Publications by authors named "Julia Barrett"

127 Publications

Immunogenicity of COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines in Pregnant and Lactating Women.

JAMA 2021 06;325(23):2370-2380

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Importance: Pregnant women are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality from COVID-19 but have been excluded from the phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trials. Data on vaccine safety and immunogenicity in these populations are therefore limited.

Objective: To evaluate the immunogenicity of COVID-19 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines in pregnant and lactating women, including against emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern.

Design, Setting, And Participants: An exploratory, descriptive, prospective cohort study enrolled 103 women who received a COVID-19 vaccine from December 2020 through March 2021 and 28 women who had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection from April 2020 through March 2021 (the last follow-up date was March 26, 2021). This study enrolled 30 pregnant, 16 lactating, and 57 neither pregnant nor lactating women who received either the mRNA-1273 (Moderna) or BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) COVID-19 vaccines and 22 pregnant and 6 nonpregnant unvaccinated women with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Main Outcomes And Measures: SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain binding, neutralizing, and functional nonneutralizing antibody responses from pregnant, lactating, and nonpregnant women were assessed following vaccination. Spike-specific T-cell responses were evaluated using IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot and multiparameter intracellular cytokine-staining assays. Humoral and cellular immune responses were determined against the original SARS-CoV-2 USA-WA1/2020 strain as well as against the B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 variants.

Results: This study enrolled 103 women aged 18 to 45 years (66% non-Hispanic White) who received a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine. After the second vaccine dose, fever was reported in 4 pregnant women (14%; SD, 6%), 7 lactating women (44%; SD, 12%), and 27 nonpregnant women (52%; SD, 7%). Binding, neutralizing, and functional nonneutralizing antibody responses as well as CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses were present in pregnant, lactating, and nonpregnant women following vaccination. Binding and neutralizing antibodies were also observed in infant cord blood and breast milk. Binding and neutralizing antibody titers against the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 variants of concern were reduced, but T-cell responses were preserved against viral variants.

Conclusion And Relevance: In this exploratory analysis of a convenience sample, receipt of a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine was immunogenic in pregnant women, and vaccine-elicited antibodies were transported to infant cord blood and breast milk. Pregnant and nonpregnant women who were vaccinated developed cross-reactive antibody responses and T-cell responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2021.7563DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8120446PMC
June 2021

Cumulative clinical experience with MF59-adjuvanted trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine in young children and adults 65 years of age and older.

Int J Infect Dis 2019 Aug 20;85S:S10-S17. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Novartis Vaccines & Diagnostics, GmbH Marburg, Germany.

Objective: To assess the long-term safety of MF59-adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccine (aIIV3; Fluad™) in adults ≥65 years of age.

Methods: Data from 36 primary vaccination and 7 re-vaccination Phase I through III trials were analyzed; 7532 subjects received aIIV3 and 5198 subjects a nonadjuvanted trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). These trials were evaluated in 2 data poolings: first-dose randomized controlled trials (FD-RCT) and revaccination trials. Spontaneously reported adverse events (AEs) from post-marketing surveillance were also analyzed.

Results: The percentages of subjects reporting AEs following vaccination were similar between aIIV3 and IIV3: 24.8% for aIIV3 vs 26.7% for IIV3 (relative risk [RR] 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.01). The percentage of subjects with serious AEs was 6.7% for aIIV3 vs 7.0% for IIV3 (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.82-1.09). Percentages of subjects with AEs leading to withdrawal, hospitalizations, adverse events of special interest (AESIs), and deaths between vaccination groups were similar. There was no signal of disproportionality for AESIs associated with aIIV3 compared to IIV3 in the post-marketing database.

Conclusions: This integrated safety analysis demonstrates an acceptable safety profile for aIIV3 in adults ≥65 years of age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2019.03.020DOI Listing
August 2019

DDT and Obesity in Humans: Exploring the Evidence in a New Way.

Authors:
Julia R Barrett

Environ Health Perspect 2018 02 22;126(2):024003. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP2545DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6066343PMC
February 2018

Reconciling Sex-Related Bias: An Alternative Method for Data Analysis.

Authors:
Julia R Barrett

Environ Health Perspect 2017 10 3;125(10):104001. Epub 2017 Oct 3.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP2473DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5933299PMC
October 2017

Studies Need More than a Spot Sample: Variability of Urinary Metal Levels over Time.

Authors:
Julia R Barrett

Environ Health Perspect 2016 Apr;124(4):A77

Julia R. Barrett, MS, ELS, a Madison, WI-based science writer and editor, is a member of the National Association of Science Writers and the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.124-A77DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4829999PMC
April 2016
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