Publications by authors named "Julien Laroche"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Coordinated Interpersonal Behaviour in Collective Dance Improvisation: The Aesthetics of Kinaesthetic Togetherness.

Behav Sci (Basel) 2018 Feb 9;8(2). Epub 2018 Feb 9.

ICI-Project, Labex Arts H2H, Université Paris 8, 93526 Saint-Denis, France.

Collective dance improvisation (e.g., traditional and social dancing, contact improvisation) is a participatory, relational and embodied art form which eschews standard concepts in aesthetics. We present our ongoing research into the mechanisms underlying the lived experience of "togetherness" associated with such practices. Togetherness in collective dance improvisation is kinaesthetic (based on movement and its perception), and so can be simultaneously addressed from the perspective of the performers and the spectators, and be measured. We utilise these multiple levels of description: the first-person, phenomenological level of personal experiences, the third-person description of brain and body activity, and the level of interpersonal dynamics. Here, we describe two of our protocols: a four-person mirror game and a 'rhythm battle' dance improvisation score. Using an interpersonal closeness measure after the practice, we correlate subjective sense of individual/group connectedness and observed levels of in-group temporal synchronization. We propose that kinaesthetic togetherness, or interpersonal resonance, is integral to the aesthetic pleasure of the participants and spectators, and that embodied feeling of togetherness might play a role more generally in aesthetic experience in the performing arts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bs8020023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5836006PMC
February 2018

[Not Available].

Can Urol Assoc J 2015 Jul-Aug;9(7-8):E458-62

Service d'urologie, Hôpital Sainte Anne, Toulon, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.2640DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4514492PMC
August 2015

Your body, my body, our coupling moves our bodies.

Front Hum Neurosci 2014 16;8:1004. Epub 2014 Dec 16.

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University Montreal, QC, Canada ; Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music Montreal, QC, Canada ; International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research Montreal, QC, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.01004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4267207PMC
January 2015

Embodiment of intersubjective time: relational dynamics as attractors in the temporal coordination of interpersonal behaviors and experiences.

Front Psychol 2014 31;5:1180. Epub 2014 Oct 31.

PErSEUs, Université de Lorraine Metz, France.

This paper addresses the issue of "being together," and more specifically the issue of "being together in time." We provide with an integrative framework that is inspired by phenomenology, the enactive approach and dynamical systems theories. To do so, we first define embodiment as a living and lived phenomenon that emerges from agent-world coupling. We then show that embodiment is essentially dynamical and therefore we describe experiential, behavioral and brain dynamics. Both lived temporality and the temporality of the living appear to be complex, multiscale phenomena. Next we discuss embodied dynamics in the context of interpersonal interactions, and briefly review the empirical literature on between-persons temporal coordination. Overall, we propose that being together in time emerges from the relational dynamics of embodied interactions and their flexible co-regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4215825PMC
November 2014

Head to head comparison of nomograms predicting probability of lymph node invasion of prostate cancer in patients undergoing extended pelvic lymph node dissection.

Urology 2012 Mar;79(3):546-51

Department of Urology, Institut Paoli-Calmettes Cancer Centre, Marseille, France.

Objective: To validate the Briganti nomogram and compare it with 2 current lymph node invasion (LNI) nomograms (the Cagiannos nomogram and the updated 2007 Partin tables). The Briganti nomogram predicts the probability of LNI in patients undergoing extended pelvic lymph node dissection (EPLND) during radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer.

Methods: Irrespective of the risk of LNI, 173 consecutive patients were treated for localized prostate cancer with radical laparoscopic prostatectomy and EPLND. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was used to estimate the predictive accuracy of the nomograms, and calibration plots were used for comparisons between the predicted and observed probabilities of LNI.

Results: The median number of nodes removed was 15 (range 10-34). Of the 173 patients, 12 (6.9%) had LNI. The Briganti nomogram achieved a receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.88 versus 0.83 with the Cagiannos nomogram and 0.84 with the 2007 Partin tables. The difference in predictive accuracy was not statistically significant (P < .2). The Briganti nomogram showed only minor departures from the ideal predictions in the low-risk range and the Cagiannos nomogram showed major departures from the ideal predictions for the entire risk range.

Conclusion: The Briganti nomogram provides highly accurate predictions of the risk of LNI after EPLND. Its performance tended to be increased without being significantly better. The other tools also performed reasonably well but underestimate the true risk of LNI. We recommend the use of these tools to identify patients at low risk of LNI for whom EPLND can be safely spared.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2011.11.036DOI Listing
March 2012