Publications by authors named "Jukka I Salonen"

5 Publications

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Antibacterial effect of bioactive glasses on clinically important anaerobic bacteria in vitro.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2008 Feb 10;19(2):547-51. Epub 2007 Jul 10.

Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 13, Turku, Finland.

Bioactive glasses (BAGs) of different compositions have been studied for decades for clinical use and they have found many dental and orthopaedic applications. Particulate BAGs have also been shown to have antibacterial properties. This large-scale study shows that two bioactive glass powders (S53P4 and 13-93) and a sol-gel derived material (CaPSiO II) have an antibacterial effect on 17 clinically important anaerobic bacterial species. All the materials tested demonstrated growth inhibition, although the concentration and time needed for the effect varied depending on the BAG. Glass S53P4 had a strong growth-inhibitory effect on all pathogens tested. Glass 13-93 and sol-gel derived material CaPSiO II showed moderate antibacterial properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-007-3018-5DOI Listing
February 2008

Bactericidal effects of bioactive glasses on clinically important aerobic bacteria.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2008 Jan 14;19(1):27-32. Epub 2007 Jun 14.

Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 13, Turku 20500, Finland.

Bioactive glasses (BAGs) have been studied for decades for clinical use, and they have found many dental and orthopedic applications. BAGs have also been shown to have an antibacterial effect e.g., on some oral microorganisms. In this extensive work we show that six powdered BAGs and two sol-gel derived materials have a clear antibacterial effect on 29 clinically important bacterial species. We also incorporated a rapid and accurate flow cytometric (FCM) method to calculate and standardize the numbers of viable bacteria inoculated in the suspensions used in the tests for antibacterial activity. In all materials tested growth inhibition could be demonstrated, although the concentration and time needed for the effect varied depending on the BAG. The most effective glass was S53P4, which had a clear growth-inhibitory effect on all pathogens tested. The sol-gel derived materials CaPSiO and CaPSiO II also showed a strong antibacterial effect. In summary, BAGs were found to clearly inhibit the growth of a wide selection of bacterial species causing e.g., infections on the surfaces of prostheses in the body after implantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-007-3143-1DOI Listing
January 2008

Heat curing of UTMA-based hybrid resin: effects on the degree of conversion and cytotoxicity.

Odontology 2004 Sep;92(1):27-35

Department of Crown and Bridge, The Nippon Dental University School of Dentistry at Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

This study was designed to determine the effects of the heat curing time on a urethane tetramethacrylate (UTMA)-based hybrid resin and specifically on the degree of conversion (DC) and cytotoxicity. The materials used in this study were Estenia, a new-generation hybrid resin, and an experimental fiber reinforcement, Br-100. The DC values of the hybrid resin samples were measured using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer after 180 s of light curing followed by heat curing (0, 15, 30, and 60 min). A method comparing intensities of C=C and N-H vibrations of the sample was used to calculate the final DC values. FTIR spectra were measured both inside and on the surface of the sample. The calculated DC values increased by increasing the heat curing times. After light curing only and after 15-min heat curing, the DC values inside the samples were smaller than the corresponding DC values at the surfaces of the samples. After 60 min of heat curing, the samples achieved homogeneous polymerization (DC% = 65). The cytotoxicity of the material was studied from the glass fiber-reinforced hybrid resin samples, which were first light cured and then heat cured (15, 30, and 60 min). Cytotoxicity was tested using both direct contact and extract methods. For the extract tests, the test specimens were incubated in a cell culture media at 37 degrees , 54 degrees , or 72 degrees C for 24 h. The heat curing times used had no effect on cytotoxicity. The incubation temperature, however, did have a significant effect. The extract obtained from 72 degrees C incubation showed a cytotoxic effect whereas the others did not. The direct contact test did not show cytotoxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10266-004-0037-2DOI Listing
September 2004

Mineralization of dentin induced by treatment with bioactive glass S53P4 in vitro.

Acta Odontol Scand 2004 Feb;62(1):14-20

Turku Centre for Biomaterials, Turku, Finland.

Dentin hypersensitivity can be managed to occlude dentin tubules, but none of the agents used are components of natural dentin. Using a calcium phosphate precipitation (CPP) method, dentin tubules can be occluded with a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer similar to the major inorganic component of dentin. The CPP method utilizes acidic pH conditions, such as etching of dentin, over the course of several dental treatments. A gentler method can be used to produce a CaP layer on the surface of dentin. By treating with bioactive glass S53P4 (BAG), or regular commercial glass (CG), mineralization occurs in physiologically neutral solutions such as simulated body fluid (SBF) and remineralization solution (RMS). After a short period of immersion, silica is dissolved from both types of glass, but the amount of silica released is much greater from BAG than from CG. The dissolved silica is adsorbed on the surface of dentin during the pretreatment procedure and enhances the mineralization of dentin in SBF. After 14 days' mineralization the dentin is fully covered by the CaP layer, but after 14 days' immersion in RMS decalcification of the dentin occurs. Pretreatment with BAG decreases the degree of decalcification of dentin during the mineralization process. These findings suggest that bioactive glass S53P4 can be used as a therapeutic material for mineralization of dentin and its tubules in a physiological environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016350310008012DOI Listing
February 2004