Publications by authors named "Jun Yonekawa"

6 Publications

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Cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation without the use of a contrast medium: a combination of the intracardiac echocardiography and pressure wave monitoring guided approach.

Heart Vessels 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.

In cryoballoon ablation (CBA), a contrast medium is commonly used to confirm balloon occlusion of the pulmonary veins (PVs). However, a contrast medium cannot always be used in patients with renal dysfunction and allergy. The present study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of CBA without the use of a contrast medium. We retrospectively examined consecutive patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) who underwent first-time CBA. We compared the procedural results and outcomes in patients for whom a contrast medium was used (contrast group) and those from whom a contrast medium was not used (non-contrast group). In the non-contrast group, we used saline injection on the intracardiac echocardiography and pressure wave monitoring for PV occlusion. Fifty patients (200 PVs) and 22 patients (88 PVs) underwent CBA with and without a contrast medium, respectively. The success rate of PV isolation with CBA alone was 93% and 90% in the non-contrast and contrast groups, respectively (p = 0.40). The fluoroscopy time and nadir temperature were significantly lower in the non-contrast group as compared to that in the contrast group. The recurrence rate 1 year after ablation did not differ between the two groups (18% vs. 18%, p > 0.99). Furthermore, the number of reconnected PVs in patients with recurrence was significantly lower in the non-contrast group than in the contrast group (6% vs. 36%, p = 0.017). In conclusion, CBA using the intracardiac echocardiography and pressure monitoring approach without the use of a contrast medium was safe and efficient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00380-021-01963-3DOI Listing
October 2021

Earliest pulmonary vein potential-guided cryoballoon ablation is associated with better clinical outcomes than conventional cryoballoon ablation: A result from two randomized clinical studies.

J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2021 Sep 17. Epub 2021 Sep 17.

Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.

Introduction: With regard to short-term outcome in atrial fibrillation (AF), the benefit of cryoballoon ablation (CBA) by pressing a balloon against the earliest pulmonary vein (PV) potential site during PV isolation (earliest potential [EP]-guided CBA) has been previously demonstrated. The present study aimed to evaluate the long-term outcome of the EP-guided CBA.

Methods And Results: This study included 136 patients from two randomized studies, who underwent CBA for paroxysmal AF for the first time. Patients were randomly assigned to the EP-guided and conventional CBA groups in each study. In the EP-guided CBA group, we pressed a balloon against the EP site when the time-to-isolation (TTI) after cryoapplication exceeded 60 and 45 s in the first and second studies, respectively. We compared the clinical outcomes for 1 year after the procedure between the EP-guided CBA group (68 patients) and the conventional CBA group (68 patients). The primary endpoint was the recurrence of atrial arrhythmia after ablation. No significant differences in baseline characteristics were observed between the two groups. Compared with the conventional CBA group, the EP-guided CBA group had a significantly higher success rate at TTI ≤ 90 s (98.5% vs. 90.0%, p < .001); lower touch-up rate and total cryoapplication; and shorter procedure time, and fluoroscopy time. The recurrence at 1 year after ablation was significantly lower in the EP-guided CBA group than in the conventional CBA group (6.0% vs. 19.4%; p = .019).

Conclusions: The EP-guided CBA approach can facilitate the ablation procedure and achieve low recurrence at 1 year after ablation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jce.15246DOI Listing
September 2021

Impact of the clinical frailty scale on clinical outcomes and bleeding events in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

Heart Vessels 2021 Jun 7;36(6):799-808. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is a simple tool to assess patients' frailty and may help to predict adverse outcomes in elderly patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of CFS on clinical outcomes and bleeding events after successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We enrolled 266 consecutive patients with STEMI who underwent primary PCI in between January 2015 and June 2018. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the CFS stages: CFS 1-3 and CFS ≥ 4. We collected the data and evaluated the relationship between the CFS grade and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and Bleeding Academic Research Consortium 3 or 5 bleeding events. Of these patients, CFS ≥ 4 was present in 59 (22.2%). During the follow-up, 37.3% in the CFS ≥ 4 group and 8.2% in the CFS 1-3 group experienced MACE. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, the proportion of MACE-free survival for 4 years was significantly lower in the CFS ≥ 4 group (log-rank P < 0.001). Additionally, the proportion of bleeding event-free survival was significantly lower in the CFS ≥ 4 group (log-rank P < 0.001). The CFS (per 1-grade increase) remained an independent significant predictor of MACE on multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis [hazard ratio 1.39 (95% confidence interval: 1.08 to 1.79, P = 0.01)]. In conclusion, CFS was an independent predictor of future adverse cardiac events in patients with STEMI. Therefore, the assessment of CFS is crucial in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00380-020-01764-0DOI Listing
June 2021

Neurogenic pulmonary edema secondary to epileptic seizure.

Clin Case Rep 2020 Dec 4;8(12):3559-3560. Epub 2020 Aug 4.

Department of Respiratory Medicine Yokkaichi Municipal Hospital Yokkaichi-shi Japan.

Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema that is caused by an acute central nervous system injury and usually develops rapidly after an injury. Although several episodes of NPE resolve spontaneously, the condition may cause unexpected death among patients with epilepsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.3196DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7752324PMC
December 2020

Impact of skeletal muscle mass on clinical outcomes in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Cardiovasc Interv Ther 2021 Oct 31;36(4):514-522. Epub 2020 Oct 31.

Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

Low skeletal muscle mass is one of the components of sarcopenia. However, the prognostic impact of skeletal muscle mass on clinical outcomes in patients after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) remains unclear. Therefore, we assessed the impact of skeletal muscle mass on future cardiovascular events in patients undergoing TAVR. We enrolled 71 consecutive patients who underwent TAVR for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. We applied bilateral psoas muscles as an indicator of skeletal muscle mass. Psoas muscle volumes were measured from the origin of psoas at the level of the lumbar vertebrae to its insertion in the lesser trochanter on three-dimensional computed tomography datasets. Psoas muscle mass index (PMI) was calculated as psoas muscle volume/height (cm/m). According to the median value of PMIs (79.8 and 60.0 cm/m for men and women), the enrolled patients were divided into two groups. During the follow-up, 11 (31.4%) patients in low PMI group and 4 (11.1%) in high PMI group experienced major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) defined as a composite of death from any cause, myocardial infarction, heart failure hospitalization, and stroke. The proportion of MACE-free survival was significantly lower in low PMI group (log-rank P = 0.033), mainly due to the difference of hospital readmission for congestive heart failure. On multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis, PMI remained an independent negative predictor of MACE [hazard ratio 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.92-0.98, P = 0.002)]. In conclusion, low skeletal muscle mass independently predicted MACE in patients undergoing TAVR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12928-020-00725-8DOI Listing
October 2021

Hyperforin/HP--Cyclodextrin Enhances Mechanosensitive Ca Signaling in HaCaT Keratinocytes and in Atopic Skin Ex Vivo Which Accelerates Wound Healing.

Biomed Res Int 2017 22;2017:8701801. Epub 2017 Jan 22.

Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Nagoya 466-8550, Japan.

Cutaneous wound healing is accelerated by mechanical stretching, and treatment with hyperforin, a major component of a traditional herbal medicine and a known TRPC6 activator, further enhances the acceleration. We recently revealed that this was due to the enhancement of ATP-Ca signaling in keratinocytes by hyperforin treatment. However, the low aqueous solubility and easy photodegradation impede the topical application of hyperforin for therapeutic purposes. We designed a compound hydroxypropyl--cyclodextrin- (HP--CD-) tetracapped hyperforin, which had increased aqueous solubility and improved photoprotection. We assessed the physiological effects of hyperforin/HP--CD on wound healing in HaCaT keratinocytes using live imaging to observe the ATP release and the intracellular Ca increase. In response to stretching (20%), ATP was released only from the foremost cells at the wound edge; it then diffused to the cells behind the wound edge and activated the P2Y receptors, which caused propagating Ca waves via TRPC6. This process might facilitate wound closure, because the Ca response and wound healing were inhibited in parallel by various inhibitors of ATP-Ca signaling. We also applied hyperforin/HP--CD on an ex vivo skin model of atopic dermatitis and found that hyperforin/HP--CD treatment for 24 h improved the stretch-induced Ca responses and oscillations which failed in atopic skin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/8701801DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5292202PMC
February 2017
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