Publications by authors named "Juliette R K Wipf"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Outbreaks of Typhlocolitis Caused by Hypervirulent Group ST1 in Highly Immunocompromised Strains of Mice.

Comp Med 2020 06 13;70(3):277-290. Epub 2020 May 13.

Tri-Institutional Training Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medicine, and The Rockefeller University, New York, New York; Center for Comparative Medicine and Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York;, Email:

is an enteric pathogen that can cause significant clinical disease in both humans and animals. However, clinical disease arises most commonly after treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. The organism's ability to cause naturally occurring disease in mice is rare, and little is known about its clinical significance in highly immunocompromised mice. We report on 2 outbreaks of diarrhea associated with in mice. In outbreak 1, 182 of approximately 2, 400 NOD.Cg-/SzJ (NSG) and related strains of mice became clinically ill after cessation of a 14-d course of 0.12% amoxicillin feed to control an increase in clinical signs associated with infection. Most mice had been engrafted with human tumors; the remainder were experimentally naïve. Affected animals exhibited 1 of 3 clinical syndromes: 1) peracute death; 2) severe diarrhea leading to euthanasia or death; or 3) mild to moderate diarrhea followed by recovery. A given cage could contain both affected and unaffected mice. Outbreak 2 involved a small breeding colony (approximately 50 mice) of NOD. CB17-/NCrCrl (NOD-) mice that had not received antibiotics or experimental manipulations. In both outbreaks, was isolated, and toxins A and B were detected in intestinal content or feces. Histopathologic lesions highly suggestive of enterotoxemia included fibrinonecrotizing and neutrophilic typhlocolitis with characteristic 'volcano' erosions or pseudomembrane formation. Genomic analysis of 4 isolates (3 from outbreak 1 and 1 from outbreak 2) revealed that these isolates were closely related to a pathogenic human isolate, CD 196. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe naturally occurring outbreaks of -associated typhlocolitis with significant morbidity and mortality in highly immunocompromised strains of mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-CM-19-000109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7287380PMC
June 2020

Genome Sequences of Six Prophages Isolated from Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Strains Recovered from Human and Animal Clinical Specimens.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2019 Jul 11;8(28). Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Laboratory of Bacterial Pathogenesis and Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA

is a common bacterial pathogen in companion animal medicine and has demonstrated zoonotic potential. Here, we report six new prophage genomes of the family, identified in isolates recovered from human and canine clinical specimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00387-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6624759PMC
July 2019

New Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B Resistance Gene (48) on the Novel Plasmid pJW2311 in Staphylococcus xylosus.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2017 07 27;61(7). Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

Whole-genome sequencing of strain JW2311 from bovine mastitis milk identified the novel 49.3-kb macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS) resistance plasmid pJW2311. It contained the macrolide resistance gene (C), the macrolide-streptogramin B resistance gene (A), and the new MLS resistance gene (48) and could be transformed into by electroporation. Functionality of (48) was demonstrated by cloning and expression in .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00066-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5487640PMC
July 2017

The new macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene erm(45) is located within a genomic island in Staphylococcus fleurettii.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2015 16;59(6):3578-81. Epub 2015 Mar 16.

Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

Genome alignment of a macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB)-resistant Staphylococcus fleurettii strain with an MLSB-susceptible S. fleurettii strain revealed a novel 11,513-bp genomic island carrying the new erythromycin resistance methylase gene erm(45). This gene was shown to confer inducible MLSB resistance when cloned into Staphylococcus aureus. The erm(45)-containing island was integrated into the housekeeping gene guaA in S. fleurettii and was able to form a circular intermediate but was not transmissible to S. aureus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00369-15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4432203PMC
March 2016

The novel macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B resistance gene erm(44) is associated with a prophage in Staphylococcus xylosus.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2014 Oct 4;58(10):6133-8. Epub 2014 Aug 4.

Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

A novel erythromycin ribosome methylase gene, erm(44), that confers resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics was identified by whole-genome sequencing of the chromosome of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from bovine mastitis milk. The erm(44) gene is preceded by a regulatory sequence that encodes two leader peptides responsible for the inducible expression of the methylase gene, as demonstrated by cloning in Staphylococcus aureus. The erm(44) gene is located on a 53-kb putative prophage designated ΦJW4341-pro. The 56 predicted open reading frames of ΦJW4341-pro are structurally organized into the five functional modules found in members of the family Siphoviridae. ΦJW4341-pro is site-specifically integrated into the S. xylosus chromosome, where it is flanked by two perfect 19-bp direct repeats, and exhibits the ability to circularize. The presence of erm(44) in three additional S. xylosus strains suggests that this putative prophage has the potential to disseminate MLSB resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02949-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4187952PMC
October 2014

Evaluation of PCR electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry for rapid molecular diagnosis of bovine mastitis.

J Dairy Sci 2013 Jun 12;96(6):3611-20. Epub 2013 Apr 12.

Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Bovine mastitis, an inflammatory disease of the mammary gland, is one of the most costly diseases affecting the dairy industry. The treatment and prevention of this disease is linked heavily to the use of antibiotics in agriculture and early detection of the primary pathogen is essential to control the disease. Milk samples (n=67) from cows suffering from mastitis were analyzed for the presence of pathogens using PCR electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) and were compared with standard culture diagnostic methods. Concurrent identification of the primary mastitis pathogens was obtained for 64% of the tested milk samples, whereas divergent results were obtained for 27% of the samples. The PCR/ESI-MS failed to identify some of the primary pathogens in 18% of the samples, but identified other pathogens as well as microorganisms in samples that were negative by culture. The PCR/ESI-MS identified bacteria to the species level as well as yeasts and molds in samples that contained a mixed bacterial culture (9%). The sensitivity of the PCR/ESI-MS for the most common pathogens ranged from 57.1 to 100% and the specificity ranged from 69.8 to 100% using culture as gold standard. The PCR/ESI-MS also revealed the presence of the methicillin-resistant gene mecA in 16.2% of the milk samples, which correlated with the simultaneous detection of staphylococci including Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrated that PCR/ESI-MS, a more rapid diagnostic platform compared with bacterial culture, has the significant potential to serve as an important screening method in the diagnosis of bovine clinical mastitis and has the capacity to be used in infection control programs for both subclinical and clinical disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2012-6124DOI Listing
June 2013