Publications by authors named "Judith T Burgis"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

South Carolina immediate postpartum long acting reversible contraception program helps patients receive the contraceptive method they desire.

Contraception 2020 01 12;101(1):62. Epub 2019 Sep 12.

Women's and Neonatal Services Administration, Prisma Health Richland Hospital, United States. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.07.147DOI Listing
January 2020

A randomized controlled trial to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and promote postpartum weight loss in overweight and obese women: Health In Pregnancy and Postpartum (HIPP).

Contemp Clin Trials 2018 03 31;66:51-63. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Prevention Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, United States; Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, United States.

Background: Interventions to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and promote postpartum weight loss have yielded modest results, particularly in overweight and obese women.

Objectives: To examine the impact of a theory-based lifestyle intervention on gestational weight gain, postpartum weight loss, and related maternal and child outcomes and to examine race differences in these outcomes.

Design: A randomized controlled trial (target N=400; 200 intervention, 200 standard care; 200 African American, 200 white).

Methods: Overweight and obese African American and white women ≤16weeks gestation are recruited from obstetrics and gynecology clinics in South Carolina. Intervention participants receive two in-depth counseling sessions (early pregnancy and postpartum), telephone counseling, behavioral podcasts, and social media support that target weight self-monitoring and increasing physical activity and healthy dietary behavior practices, guided by Social Cognitive Theory. Standard care participants receive monthly mailings and a matched number of podcasts on non-weight related topics. All intervention activities last from ≤18weeks gestation to 6months after delivery. Gestational weight gain is the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes are meeting gestational weight gain guidelines (inadequate, adequate, excessive), weekly rate of gestational weight gain, postpartum weight retention, physical activity and dietary behaviors, health-related quality of life, and offspring adiposity. Participants are assessed at baseline (≤16weeks gestation), 32weeks gestation, and 6 and 12months postpartum, and offspring are assessed at 6 and 12months.

Summary: HIPP is an innovative study that addresses significant gaps in the literature. Primary outcome results are expected in 2019.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2018.01.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5841597PMC
March 2018

Postpartum transabdominal laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma presenting with abruption and hypertensive emergency.

Am Surg 2015 Jan;81(1):E34-5

Department of Surgery, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2015

Delaying Pap test screening in the adolescent population: an evidence-based approach.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2014 Feb 29;27(1):3-5. Epub 2013 May 29.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

Cervical cancer screening guidelines have evolved significantly over the past ten years in the adolescent population. The objective of this article is to review the cervical screening guidelines in the adolescent population as well as examine the evidence and studies that support delaying screening until 21 years old. Delaying HPV and Papanicolaou testing until 21 years old is safe and will not increase cervical cancer rates in the adolescent population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2013.03.008DOI Listing
February 2014

Knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes related to human papillomavirus infection and vaccination, pap tests, and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among adolescent girls and young women.

J S C Med Assoc 2009 Dec;105(7):267-72

USC, 800 Sumter Street, HESC, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2009

Hyperprolactinemia-related adverse events associated with antipsychotic treatment in children and adolescents.

J Adolesc Health 2009 Jul 9;45(1):70-6. Epub 2009 Mar 9.

Department of Neuropsychiatry, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, 3555 Harden Street Ext., CEB 301, Columbia, SC 29203, USA.

Purpose: To characterize factors related to the development of hyperprolactinemia and the ensuing reproductive/sexual adverse events in children and adolescents treated with antipsychotic and other psychotropic agents, and the additional risk posed for those with comorbid obesity, metabolic, or endocrine disorders.

Methods: A retrospective cohort design evaluating medical and pharmacy claims from South Carolina's Medicaid program was used to compare incidence rates for sexual/reproductive adverse events in 4140 children and adolescents who were newly prescribed one of six atypical or two conventional antipsychotic medications, and a random sample of 4500 children not treated with psychotropic medications, January 1998 to December 2005. Logistic and Cox Proportional Hazards regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed.

Results: The treated cohort was not significantly more likely to evince hyperprolactinemia-related disorders than the control sample, but females and adolescents 13 and older were. Incident reproductive/sexual conditions were more likely for females (odds ratio [OR] = 9.52; confidence interval [CI] = 7.63-11.90), adolescents (OR = 3.91; CI = 3.25-4.70), those also taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (OR = 2.04; CI = 1.56-2.37) or valproic acid derivatives (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.03-1.64), and those with comorbid obesity/weight gain (OR = 1.92; CI = 1.56-2.37), metabolic (OR = 1.41; CI = 1.12-1.78), or endocrine disorders (OR = 2.76; CI = 1.98-3.84).

Conclusion: In this treated cohort, female adolescents exposed to SSRIs or valproic acid derivatives and those with comorbid obesity, metabolic, or endocrine disorders while taking antipsychotics were at higher risk of developing hyperprolactinemia and ensuing sexual/reproductive adverse events.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2008.11.010DOI Listing
July 2009

Cervical cytology screening and management of abnormal cytology in adolescents.

J S C Med Assoc 2009 Feb;105(1):16-9

The consensus guidelines recognize adolescents as a special group and allow for more conservative follow- up of abnormal cytology and histology. The guidelines recognize the role of high rates of HPV infection and reinfection in teens, along with high rates of clearance of HPV and low rates of invasive cervical cancer. Risks of treatment are balanced with risk for disease progression. The cervical cancer vaccine is now recommended for teens. The approved vaccine protects against HPV related disease caused by four subtypes of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18. The Food and Drug Administration has approved the vaccine as routine for 11- and 12-year-old girls. The vaccine is most effective prior to HPV exposure or before the sexual debut. In South Carolina only 4.8% of high school girls indicate having sexual intercourse before age 13. Vaccination provides an opportunity to review risky behaviors with adolescent patients and to encourage healthy, safe lifestyles. Vaccination is not protective for sexually transmitted infections and this can be emphasized at vaccination visits as well. The importance of cancer screening can also be reviewed with patients at vaccination visits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2009

Prepubertal Skene's abscess.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2009 Feb;22(1):e21-2

University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29203, USA.

Background: Skene's glands are believed to be homologues of the prostate gland derived from the urogenital sinus.(1) Complications of Skene's glands occur most often in the third and fourth decades and are rarely seen in premenarchal females.

Case: A 3-year-old presented to her pediatrician with a 9-day complaint of vulvar pain. Both pediatric and gynecologic office examination revealed an enlarged right labium majus and an erythematous area adjacent to the urethra. Examination under anesthesia revealed a Skene's gland abscess that was treated with incision and drainage. The patient experienced complete resolution of symptoms.

Conclusion: A Skene's gland abscess is rare among premenarchal girls. An abscess presenting in a patient complaining of pain can be successfully managed with incision and drainage.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2007.11.004DOI Listing
February 2009

A pure Sertoli cell tumor of the ovary in a 10-year-old female.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2007 Aug;20(4):257-9

Department of OB-GYN, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina 29203, USA.

Study Objective: To document an unusual presentation of a pure Sertoli Cell tumor.

Design: Case report.

Results: We present a 10-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain and diarrhea with no symptoms of puberty. Surgical exploration revealed a metastatic pure Sertoli Cell tumor, which was treated with resection and chemotherapy.

Conclusion: Sertoli cell tumors are rare occurrences and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a prepubescent girl with an abdominal mass.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2007.04.009DOI Listing
August 2007

Pregnancy after Essure placement: report of two cases.

Fertil Steril 2008 Mar 4;89(3):724.e9-11. Epub 2007 Jun 4.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

Objective: To report two cases of pregnancy after placement of Essure micro-inserts.

Design: Case report.

Setting: University-based Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Patient(s): Patient 1, a 38-year-old woman, presented with a positive pregnancy test 7 months after Essure hysteroscopic sterilization. Patient 2, a 35-year-old female, became pregnant approximately 1 year after undergoing the Essure procedure.

Intervention(s): Patient 1 received obstetric ultrasounds, a prophylactic cerclage, a cesarean section, and a tubal ligation. Patient 2 underwent a postprocedure hysterosalpingogram, an obstetric ultrasound, pregnancy termination, diagnostic pelvic ultrasound, and a hysterectomy.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Documentation of normal progress of pregnancy after Essure placement.

Result(s): Patient 1 carried an uncomplicated pregnancy to term with an Essure micro-insert in place. Patient 2 became pregnant despite an hysterosalpingogram showing tubal occlusion and was ultimately found to have a micro-insert perforating the uterine wall.

Conclusion(s): The presence of Essure micro-inserts in the fallopian tubes do not appear to interfere with implantation and pregnancy. Uterine perforation by an Essure micro-insert in proximity to the tubal ostia may mimic proper micro-insert placement and bilateral tubal occlusion on both hysterosalpingogram and saline infusion sonography.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2007.03.075DOI Listing
March 2008

Disseminated gonococcal infection in pregnancy presenting as meningitis and dermatitis.

Obstet Gynecol 2006 Sep;108(3 Pt 2):798-801

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29203, USA.

Background: In 2003, the reported gonorrhea rate among women was 118.8 per 100,000 women. Most gonococcal infections in pregnant women are asymptomatic or produce a mildly symptomatic genital infection. Disseminated infections can occur when gonococcal bacteremia produces extragenital symptoms, most commonly arthritis.

Case: A patient presented in the third trimester of pregnancy with fever, body aches, neck soreness, and skin lesions. There was no arthritis. Cultures performed during evaluation confirmed extragenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Conclusion: A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose disseminated gonococcal infection and prevent disease sequelae.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.AOG.0000209186.84897.f1DOI Listing
September 2006

Hair thread tourniquet syndrome in adolescents: a presentation and review of the literature.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2005 Jun;18(3):155-6

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, 2 Medical Park, Columbia, SC 29203, USA.

Hair thread tourniquet syndrome has been recognized since the 1600s when a strangulating hair was reported around the glans penis. Since that time sporadic reports have appeared in the literature describing strangulation of appendages by human hair. Most often the constriction involves fingers, toes, or the penis. There are several reports of clitoral strangulation. Most cases present to their primary care provider or emergency department. A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis in order to prevent prolonged devascularization. We describe a hair thread tourniquet syndrome of the labia minora in a 13-year-old. It was successfully treated with exam under anesthesia and resection of the devascularized tissue. We believe this is the oldest patient described as well as the only description of hair tourniquet syndrome of the labia minora. Prompt recognition of this unusual condition is essential for treatment of this potentially serious problem.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2005.03.010DOI Listing
June 2005

Communicating with the adolescent gynecology patient.

Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am 2003 Jun;30(2):251-60, v

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, 2 Medical Park, Suite 208, Columbia, SC 29203, USA.

Providing health care to adolescents begins with good communication. Teens appreciate providers who are genuine and not parental. Guidelines to facilitate adolescent communication are presented. A good dialogue with teens can initiate a lifetime of care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0889-8545(03)00030-5DOI Listing
June 2003