Publications by authors named "Juliette Roussel"

7 Publications

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Severe preschool asthmatics have altered cytokine and anti-viral responses during exacerbation.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2020 08 17;31(6):651-661. Epub 2020 May 17.

Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy Department, Hôpital Jeanne de Flandre, CHU Lille, Univ. Lille, Lille cedex, France.

Background: Preschool asthma/recurrent wheeze is a heterogeneous condition. Different clinical phenotypes have been described, including episodic viral wheeze (EVW), severe intermittent wheeze (SIW), and multiple-trigger wheeze (MTW).

Objective: To compare clinical, viral, and inflammatory/immune profiling at exacerbation between MTW, SIW, and EVW phenotypes.

Methods: Multicenter, prospective, observational cohort (VIRASTHMA-2). Children (1-5 years) with preschool asthma were enrolled during hospitalization for a severe exacerbation. History and anamnestic data, plasma, and nasal samples were collected at exacerbation (T1) and at steady state, 8 weeks later (T2), and sputum samples were collected at T1.

Results: A total of 147 children were enrolled, 37 (25%) had SIW, 18 (12.2%) EVW, and 92 (63%) MTW. They were atopic (47%), exposed to mold (22%) and cigarette smoke (50%), and prone to exacerbations (≥2 in the previous year in 70%). At exacerbation, at least one virus was isolated in 94% and rhinovirus in 75%, with no difference between phenotypes. Children with MTW and SIW phenotypes displayed lower plasma concentrations of IFN-γ (P = .002), IL-5 (P = .020), TNF-α (P = .038), IL-10 (P = .002), IFN-β (P = .036), and CXCL10 (P = .006) and lower levels of IFN-γ (P = .047) in sputum at exacerbation than children with EVW. At T2, they also displayed lower plasma levels of IFN-γ (P = .045) and CXCL10 (P = .013).

Conclusion: Among preschool asthmatic children, MTW and SIW, prone to exacerbations, display lower systemic levels of Th1, Th2 cytokines, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral responses during severe virus-induced exacerbation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pai.13268DOI Listing
August 2020

Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus, treated with immunotherapy: a case report.

Immunotherapy 2018 08;10(10):831-835

Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Leon Berard, Claude Bernard University, Lyon, France.

Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus is rare, accounting for less than 0.1-0.2% of all esophageal malignancies. It is associated with a poor outcome due to late detection and high metastatic potential. Here, we report a case of esophageal cancer, which was initially diagnosed as an adenocarcinoma and finally was confirmed as a primary malignant melanoma. This 75-year-old Caucasian male had a history of dysphagia and recent lingering abdominal pain. First biopsy showed a poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma. He was then treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. Biopsies were repeated because of an incomplete tumor response, evaluated by endoscopic and imaging studies. The final diagnosis was a malignant melanoma. The patient has been treated with immune-checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab, an anti-PD1 antibody.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0011DOI Listing
August 2018

Minimizing immunosuppression as a trigger for a fatal antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation.

Transpl Int 2015 Jul 10;28(7):876-7. Epub 2015 Apr 10.

Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tri.12557DOI Listing
July 2015

Characterization of the expression of the hepatitis C virus F protein.

J Gen Virol 2003 Jul;84(Pt 7):1751-1759

CNRS-UPR 2511, IBL/Institut Pasteur de Lille, 59021 Lille Cedex, France.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen that affects 170 million people worldwide. The HCV genome is approximately 9.6 kb in length and encodes a polyprotein that is proteolytically cleaved to generate at least 10 mature viral protein products. Recently, a new protein, named F, has been described to be expressed through a ribosomal frameshift within the capsid-encoding sequence, a mechanism unique among members of the family Flavidiridae: Here, expression of the F protein was investigated in an in vitro transcription/translation assay. Its expression in mammalian cells was confirmed using specific recombinant vaccinia viruses; under these conditions, protein expression is dependent on the HCV IRES. The F protein was tagged with firefly luciferase or the Myc epitope to facilitate its identification. Ribosomal frameshifting was dependent on the presence of mutations in the capsid-encoding sequence. No frameshifting was detected in the absence of any mutation. Furthermore, analysis of the F protein in time-course experiments revealed that the protein is very unstable and that its production can be stabilized by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Finally, indirect immunofluorescence studies have localized the F protein in the cytoplasm, with notable perinuclear detection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/vir.0.19065-0DOI Listing
July 2003

Topological changes in the transmembrane domains of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoproteins.

EMBO J 2002 Jun;21(12):2893-902

CNRS-UPR2511, Institut de Biologie de Lille and Institut Pasteur de Lille, 1 rue Calmette, BP447, 59021 Lille Cedex, France.

Hepatitis C virus proteins are synthesized as a polyprotein cleaved by a signal peptidase and viral proteases. The behaviour of internal signal sequences at the C-terminus of the transmembrane domains of hepatitis C virus envelope proteins E1 and E2 is essential for the topology of downstream polypeptides. We determined the topology of these transmembrane domains before and after signal sequence cleavage by tagging E1 and E2 with epitopes and by analysing their accessibility in selectively permeabilized cells. We showed that, after cleavage by signal peptidase in the endoplasmic reticulum, the C-terminal orientation of these transmembrane domains changed from luminal to cytosolic. The dynamic behaviour of these transmembrane domains is unique and it is linked to their multifunctionality. By reorienting their C-terminus toward the cytosol and being part of a transmembrane domain, the signal sequences at the C-terminus of E1 and E2 contribute to new functions: (i) membrane anchoring; (ii) E1E2 heterodimerization; and (iii) endoplasmic reticulum retention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/emboj/cdf295DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC125386PMC
June 2002

Variability of the nonstructural 5A protein of hepatitis C virus type 3a isolates and relation to interferon sensitivity.

J Infect Dis 2002 Mar 14;185(5):573-83. Epub 2002 Feb 14.

Laboratoire de Virologie, Centre Hospitalo Universitaire, 80054 Amiens Cedex, France.

The nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 is thought to interact with several cellular proteins, including the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) induced by interferon (IFN). The PKR-binding domain (PKR-BD; aa 2209-2274), including the IFN sensitivity-determining region (aa 2209-2248) and other regions, could be linked to IFN resistance. Thus, the entire NS5A sequence of 27 isolates of HCV genotype 3a was investigated in relation to the clinical response to IFN. The NS5A 3a protein presented a low variability with some specific variable regions. Differential analysis between IFN-resistant and -sensitive isolates identified 5 regions in NS5A, 2 of them inside the PKR-BD and another around the variable 3 region. However, using the yeast growth suppression assay, no interaction was found between 5 resistant NS5A 3a proteins and PKR. Some amino acid changes of the NS5A protein of genotype 3a seemed to relate to IFN resistance independently of the PKR pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/339051DOI Listing
March 2002