + OSA group performed worse than the PD group in the delayed recall domain. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, education, disease severity, and other sleep disorders, MoCA was negatively associated with OSA (β = -0.736, P = 0.043) and RBD (β = -2.575,P < 0.001). The severity of RBD (tonic/phasic electromyography activity) and OSA (apnea-hypopnea index/oxygen desaturation index/minimum SaO) were also associated with MoCA. The adjusted β values of RBD-related parameters were higher than that for OSA.

Conclusions: We found that RBD alleviated OSA severity; however, RBD and OSA together exacerbated PD cognitive impairment. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether OSA treatment can improve cognition in PD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0366-6999.229888DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5912054PMC
April 2018

Two polysomnographic features of REM sleep behavior disorder: Clinical variations insight for Parkinson's disease.

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2017 Nov 5;44:66-72. Epub 2017 Sep 5.

Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, China; Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China. Electronic address:

Introduction: Loss of REM sleep muscle atonia (RWA) and dream-enactment behavior (DEB) are two associated features of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which is frequently associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Few studies have examined both DEB and RWA simultaneously in patients with PD. This study aimed to evaluate relationships between RWA, DEB and clinical characteristics of PD.

Methods: We conducted overnight polysomnography in 145 patients with PD. DEB (motor behaviors and/or vocalizations during REM) and increased RWA (IRWA; tonic and phasic chin EMG density ≥ 30% and ≥15%, respectively) were identified. Patients were categorized as clinical RBD (DEB and IRWA), sub-DEB positive (DEB only), subclinical RBD (IRWA only), or normal REM sleep.

Results: Patients with DEB had higher Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III score, levodopa equivalent dose(LEDs), and worse cognition. RWA was associated with H&Y stage, LEDs, cognition, and sleep structure in all patients. PD duration was associated with RWA, but not DEB. The PD patients who exhibited clinical or subclinical RBD, compared to sub-DEB positive, had higher H&Y stage, UPDRS III score and LEDs, lower cognitive score, worse sleep structure than the PD + cREM group.

Conclusion: Both DEB and RWA were associated with severity of PD illness. Subclinical RBD might have different disease progression from sub-DEB positive. DEB symptoms may fluctuate or disappear whereas RWA may continue to develop as PD progresses. Differences in the course of DEB and RWA may reflect the difference in the degeneration process of neurodegenerative disorders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2017.09.003DOI Listing
November 2017

Pain Correlates with Sleep Disturbances in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

Pain Pract 2018 01 5;18(1):29-37. Epub 2017 May 5.

Department of Neurology and Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China.

Objectives: Both sleep disorders and pain decrease quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about the relationship between objective sleep disturbances and pain in patients with PD. This study aimed to (1) examine the clinical characteristics of pain in PD patients and (2) explore the correlation between pain and sleep disturbances in PD patients.

Methods: Parkinson's disease patients (N = 144) underwent extensive clinical evaluations of motor and nonmotor symptoms and characteristics of pain. Overnight video-polysomnography was also conducted. Clinical characteristics and sleep parameters were compared between PD patients with or without pain.

Results: Pain was reported by 75 patients (52.1%), with 49 (65.3%) reporting pain of at least moderate severity. PD patients with pain were older and had longer disease duration, more severe PD symptoms as assessed by Hoehn and Yahr stage and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and higher L-dopa equivalent daily dose compared with PD patients without pain. PD patients with pain also showed significantly decreased sleep efficiency (57.06% ± 15.84% vs. 73.80% ± 12.00%, P < 0.001), increased nonrapid eye movement stage 1 (N1) sleep (33.38% ± 19.32% vs. 17.84% ± 8.48%, P < 0.001), and decreased rapid eye movement sleep (12.76% ± 8.24% vs. 16.06% ± 6.53%, P = 0.009). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed that poorer activities of daily living, depressed mood, higher percentage of N1 sleep, and lower sleep efficiency were independent predictors of pain in patients with PD.

Conclusions: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common type of pain in patients with PD. Disrupted sleep continuity, altered sleep architecture, depressed mood, and compromised activities of daily living may be associated with pain in patients with PD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/papr.12578DOI Listing
January 2018

Tonic Electromyogram Density in Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Parkinsonism and Parkinson's Disease.

Chin Med J (Engl) 2017 Mar;130(6):684-690

Department of Neurology and Sleep Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215004; Suzhou Clinical Research Center of Neurological Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215004; Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123, China.

Background: Both Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) have associated sleep disorders related to the underlying neurodegenerative pathology. Clinically, MSA with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-P) resembles PD in the manifestation of prominent parkinsonism. Whether the amount of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia could be a potential marker for differentiating MSA-P from PD has not been thoroughly investigated. This study aimed to examine whether sleep parameters could provide a method for differentiating MSA-P from PD.

Methods: This study comprised 24 MSA-P patients and 30 PD patients, and they were of similar age, gender, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) prevalence. All patients underwent clinical evaluation and one night of video-polysomnography recording. The tonic and phasic chin electromyogram (EMG) activity was manually quantified during REM sleep of each patient. We divided both groups in terms of whether they had RBD to make subgroup analysis.

Results: No significant difference between MSA-P group and PD group had been found in clinical characteristics and sleep architecture. However, MSA-P patients had higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI; 1.15 [0.00, 8.73]/h vs. 0.00 [0.00, 0.55]/h, P = 0.024) and higher tonic chin EMG density (34.02 [18.48, 57.18]% vs. 8.40 [3.11, 13.06]%, P < 0.001) as compared to PD patients. Subgroup analysis found that tonic EMG density in MSA + RBD subgroup was higher than that in PD + RBD subgroup (55.04 [26.81, 69.62]% vs. 11.40 [8.51, 20.41]%, P < 0.001). Furthermore, no evidence of any difference in tonic EMG density emerged between PD + RBD and MSA - RBD subgroups (P > 0.05). Both disease duration (P = 0.056) and AHI (P = 0.051) showed no significant differences during subgroup analysis although there was a trend toward longer disease duration in PD + RBD subgroup and higher AHI in MSA - RBD subgroup. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis identified the presence of MSA-P (β = 0.552, P < 0.001) and RBD (β = 0.433, P < 0.001) as predictors of higher tonic EMG density.

Conclusion: Tonic chin EMG density could be a potential marker for differentiating MSA-P from PD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0366-6999.201603DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5358418PMC
March 2017

Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning: a window into rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders in Parkinson's disease.

Sleep Breath 2016 Dec 3;20(4):1285-1292. Epub 2016 Jun 3.

Department of Neurology and Sleep Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, 1055 Sanxiang Road, Suzhou, 215004, China.

Purpose: Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Idiopathic RBD (iRBD) is a well-established prodromal hallmark of synucleinopathies and occurs secondary to many neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. The aim of this study is to determine whether or not retinal structures are altered with the onset of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorders (RBD).

Methods: In all, a total of 63 patients with PD, 14 patients with idiopathic RBD, and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were enrolled and underwent optical coherence tomography measurements (HD-OCT (Zeiss) ) for the average and every quadrant of RNFL thickness. The REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ) was used to classify PD patients with clinically probable RBD (PD + pRBD) or without probable RBD (PD - pRBD). Patients with iRBD were identified by polysomnography.

Results: For patients with RBD (idiopathic or secondary to PD), we found a significant decrease in RNFL thickness compared with groups without RBD (PD - pRBD and healthy controls) (all p < 0.05). Average RNFL thickness in patients with iRBD is significantly thinner than in healthy controls (p < 0.05). In PD, the average RNFL thickness was dramatically thinner in the PD + pRBD group than the PD - pRBD group (p < 0.005). Compared with healthy controls, RNFL thickness was slightly thinner in the drug-naive PD group but not the PD group with drug treatment. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that RBDSQ score was negatively associated with average and inferior RNFL variation in PD (all p < 0.005).

Conclusions: The findings show that RNFL was slightly but significantly thinner in idiopathic RBD. In PD, RNFL thickness may vary depending on the presence of RBD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-016-1366-4DOI Listing
December 2016

Elevated Serum Liver Enzymes in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-hypopnea Syndrome.

Chin Med J (Engl) 2015 Nov;128(22):2983-7

Department of Neurology and Sleep Center, Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215004; Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123; Beijing Key Laboratory for Parkinson's Disease, Beijing 100053, China.

Background: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with elevated liver enzymes and fatty liver. The purpose of this study was to measure serum liver enzyme levels in patients evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and the factors associated with liver injury in OSAS patients.

Methods: All patients referred to PSG for evaluation of sleep apnea symptoms between June 2011 and November 2014 were included in this study. Demographic data and PSG parameters were recorded. Serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels were systematically measured. OSAS patients were divided into mild, moderate, and severe groups according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) values of 5-14 events/h, 15-29 events/h, and ≥30 events/h.

Results: A total of 540 patients were enrolled in this study; among these patients, 386 were male. Elevated liver enzymes were present in 42.3% of OSAS patients (32.4% in mild/moderate group; 51.0% in severe group) and 28.1% patients without OSAS. Patients with OSAS had higher body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.01). In the bivariate correlation, the liver enzymes level was negatively correlated with age and the lowest arterial oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ), and was positively correlated with BMI, oxygen desaturation index, percent of total time with oxygen saturation level <90% (TS90%), AHI, total cholesterol (TC), and triglyceride (TG). In logistic regression analysis, Age, BMI, TS90%, TC, and TG were included in the regression equation.

Conclusions: Our data suggest that OSAS is a risk factor for elevated liver enzymes. The severity of OSAS is correlated with liver enzyme levels; we hypothesize that hypoxia is one of main causes of liver damage in patients with OSAS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0366-6999.168943DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4795259PMC
November 2015

Clinical correlates of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in Parkinson's disease.

Clin Neurophysiol 2015 Jun 28;126(6):1198-1203. Epub 2014 Sep 28.

Department of Neurology, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Translational Research and Therapy for Neuro-Psycho-Diseases and The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, China; Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China. Electronic address:

Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia (RWA) and Parkinson's disease (PD) progression.

Methods: We quantified tonic and phasic RWA by performing polysomnography in 198 PD patients. We then correlated the extent of RWA with clinical patient characteristics.

Results: PD patients were categorized into quartiles of tonic and phasic RWA. We found that patients with more RWA tended to be older and have longer PD duration, a greater likelihood of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), more advanced Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) stage, a higher dose of parkinsonian medication, poorer cognitive performance, worse quality of life, and more severe sleep disturbance. After adjusting for age, sex, and PD duration, patients in the highest two RWA quartile were more likely to have severe PD (H&Y stage ⩾ 3.0) than those in the lowest RWA quartile.

Conclusions: These findings provide evidence that RWA, especially with regard to tonic muscle activity, is associated with PD severity.

Significance: Further studies are warranted to determine the importance and utility of assessing RWA to evaluate sleep in PD patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2014.09.014DOI Listing
June 2015

AGEs-RAGE system down-regulates Sirt1 through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote FN and TGF-β1 expression in male rat glomerular mesangial cells.

Endocrinology 2015 Jan;156(1):268-79

Laboratory of Pharmacology and Toxicology (K.-P.H., C.C., J.H., J.-Y.H., P.-Q.L., H.-Q.H.), School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006, China; and Department of Pharmacy (K.-P.H.), The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.

We previously demonstrated that advanced glycation-end products (AGEs) promote the pathological progression of diabetic nephropathy by decreasing silent information regulator 2-related protein 1 (Sirt1) expression in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Here, we investigated whether AGEs-receptor for AGEs (RAGE) system down-regulated Sirt1 expression through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and whether Sirt1 ubiquitination affected fibronectin (FN) and TGF-β1, 2 fibrotic indicators in GMCs. Sirt1 was polyubiquitinated and subsequently degraded by proteasome. AGEs increased Sirt1 ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, shortened Sirt1 half-life, and promoted FN and TGF-β1 expression. Ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22) reduced Sirt1 ubiquitination and degradation and decreased FN and TGF-β1 expression in GMCs under both basal and AGEs-treated conditions. USP22 depletion enhanced Sirt1 degradation and displayed combined effects with AGEs to further promote FN and TGF-β1 expression. RAGE functioned crucial mediating roles in these processes via its C-terminal cytosolic domain. Inhibiting Sirt1 by EX-527 substantially suppressed the down-regulation of FN and TGF-β1 resulting from USP22 overexpression under both normal and AGEs-treated conditions, eventually leading to their up-regulation in GMCs. These results indicated that the AGEs-RAGE system increased the ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation of Sirt1 by reducing USP22 level, and AGEs-RAGE-USP22-Sirt1 formed a cascade pathway that regulated FN and TGF-β1 level, which participated in the pathological progression of diabetic nephropathy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2014-1381DOI Listing
January 2015

Validation study of REM sleep behavior disorder questionnaire-Hong Kong (RBDQ-HK) in east China.

Sleep Med 2014 Aug 14;15(8):952-8. Epub 2014 May 14.

Department of Neurology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China; Sleep Center, Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China; Institutes of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, China. Electronic address:

Objective: To validate the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) Questionnaire-Hong Kong (RBDQ-HK) in polysomnography (PSG)-confirmed RBD and non-RBD subjects, and to evaluate its usefulness in different clinical populations.

Methods: In total, 325 subjects (115 RBD and 210 controls) from East China were enrolled. After patients had finished the structured interview, and completed the RBDQ-HK and video-PSG test, we evaluated the reliability of RBDQ-HK (areas under the curves (AUC), the best cut-off values, factor 2 of RBDQ-HK, and overall scale) and validated the usefulness of RBDQ-HK between the Parkinson disease (PD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) groups.

Results: The best cut-off values for factor 2 of RBDQ-HK were located at 7/8 with a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 82% (AUC=0.911), and for RBDQ-HK overall scale were located at 17 with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 81% (AUC=0.892) in all subjects. Both factor 2 and overall scale of RBDQ-HK are valid in all subjects (PD and OSA patients), with a higher accuracy given by factor 2 of RBDQ-HK.

Conclusions: RBDQ-HK and its factor 2 are useful and validated RBD screening instruments, and could be used as a tool for screening RBD in patients with PD and OSA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2014.03.020DOI Listing
August 2014

Management of groundwater in farmed pond area using risk-based regulation.

Environ Monit Assess 2014 Sep 29;186(9):5763-75. Epub 2014 May 29.

Department of Resources Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Blackfoot disease (BFD) had occurred seriously in the Yichu, Hsuehchia, Putai, and Peimen townships of Chia-Nan District of Taiwan in the early days. These four townships are the districts of fishpond cultivation domestically in Taiwan. Groundwater becomes the main water supply because of short income in surface water. The problems of over pumping in groundwater may not only result in land subsidence and seawater intrusion but also be harmful to the health of human giving rise to the bioaccumulation via food chain in groundwater with arsenic (As). This research uses sequential indicator simulation (SIS) to characterize the spatial arsenic distribution in groundwater in the four townships. Risk assessment is applied to explore the dilution ratio (DR) of groundwater utilization, which is defined as the ratio showing the volume of groundwater utilization compared to pond water, for fish farming in the range of target cancer risk (TR) especially on the magnitude of 10(-4)~10(-6). Our study results reveal that the 50th percentile of groundwater DRs served as a regulation standard can be used to perform fish farm groundwater management for a TR of 10(-6). For a TR of 5 × 10(-6), we suggest using the 75th percentile of DR for groundwater management. For a TR of 10(-5), we suggest using the 95th percentile of the DR standard for performing groundwater management in fish farm areas. For the TR of exceeding 5 × 10(-5), we do not suggest establishing groundwater management standards under these risk standards. Based on the research results, we suggest that establishing a TR at 10(-5) and using the 95th percentile of DR are best for groundwater management in fish farm areas.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-014-3818-2DOI Listing
September 2014

Clinical manifestations of Parkinson disease and the onset of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

Sleep Med 2014 Jun 6;15(6):647-53. Epub 2014 Mar 6.

Department of Neurology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China; Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, China. Electronic address:

Objective: To identify whether the presence and/or timing of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) onset were associated with differences in clinical features and sleep parameters of Parkinson disease (PD).

Methods: In all, 112 PD patients were enrolled and all underwent extensive clinical evaluations and video-polysomnography (PSG). Clinical features and PSG parameters were compared in PD patients with (PD+RBD) or without (PD-RBD) RBD, RBD preceding (RBD>PD), or not (PD⩾RBD) PD onset.

Results: Sixty-three of the 112 PD patients were affected by RBD. Adjusted for age, gender, education, body mass index (BMI), levodopa equivalent daily dose (LED) and PD duration, PD+RBD patients had higher Hoehn & Yahr stage, higher scores for UPDRS parts I, II and III, more dyskinesia, higher ratio of axial/limb manifestations, and more hallucinations. Their cognitive and quality-of-life status was significantly lower (all P<0.05). For PSG, PD+RBD patients exhibited higher percentages of phasic and tonic EMG activities, lower apnea hypopnea (AHI) and oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and less time in arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) <90% during REM sleep (all P<0.05). PD⩾RBD (n=22) patients did not significantly differ from RBD>PD (n=41) patients in clinical manifestations, whereas the PD⩾RBD subgroup had significantly higher UPDRS part I score, lower PDQ score and lower AHI during REM than the PD-RBD group (all P<0.05), but not RBD>PD subgroup. Correlation analysis showed that worse cognition was associated with shorter interval of RBD preceding PD onset (r=0.297, P=0.018), but not RBD duration (P=0.202).

Conclusions: Clinical manifestations of PD may vary depending on the presence and timing of RBD onset. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that RBD may be a marker of complex subtypes of PD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2013.12.021DOI Listing
June 2014

The effect on patient loyalty of service quality, patient visit experience and perceived switching costs: lessons from one Taiwan university hospital.

Health Serv Manage Res 2011 Feb;24(1):29-36

Department of Medical Information Management, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan.

The reimbursement system changed from fee-for-service to fixed prospective payments in Taiwan, the effect on the physician-patient's relationship is worth being studied. We examined the relationship between patient visit experience, cost perceptions and the two important aspects of quality of care, curing and interpersonal performance, and patients' loyalty to the hospital physicians. A total of 404 patients from an acute care hospital in Taiwan, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital (KMUH), were investigated using a self-administered mailing survey. All measures including patient loyalty (PL), curing service quality (CSQ), interpersonal service quality (ISQ), visit experience (VE) and perceived switching costs (PSC), were adapted and modified from existing scales. Our results showed that the physician's CSQ and ISQ positively affected patients' loyalty to KMUH. The interaction between the main effects of service quality, patients' VE and three types of switching visit costs, yielded additional insights into the importance of service quality for patient retention. The CSQ of physicians becomes a more important determinant of loyalty than ISQ as patients' VE increases. The importance of CSQ and ISQ increases in relation to PL as the perceived procedural and relational costs of changing care providers increases. Neither CSQ nor ISQ has a reduced relationship with PL as the perceived financial costs of switching hospitals increase. Our study indicates that the impact of CSQ and ISQ on loyalty varies according to the perceived visit costs of changing hospitals and the patients' VE.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1258/hsmr.2010.010011DOI Listing
February 2011

Internet blogs as a tourism marketing medium: A case study.

J Bus Res 2006 Oct 27;59(10):1201-1205. Epub 2006 Sep 27.

Graduate School of Management, I-Shou University, 1, Section 1, Hsueh-Cheng Rd., Ta-Hsu Hsiang, Kaohsiung County, 840, Taiwan.

This study explores a 2003 Yahoo Anniversary Website-I left my heart in Aegean Sea-built by Justin, a Taiwanese engineer. Justin returns from the romantic Aegean Sea and puts 124 photographs he took onto a website to share with his friends. Unexpectedly, the website becomes a hit and the address achieves wide distribution via various chain e-mails. The site helps to promote tourism to Greece, a destination relatively unknown to most Taiwanese. This investigation explores why the site appeals to so many visitors, impresses them, and even draws them to plan travel to Greece. The article describes the effect of the website by analyzing messages left on the site. The AIDA model is useful for classifying holistic messages. The data demonstrate that the website generates desire and action in over 45% of its readers. These individuals either announce plans to visit Greece immediately or at some time in the foreseeable future. The website thus significantly influences browsers and indirectly promotes Greek tourism. Then, this article describes the key success factors of this popular website. Finally, the article presents suggestions and implications for the tourism industry and for nations seeking to promote tourism.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2005.11.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7112696PMC
October 2006