Publications by authors named "Judit Balazs"

81 Publications

Excessive and pathological Internet use - Risk-behavior or psychopathology?

Addict Behav 2021 12 9;123:107045. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pathological Internet use (but only with respect to gaming) is classified as mental disorder in the ICD-11. However, there is a large group of adolescents showing excessive Internet use, which may rather be considered adolescent risk-behavior. The aim was to test whether pathological and excessive Internet use should be considered as "psychopathology" or "risk-behavior". A representative, cross-sectional sample of 11.110 students from 10 European Union countries was analyzed. Structural equation models, including the factors "risk-behavior" and "psychopathology" and the variables excessive and pathological Internet use, were tested against each other. "Risk-behavior" was operationalized by several risk-behaviors (e.g. drug abuse, truancy, etc). "Psychopathology" included measures of several mental disorders (e.g. depression, hyperactivity, etc). Excessive Internet use was assessed as the duration and frequency of Internet use. Pathological Internet use was assessed with the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire (i.e., presence of addiction criteria). Excessive Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.484, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.071, p < .007). Pathological Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.333, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.852, p < .001). Chi-square tests determined that the loadings of excessive Internet use (χ (1) = 81.98, p < .001) were significantly stronger on "risk-behavior" than "psychopathology". Vice versa, pathological Internet use loaded significantly stronger on "psychopathology" (χ (1) = 107.10, p < .001). The results indicate that pathological Internet use should rather be considered as psychopathology. Excessive Internet use on the other hand, should be classified as adolescent risk-behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.107045DOI Listing
December 2021

Excessive and pathological Internet use - Risk-behavior or psychopathology?

Addict Behav 2021 12 9;123:107045. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pathological Internet use (but only with respect to gaming) is classified as mental disorder in the ICD-11. However, there is a large group of adolescents showing excessive Internet use, which may rather be considered adolescent risk-behavior. The aim was to test whether pathological and excessive Internet use should be considered as "psychopathology" or "risk-behavior". A representative, cross-sectional sample of 11.110 students from 10 European Union countries was analyzed. Structural equation models, including the factors "risk-behavior" and "psychopathology" and the variables excessive and pathological Internet use, were tested against each other. "Risk-behavior" was operationalized by several risk-behaviors (e.g. drug abuse, truancy, etc). "Psychopathology" included measures of several mental disorders (e.g. depression, hyperactivity, etc). Excessive Internet use was assessed as the duration and frequency of Internet use. Pathological Internet use was assessed with the Young Diagnostic Questionnaire (i.e., presence of addiction criteria). Excessive Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.484, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.071, p < .007). Pathological Internet use loaded on "risk-behavior" (λ = 0.333, p < .001) and on "psychopathology" (λ = 0.852, p < .001). Chi-square tests determined that the loadings of excessive Internet use (χ (1) = 81.98, p < .001) were significantly stronger on "risk-behavior" than "psychopathology". Vice versa, pathological Internet use loaded significantly stronger on "psychopathology" (χ (1) = 107.10, p < .001). The results indicate that pathological Internet use should rather be considered as psychopathology. Excessive Internet use on the other hand, should be classified as adolescent risk-behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.107045DOI Listing
December 2021

Mental health services during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe: Results from the EPA Ambassadors Survey and implications for clinical practice.

Eur Psychiatry 2021 06 9;64(1):e41. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

INSERM, U1266 (Institute of Psychiatry and Neuroscience of Paris), Université de Paris, Paris, France.

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic caused an unprecedented worldwide crisis affecting several sectors, including health, social care, economy and society at large. The World Health Organisation has emphasized that mental health care should be considered as one of the core sectors within the overall COVID-19 health response. By March 2020, recommendations for the organization of mental health services across Europe have been developed by several national and international mental health professional associations.

Methods: The European Psychiatric Association (EPA) surveyed a large European sample of psychiatrists, namely the "EPA Ambassadors", on their clinical experience of the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the treatment of psychiatric patients during the month of April 2020 in order to: a) identify and report the views and experiences of European psychiatrists; and b) represent and share these results with mental health policy makers at European level. Based on the recommendations issued by national psychiatric associations and on the results of our survey, we identified important organisational aspects of mental health care during the peak of the first wave of the COVID-19.

Results: While most of the recommendations followed the same principles, significant differences between countries emerged in service delivery, mainly relating to referrals to outpatients and for inpatient admission, assessments and treatment for people with mental disorders. Compared to previous months, the mean number of patients treated by psychiatrists in outpatient settings halved in April 2020. In the same period, the number of mentally ill patients tested for, or developing, COVID-19 was low. In most of countries, traditional face-to-face visits were replaced by online remote consultations.

Conclusions: Based on our findings we recommend: 1) to implement professional guidelines into practice and harmonize psychiatric clinical practice across Europe; 2) to monitor the treatment outcomes of patients with COVID-19 and pre-existing mental disorders; 3) to keep psychiatric services active by using all available options (for example telepsychiatry); 4) to increase communication and cooperation between different health care providers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/j.eurpsy.2021.2215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8314055PMC
June 2021

Mental health services during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe: Results from the EPA Ambassadors Survey and implications for clinical practice.

Eur Psychiatry 2021 06 9;64(1):e41. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

INSERM, U1266 (Institute of Psychiatry and Neuroscience of Paris), Université de Paris, Paris, France.

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic caused an unprecedented worldwide crisis affecting several sectors, including health, social care, economy and society at large. The World Health Organisation has emphasized that mental health care should be considered as one of the core sectors within the overall COVID-19 health response. By March 2020, recommendations for the organization of mental health services across Europe have been developed by several national and international mental health professional associations.

Methods: The European Psychiatric Association (EPA) surveyed a large European sample of psychiatrists, namely the "EPA Ambassadors", on their clinical experience of the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the treatment of psychiatric patients during the month of April 2020 in order to: a) identify and report the views and experiences of European psychiatrists; and b) represent and share these results with mental health policy makers at European level. Based on the recommendations issued by national psychiatric associations and on the results of our survey, we identified important organisational aspects of mental health care during the peak of the first wave of the COVID-19.

Results: While most of the recommendations followed the same principles, significant differences between countries emerged in service delivery, mainly relating to referrals to outpatients and for inpatient admission, assessments and treatment for people with mental disorders. Compared to previous months, the mean number of patients treated by psychiatrists in outpatient settings halved in April 2020. In the same period, the number of mentally ill patients tested for, or developing, COVID-19 was low. In most of countries, traditional face-to-face visits were replaced by online remote consultations.

Conclusions: Based on our findings we recommend: 1) to implement professional guidelines into practice and harmonize psychiatric clinical practice across Europe; 2) to monitor the treatment outcomes of patients with COVID-19 and pre-existing mental disorders; 3) to keep psychiatric services active by using all available options (for example telepsychiatry); 4) to increase communication and cooperation between different health care providers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/j.eurpsy.2021.2215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8314055PMC
June 2021

The Association between Prosocial Behaviour and Peer Relationships with Comorbid Externalizing Disorders and Quality of Life in Treatment-Naïve Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Brain Sci 2021 Apr 9;11(4). Epub 2021 Apr 9.

Department of Developmental and Clinical Child Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, 1064 Budapest, Hungary.

Several recent studies confirmed that Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has a negative influence on peer relationship and quality of life in children. The aim of the current study is to investigate the association between prosocial behaviour, peer relationships and quality of life in treatment naïve ADHD samples. The samples included 79 children with ADHD (64 boys and 15 girls, mean age = 10.24 years, SD = 2.51) and 54 healthy control children (30 boys and 23 girls, mean age = 9.66 years, SD = 1.73). Measurements included: The "Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Kid; Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire" and the "Inventar zur Erfassung der Lebensqualität bei Kindern und Jugendlichen". The ADHD group showed significantly lower levels of prosocial behaviour and more problems with peer relationships than the control group. Prosocial behaviour has a weak positive correlation with the rating of the child's quality of life by the parents, both in the ADHD group and in the control group. The rating of quality of life and peer relationship problems by the parents also showed a significant negative moderate association in both groups. The rating of quality of life by the child showed a significant negative weak relationship with peer relationships in the ADHD group, but no significant relationship was found in the control group. Children with ADHD and comorbid externalizing disorders showed more problems in peer relationships than ADHD without comorbid externalizing disorders. Based on these results, we conclude that therapy for ADHD focused on improvement of prosocial behaviour and peer relationships as well as comorbid externalizing disorders could have a favourable effect on the quality of life of these children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11040475DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8069734PMC
April 2021

[Coronavirus Pandemic - #STAYHOME: How Are You Holding Up? Questions And Tips For 11-18-Year-Olds To Make It Better].

Neuropsychopharmacol Hung 2021 03;23(1):208-214

Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, Pszichológiai Intézet, Budapest, Hungary.

Purpose: Adolescents have to cope with several challenges and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with many of those incongruent with the typical developmental tasks of adolescent age. Some adolescents might be particularly vulnerable in this situation, including those who are deprived of psychological, social or health care services and/or are exposed to abuse or neglect in their home environment. The aims of the current international multicentre follow-up study are to: 1. collect data on the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after the pandemic; 2. improve their mental health by providing an online prevention program that addresses their actual needs; 3. accelerate the development of culturally adapted prevention programs by involving an international team, and 4. to contribute to adequate preparation for any potentially occurring, similar situationin the future.

Methods: Participants aged 11-18 years and their parents/caregivers from diff erent parts of Europe and non-European countries are recruited online. Data are collected regularly in a follow-up study by means of structured self-administered online questionnaires on adolescents' mental health, quality of life and current attitudes and needs. The baseline data collection was in March 2020 at first restrictions of the COVID pandemic in Europe. It is followed up several times (at the beginning weekly, later monthly, bi-monthly, three-monthly) to study changes in mental health, quality of life and attitudes of children and adolescents during the coronavirus disease pandemic. Data were collected by means of structured questionnaires (see below). The time frame of the study is set to one year from study start, March 2021. The last data collection was done in December 2020. The prevention program is developed and provided based on continuously analysed incoming data.

Conclusions: Prevention based on the results of the study is expected to contribute to maintaining adolescents' mental health, improve their quality of life, increase their and their environment's cooperation with the necessary restrictions during the pandemic, and to make reintegration easier once the restrictions are over. Furthermore, the study has the potential to inform on the wellbeing of children and adolescents in extreme situations in general, thus contribute to future preventive measures and policymaking. Implications and Contribution: The proposed international online follow-up study is expected to provide scientifi c evidence for 1. possible changes in the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after a pandemic situation, 2. the eff ectiveness of a culturally adapted prevention program developed to address challenges associated with these changes.
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March 2021

[Coronavirus Pandemic - #STAYHOME: How Are You Holding Up? Questions And Tips For 11-18-Year-Olds To Make It Better].

Neuropsychopharmacol Hung 2021 03;23(1):208-214

Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, Pszichológiai Intézet, Budapest, Hungary.

Purpose: Adolescents have to cope with several challenges and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with many of those incongruent with the typical developmental tasks of adolescent age. Some adolescents might be particularly vulnerable in this situation, including those who are deprived of psychological, social or health care services and/or are exposed to abuse or neglect in their home environment. The aims of the current international multicentre follow-up study are to: 1. collect data on the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after the pandemic; 2. improve their mental health by providing an online prevention program that addresses their actual needs; 3. accelerate the development of culturally adapted prevention programs by involving an international team, and 4. to contribute to adequate preparation for any potentially occurring, similar situationin the future.

Methods: Participants aged 11-18 years and their parents/caregivers from diff erent parts of Europe and non-European countries are recruited online. Data are collected regularly in a follow-up study by means of structured self-administered online questionnaires on adolescents' mental health, quality of life and current attitudes and needs. The baseline data collection was in March 2020 at first restrictions of the COVID pandemic in Europe. It is followed up several times (at the beginning weekly, later monthly, bi-monthly, three-monthly) to study changes in mental health, quality of life and attitudes of children and adolescents during the coronavirus disease pandemic. Data were collected by means of structured questionnaires (see below). The time frame of the study is set to one year from study start, March 2021. The last data collection was done in December 2020. The prevention program is developed and provided based on continuously analysed incoming data.

Conclusions: Prevention based on the results of the study is expected to contribute to maintaining adolescents' mental health, improve their quality of life, increase their and their environment's cooperation with the necessary restrictions during the pandemic, and to make reintegration easier once the restrictions are over. Furthermore, the study has the potential to inform on the wellbeing of children and adolescents in extreme situations in general, thus contribute to future preventive measures and policymaking. Implications and Contribution: The proposed international online follow-up study is expected to provide scientifi c evidence for 1. possible changes in the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after a pandemic situation, 2. the eff ectiveness of a culturally adapted prevention program developed to address challenges associated with these changes.
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March 2021

[Coronavirus Pandemic - #STAYHOME: How Are You Holding Up? Questions And Tips For 11-18-Year-Olds To Make It Better].

Neuropsychopharmacol Hung 2021 03;23(1):208-214

Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, Pszichológiai Intézet, Budapest, Hungary.

Purpose: Adolescents have to cope with several challenges and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with many of those incongruent with the typical developmental tasks of adolescent age. Some adolescents might be particularly vulnerable in this situation, including those who are deprived of psychological, social or health care services and/or are exposed to abuse or neglect in their home environment. The aims of the current international multicentre follow-up study are to: 1. collect data on the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after the pandemic; 2. improve their mental health by providing an online prevention program that addresses their actual needs; 3. accelerate the development of culturally adapted prevention programs by involving an international team, and 4. to contribute to adequate preparation for any potentially occurring, similar situationin the future.

Methods: Participants aged 11-18 years and their parents/caregivers from diff erent parts of Europe and non-European countries are recruited online. Data are collected regularly in a follow-up study by means of structured self-administered online questionnaires on adolescents' mental health, quality of life and current attitudes and needs. The baseline data collection was in March 2020 at first restrictions of the COVID pandemic in Europe. It is followed up several times (at the beginning weekly, later monthly, bi-monthly, three-monthly) to study changes in mental health, quality of life and attitudes of children and adolescents during the coronavirus disease pandemic. Data were collected by means of structured questionnaires (see below). The time frame of the study is set to one year from study start, March 2021. The last data collection was done in December 2020. The prevention program is developed and provided based on continuously analysed incoming data.

Conclusions: Prevention based on the results of the study is expected to contribute to maintaining adolescents' mental health, improve their quality of life, increase their and their environment's cooperation with the necessary restrictions during the pandemic, and to make reintegration easier once the restrictions are over. Furthermore, the study has the potential to inform on the wellbeing of children and adolescents in extreme situations in general, thus contribute to future preventive measures and policymaking. Implications and Contribution: The proposed international online follow-up study is expected to provide scientifi c evidence for 1. possible changes in the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after a pandemic situation, 2. the eff ectiveness of a culturally adapted prevention program developed to address challenges associated with these changes.
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March 2021

[Coronavirus Pandemic - #STAYHOME: How Are You Holding Up? Questions And Tips For 11-18-Year-Olds To Make It Better].

Neuropsychopharmacol Hung 2021 03;23(1):208-214

Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, Pszichológiai Intézet, Budapest, Hungary.

Purpose: Adolescents have to cope with several challenges and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with many of those incongruent with the typical developmental tasks of adolescent age. Some adolescents might be particularly vulnerable in this situation, including those who are deprived of psychological, social or health care services and/or are exposed to abuse or neglect in their home environment. The aims of the current international multicentre follow-up study are to: 1. collect data on the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after the pandemic; 2. improve their mental health by providing an online prevention program that addresses their actual needs; 3. accelerate the development of culturally adapted prevention programs by involving an international team, and 4. to contribute to adequate preparation for any potentially occurring, similar situationin the future.

Methods: Participants aged 11-18 years and their parents/caregivers from diff erent parts of Europe and non-European countries are recruited online. Data are collected regularly in a follow-up study by means of structured self-administered online questionnaires on adolescents' mental health, quality of life and current attitudes and needs. The baseline data collection was in March 2020 at first restrictions of the COVID pandemic in Europe. It is followed up several times (at the beginning weekly, later monthly, bi-monthly, three-monthly) to study changes in mental health, quality of life and attitudes of children and adolescents during the coronavirus disease pandemic. Data were collected by means of structured questionnaires (see below). The time frame of the study is set to one year from study start, March 2021. The last data collection was done in December 2020. The prevention program is developed and provided based on continuously analysed incoming data.

Conclusions: Prevention based on the results of the study is expected to contribute to maintaining adolescents' mental health, improve their quality of life, increase their and their environment's cooperation with the necessary restrictions during the pandemic, and to make reintegration easier once the restrictions are over. Furthermore, the study has the potential to inform on the wellbeing of children and adolescents in extreme situations in general, thus contribute to future preventive measures and policymaking. Implications and Contribution: The proposed international online follow-up study is expected to provide scientifi c evidence for 1. possible changes in the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after a pandemic situation, 2. the eff ectiveness of a culturally adapted prevention program developed to address challenges associated with these changes.
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March 2021

[Coronavirus Pandemic - #STAYHOME: How Are You Holding Up? Questions And Tips For 11-18-Year-Olds To Make It Better].

Neuropsychopharmacol Hung 2021 03;23(1):208-214

Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, Pszichológiai Intézet, Budapest, Hungary.

Purpose: Adolescents have to cope with several challenges and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with many of those incongruent with the typical developmental tasks of adolescent age. Some adolescents might be particularly vulnerable in this situation, including those who are deprived of psychological, social or health care services and/or are exposed to abuse or neglect in their home environment. The aims of the current international multicentre follow-up study are to: 1. collect data on the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after the pandemic; 2. improve their mental health by providing an online prevention program that addresses their actual needs; 3. accelerate the development of culturally adapted prevention programs by involving an international team, and 4. to contribute to adequate preparation for any potentially occurring, similar situationin the future.

Methods: Participants aged 11-18 years and their parents/caregivers from diff erent parts of Europe and non-European countries are recruited online. Data are collected regularly in a follow-up study by means of structured self-administered online questionnaires on adolescents' mental health, quality of life and current attitudes and needs. The baseline data collection was in March 2020 at first restrictions of the COVID pandemic in Europe. It is followed up several times (at the beginning weekly, later monthly, bi-monthly, three-monthly) to study changes in mental health, quality of life and attitudes of children and adolescents during the coronavirus disease pandemic. Data were collected by means of structured questionnaires (see below). The time frame of the study is set to one year from study start, March 2021. The last data collection was done in December 2020. The prevention program is developed and provided based on continuously analysed incoming data.

Conclusions: Prevention based on the results of the study is expected to contribute to maintaining adolescents' mental health, improve their quality of life, increase their and their environment's cooperation with the necessary restrictions during the pandemic, and to make reintegration easier once the restrictions are over. Furthermore, the study has the potential to inform on the wellbeing of children and adolescents in extreme situations in general, thus contribute to future preventive measures and policymaking. Implications and Contribution: The proposed international online follow-up study is expected to provide scientifi c evidence for 1. possible changes in the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after a pandemic situation, 2. the eff ectiveness of a culturally adapted prevention program developed to address challenges associated with these changes.
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March 2021

[Coronavirus Pandemic - #STAYHOME: How Are You Holding Up? Questions And Tips For 11-18-Year-Olds To Make It Better].

Neuropsychopharmacol Hung 2021 03;23(1):208-214

Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, Pszichológiai Intézet, Budapest, Hungary.

Purpose: Adolescents have to cope with several challenges and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with many of those incongruent with the typical developmental tasks of adolescent age. Some adolescents might be particularly vulnerable in this situation, including those who are deprived of psychological, social or health care services and/or are exposed to abuse or neglect in their home environment. The aims of the current international multicentre follow-up study are to: 1. collect data on the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after the pandemic; 2. improve their mental health by providing an online prevention program that addresses their actual needs; 3. accelerate the development of culturally adapted prevention programs by involving an international team, and 4. to contribute to adequate preparation for any potentially occurring, similar situationin the future.

Methods: Participants aged 11-18 years and their parents/caregivers from diff erent parts of Europe and non-European countries are recruited online. Data are collected regularly in a follow-up study by means of structured self-administered online questionnaires on adolescents' mental health, quality of life and current attitudes and needs. The baseline data collection was in March 2020 at first restrictions of the COVID pandemic in Europe. It is followed up several times (at the beginning weekly, later monthly, bi-monthly, three-monthly) to study changes in mental health, quality of life and attitudes of children and adolescents during the coronavirus disease pandemic. Data were collected by means of structured questionnaires (see below). The time frame of the study is set to one year from study start, March 2021. The last data collection was done in December 2020. The prevention program is developed and provided based on continuously analysed incoming data.

Conclusions: Prevention based on the results of the study is expected to contribute to maintaining adolescents' mental health, improve their quality of life, increase their and their environment's cooperation with the necessary restrictions during the pandemic, and to make reintegration easier once the restrictions are over. Furthermore, the study has the potential to inform on the wellbeing of children and adolescents in extreme situations in general, thus contribute to future preventive measures and policymaking. Implications and Contribution: The proposed international online follow-up study is expected to provide scientifi c evidence for 1. possible changes in the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after a pandemic situation, 2. the eff ectiveness of a culturally adapted prevention program developed to address challenges associated with these changes.
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March 2021

[Coronavirus Pandemic - #STAYHOME: How Are You Holding Up? Questions And Tips For 11-18-Year-Olds To Make It Better].

Neuropsychopharmacol Hung 2021 03;23(1):208-214

Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, Pszichológiai Intézet, Budapest, Hungary.

Purpose: Adolescents have to cope with several challenges and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with many of those incongruent with the typical developmental tasks of adolescent age. Some adolescents might be particularly vulnerable in this situation, including those who are deprived of psychological, social or health care services and/or are exposed to abuse or neglect in their home environment. The aims of the current international multicentre follow-up study are to: 1. collect data on the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after the pandemic; 2. improve their mental health by providing an online prevention program that addresses their actual needs; 3. accelerate the development of culturally adapted prevention programs by involving an international team, and 4. to contribute to adequate preparation for any potentially occurring, similar situationin the future.

Methods: Participants aged 11-18 years and their parents/caregivers from diff erent parts of Europe and non-European countries are recruited online. Data are collected regularly in a follow-up study by means of structured self-administered online questionnaires on adolescents' mental health, quality of life and current attitudes and needs. The baseline data collection was in March 2020 at first restrictions of the COVID pandemic in Europe. It is followed up several times (at the beginning weekly, later monthly, bi-monthly, three-monthly) to study changes in mental health, quality of life and attitudes of children and adolescents during the coronavirus disease pandemic. Data were collected by means of structured questionnaires (see below). The time frame of the study is set to one year from study start, March 2021. The last data collection was done in December 2020. The prevention program is developed and provided based on continuously analysed incoming data.

Conclusions: Prevention based on the results of the study is expected to contribute to maintaining adolescents' mental health, improve their quality of life, increase their and their environment's cooperation with the necessary restrictions during the pandemic, and to make reintegration easier once the restrictions are over. Furthermore, the study has the potential to inform on the wellbeing of children and adolescents in extreme situations in general, thus contribute to future preventive measures and policymaking. Implications and Contribution: The proposed international online follow-up study is expected to provide scientifi c evidence for 1. possible changes in the mental health and quality of life of adolescents during and after a pandemic situation, 2. the eff ectiveness of a culturally adapted prevention program developed to address challenges associated with these changes.
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March 2021

Parent-early adolescent relationship quality and problem behavior in Hungary, the Netherlands, India, and Iceland.

Scand J Psychol 2020 Dec 27;61(6):763-774. Epub 2020 Jul 27.

Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.

Higher parent-child relationship quality has been associated with less internalizing and externalizing problem behavior. However, it remained less clear whether these associations are universal or depend on the country under investigation. Furthermore, fathers are still understudied, even though there is increasing evidence of their important role in early adolescent development. Our study compared the association of mother-child as well as father-child relationship quality with early adolescents' problem behavior in four culturally different countries, namely Hungary (N = 293; M  = 11.22; 53% boys), the Netherlands (N = 242; M  = 11.20; 48% boys), India (N = 230; M  = 10.68; 61% boys), and Iceland (N = 261; M  = 10.90; 53% boys). Early adolescents filled out questionnaires in their classroom, assessing warmth and conflict with fathers and mothers and internalizing and externalizing problem behavior. Stepwise multi-group path analysis demonstrated no cross-cultural differences in associations between quality of the parent-child relationship and problem behavior. We did not find any effects of maternal or paternal warmth. However, across samples conflict with mothers was associated with more internalizing and externalizing problem behavior, and conflict with fathers was associated with more externalizing problem behavior. Our findings highlight the need to target conflict with both fathers and mothers in interventions across different countries, especially when addressing externalizing problem behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sjop.12667DOI Listing
December 2020

Acute Physical Activity, Executive Function, and Attention Performance in Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Typically Developing Children: An Experimental Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 06 7;17(11). Epub 2020 Jun 7.

Department of Developmental and Clinical Child Psychology, Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Izabella St. 46, 1064 Budapest, Hungary.

A growing number of studies support the theory that physical activity can effectively foster the cognitive function of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study examines the effect of acute moderate physical activity on the executive functions and attention performance of (1) typically developing children (without psychological, psychiatric or neurological diagnosis and/or associated treatment stated in their medical history); (2) treatment-naïve ADHD children; and (3) medicated children with ADHD. In the current study, a total sample of 150 (50 non-medicated, 50 medicated, and 50 typically developing) children between the ages of 6 and 12 took part in the experiment. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (MINI Kid) was used to measure ADHD and the child version of the Test of Attentional Performance (KiTAP) was applied to evaluate the children's attentional and executive function performance before and after two types of intervention. In order to compare the effects of physical activity and control intervention, half of the children from each group (25 participants) took part in a 20-min long, moderately intense physical activity session on the 60-80% of their maximum heart rate, while watching a cartoon video. In the control condition, the other half of the children (25 participants) from each group watched the same cartoon video for 20 min while seated. Physical activity (compared to the just video watching control condition) had a significantly positive influence on 2 out of 15 measured parameters (median reaction time in the alertness task and error rates in the divided attention task) for the medicated group and on 2 out of the 15 measured variables (number of total errors and errors when distractor was presented, both in the distractibility task) regarding the treatment-naïve group. Future studies should focus on finding the optimal type, intensity, and duration of physical activity that could be a potential complementary intervention in treating deficits regarding ADHD in children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7312258PMC
June 2020

Acute Physical Activity, Executive Function, and Attention Performance in Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Typically Developing Children: An Experimental Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 06 7;17(11). Epub 2020 Jun 7.

Department of Developmental and Clinical Child Psychology, Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Izabella St. 46, 1064 Budapest, Hungary.

A growing number of studies support the theory that physical activity can effectively foster the cognitive function of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study examines the effect of acute moderate physical activity on the executive functions and attention performance of (1) typically developing children (without psychological, psychiatric or neurological diagnosis and/or associated treatment stated in their medical history); (2) treatment-naïve ADHD children; and (3) medicated children with ADHD. In the current study, a total sample of 150 (50 non-medicated, 50 medicated, and 50 typically developing) children between the ages of 6 and 12 took part in the experiment. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (MINI Kid) was used to measure ADHD and the child version of the Test of Attentional Performance (KiTAP) was applied to evaluate the children's attentional and executive function performance before and after two types of intervention. In order to compare the effects of physical activity and control intervention, half of the children from each group (25 participants) took part in a 20-min long, moderately intense physical activity session on the 60-80% of their maximum heart rate, while watching a cartoon video. In the control condition, the other half of the children (25 participants) from each group watched the same cartoon video for 20 min while seated. Physical activity (compared to the just video watching control condition) had a significantly positive influence on 2 out of 15 measured parameters (median reaction time in the alertness task and error rates in the divided attention task) for the medicated group and on 2 out of the 15 measured variables (number of total errors and errors when distractor was presented, both in the distractibility task) regarding the treatment-naïve group. Future studies should focus on finding the optimal type, intensity, and duration of physical activity that could be a potential complementary intervention in treating deficits regarding ADHD in children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7312258PMC
June 2020

Acute Physical Activity, Executive Function, and Attention Performance in Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Typically Developing Children: An Experimental Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 06 7;17(11). Epub 2020 Jun 7.

Department of Developmental and Clinical Child Psychology, Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Izabella St. 46, 1064 Budapest, Hungary.

A growing number of studies support the theory that physical activity can effectively foster the cognitive function of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study examines the effect of acute moderate physical activity on the executive functions and attention performance of (1) typically developing children (without psychological, psychiatric or neurological diagnosis and/or associated treatment stated in their medical history); (2) treatment-naïve ADHD children; and (3) medicated children with ADHD. In the current study, a total sample of 150 (50 non-medicated, 50 medicated, and 50 typically developing) children between the ages of 6 and 12 took part in the experiment. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (MINI Kid) was used to measure ADHD and the child version of the Test of Attentional Performance (KiTAP) was applied to evaluate the children's attentional and executive function performance before and after two types of intervention. In order to compare the effects of physical activity and control intervention, half of the children from each group (25 participants) took part in a 20-min long, moderately intense physical activity session on the 60-80% of their maximum heart rate, while watching a cartoon video. In the control condition, the other half of the children (25 participants) from each group watched the same cartoon video for 20 min while seated. Physical activity (compared to the just video watching control condition) had a significantly positive influence on 2 out of 15 measured parameters (median reaction time in the alertness task and error rates in the divided attention task) for the medicated group and on 2 out of the 15 measured variables (number of total errors and errors when distractor was presented, both in the distractibility task) regarding the treatment-naïve group. Future studies should focus on finding the optimal type, intensity, and duration of physical activity that could be a potential complementary intervention in treating deficits regarding ADHD in children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7312258PMC
June 2020

Psychiatric diagnoses in "healthy" control group of a clinical study and its effects on health related quality of life.

Psychiatr Hung 2020 ;35(1):20-29

Eotvos Lorand Tudomanyegyetem, Pszichologiai Doktori Iskola, Budapest, Hungary, E-mail:

Background: The measure of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among children with mental disorders is still in early ages, even though the worldwide-pooled prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses among children and adolescents is around 13%. Several studies confirmed that these children have impaired social and school functioning and low HRQoL. Mental disorders among children often remain undiagnosed or diagnosed too late, in that case additional negative effects could be expected. The aim of the current study was to identify psychiatric disorders in children who participated in a clinical study as a "healthy" control group and measure its effects on HRQoL.

Methods: The inclusion criteria for control participated children were not having ongoing or previous psychiatric or psychological treatment. In the second step control children (n=79, age range 6-15) were divided into two subgroups according to achieved diagnostic criteria. Measures were Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Kid and Inventory for the Assessment of the Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents. For data analyzing due to unequal sample sizes robust Welch t-test with omega squared, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and logistic regression were applied.

Results: According to the children and parents control group with diagnoses have lower HRQoL in school, peer relationships and mental health dimensions than control group without diagnoses. Furthermore, by the children's report this difference exists in the domain of time spent alone, by the parent proxy report exist in the somatic health and general dimensions. An increasing number of diagnoses decreased HRQoL in most areas. The presence of psychiatric diagnoses by children increase 8 times more likely to have low HRQoL in the domain of school and 4 times in the domain of time spent alone.

Conclusions: These results draw attention to the relative high ratio of undiagnosed mental disorders in the control group and for the low HRQoL of these children. Screening of psychiatric disorders in schools should be crucial and the earliest recourse of treatment in the identified children. The findings of this study also underline the importance of assessing HRQoL from different perspectives.
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January 2020

Life Events Predicting the First Onset of Adolescent Direct Self-Injurious Behavior-A Prospective Multicenter Study.

J Adolesc Health 2020 02 31;66(2):195-201. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Purpose: Self-injurious behavior is a frequent phenomenon in adolescence. The present study prospectively examined life events as risk factors for the first onset of direct self-injurious behavior (D-SIB) in the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe school-based multicenter sample.

Methods: Longitudinal assessments with an interval of 1 year were performed within a sample of 1,933 adolescents (51.47% females; mean age 14.84 ± .9 years) from 10 European countries and Israel.

Results: The number of life events during the past 6 months predicted the first onset of D-SIB in the following year. Gender neither predicted the onset of D-SIB nor moderated the association with life events. Moreover, analyses of individual events identified a range of mainly interpersonal events within both family and peer group as proximal risk factors for first episode D-SIB.

Conclusions: The results support the critical role of interpersonal life events in the development of D-SIB for both genders and refine the conceptualization of proximal risk factors in terms of accumulated stressors and interpersonal events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2019.08.018DOI Listing
February 2020

Executive Function and Attention Performance in Children with ADHD: Effects of Medication and Comparison with Typically Developing Children.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019 10 10;16(20). Epub 2019 Oct 10.

Department of Developmental and Clinical Child Psychology, Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Izabella St. 46, 1064 Budapest, Hungary.

The emerging literature reports that children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) show deficits in executive functioning. To date, the combination of drug therapy with certain evidence-based non-medication interventions has been proven to be the most effective treatment for ADHD. There is a gap in the literature regarding comparing the executive functions (EF) of treatment naïve and medicated children with ADHD with both each other and typically developing children. Altogether, 50 treatment naïve and 50 medicated children with ADHD and 50 typically developing children between the ages of six and 12 were enrolled. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (Mini Kid) and the Test of Attentional Performance for Children (KiTAP) measures were employed. Treatment naïve children with ADHD showed weaker performance on most executive function measures (12 out of 15) than either the medicated ADHD group or the controls. There were no significant differences between the medicated ADHD children and typically developing children in most KiTAP parameters (10 out of 15). Executive function impairments were observable in treatment naïve ADHD children, which draws attention to the importance of treating ADHD. Future studies should focus on the specific effects of stimulant medication on executive functions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203822DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6843761PMC
October 2019

Long-Term Effects of Multimodal Treatment on Psychopathology and Health-Related Quality of Life of Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Front Psychol 2019 24;10:2037. Epub 2019 Sep 24.

Department of Developmental and Clinical Child Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.

Aim: The current study aimed to examine the association between long-term (36 months) multimodal (pharmacological and psychological) treatment and psychopathology and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from the perspectives of both the children and parents.

Methods: The sample consisted of 23 children with ADHD (21 boys, 2 girls, mean age = 13.46 years, = 2.36) and 23 healthy control children (11 boys, 12 girls, mean age = 12.49 years, = 1.75). The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (MINI Kid) was applied to measure psychopathology and both parent and self-rated versions of the Inventory for the Measure of the Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents were used to assess HRQoL at baseline and at the 36-month follow-up visit. The ADHD group took part in multimodal (medical and behavioral) therapy. The healthy control group did not get any intervention.

Results: At the baseline, the ADHD group was characterized with higher scores in nine MINI Kid scales and showed lower HRQoL than the control group according to both children and their parents. At the 36-month follow-up visit six scale scores (ADHD, social phobia, oppositional defiance and conduct disorder, major depressive episode, dysthymic disorder) showed statistically significant decreases in the ADHD group, while these scores were constant in the control group. Parent-rated HRQoL was significantly lower in the clinical group at baseline than at the end of the study, but there were no significant changes in the control group. Self-reported changes in HRQoL matched parent-reported changes.

Interpretation: Multimodal therapy is associated with decreased psychopathology and improved HRQoL over the long term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6769122PMC
September 2019

[Quality of life of adolescents with conduct disorder: gender differences and comorbidity with oppositional defiant disorder].

Psychiatr Hung 2019 ;34(3):280-286

ELTE PPK, Pszichologiai Doktori Iskola, Budapest, Hungary, E-mail:

Background: Quality of life is the individuals' subjective evaluation of their general well-being, including physical and mental health, social relationships and everyday functionality. The aim of our study was to examine conduct disorder in terms of gender differences in prevalence, and relationship to quality of life domains in the presence or absence of comorbid oppositional defiant disorder.

Methods: Altogether 392 adolescents, aged 13-18 years (M=14.5; SD= 1.37), participated in this study. The members of the clinical group were selected from Vadaskert Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Hospital, Budapest, Hungary with externalizing symptoms in their case history. The control group was selected from public schools in Budapest, Hungary. Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Kid was used to diagnose conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, and parent and adolescent version of the Inventory of Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents (Inventar zur Erfassung der Lebensqualität bei Kindern und Jugendlichen) was used to measure the children's quality of life.

Results: In this sample 8.5% of adolescents were diagnosed with conduct disorder, of which 52.9% had a comorbid oppositional defiant diagnosis. Conduct disorder diagnosis was only present in the clinical group, 9 of participants with such diagnosis were male and 24 were female. Girls with conduct disorder evaluated their family life domain (p<0.01) and their global quality of life (p<0.05) lower than the boys. Compared to adolescents without comorbid oppositional defiant disorder diagnosis, adolescents with conduct disorder and comorbid oppositional defiant disorder had significantly worse quality of life in the domain of time spent alone (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Conduct disorder is associated with decreased quality of life. The presence of comorbid oppositional defiant disorder correlates with lower quality of life in several domains. These findings are considerable for the clinical management of these externalizing disorders.
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October 2019

[Quality of life of adolescents with conduct disorder: gender differences and comorbidity with oppositional defiant disorder].

Psychiatr Hung 2019 ;34(3):280-286

ELTE PPK, Pszichologiai Doktori Iskola, Budapest, Hungary, E-mail:

Background: Quality of life is the individuals' subjective evaluation of their general well-being, including physical and mental health, social relationships and everyday functionality. The aim of our study was to examine conduct disorder in terms of gender differences in prevalence, and relationship to quality of life domains in the presence or absence of comorbid oppositional defiant disorder.

Methods: Altogether 392 adolescents, aged 13-18 years (M=14.5; SD= 1.37), participated in this study. The members of the clinical group were selected from Vadaskert Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Hospital, Budapest, Hungary with externalizing symptoms in their case history. The control group was selected from public schools in Budapest, Hungary. Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Kid was used to diagnose conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, and parent and adolescent version of the Inventory of Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents (Inventar zur Erfassung der Lebensqualität bei Kindern und Jugendlichen) was used to measure the children's quality of life.

Results: In this sample 8.5% of adolescents were diagnosed with conduct disorder, of which 52.9% had a comorbid oppositional defiant diagnosis. Conduct disorder diagnosis was only present in the clinical group, 9 of participants with such diagnosis were male and 24 were female. Girls with conduct disorder evaluated their family life domain (p<0.01) and their global quality of life (p<0.05) lower than the boys. Compared to adolescents without comorbid oppositional defiant disorder diagnosis, adolescents with conduct disorder and comorbid oppositional defiant disorder had significantly worse quality of life in the domain of time spent alone (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Conduct disorder is associated with decreased quality of life. The presence of comorbid oppositional defiant disorder correlates with lower quality of life in several domains. These findings are considerable for the clinical management of these externalizing disorders.
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October 2019

Psychopathology is associated with reproductive health risk in European adolescents.

Reprod Health 2018 Nov 6;15(1):186. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Reproductive and mental health are key domains of adolescent wellbeing but possible interrelationships are poorly understood. This cross-sectional study evaluated the association between psychopathology and reproductive health risk among European adolescents.

Methods: A structured self-report questionnaire was delivered to 12,395 pupils of 179 randomly selected schools in 11 European countries within the EU funded "Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe" (SEYLE) project. The questionnaire included items about sexual initiation and reproductive health risk factors, such as number of sexual partners, frequency of condom use, and pregnancy involvement. Psychopathology was evaluated with validated instruments and/or ad-hoc questions.

Results: Of 11,406 respondents (median age 15; interquartile range [IQR] 14-15; 57% females), 18.8% reported sexual initiation. Sixty percent of them also reported at least one reproductive risk factor. Sexual initiation was significantly more common among pupils older than 15 years (38% versus 13.2% younger pupils) and males (21.3% versus 16.9% females). It was also more common among pupils with depression (age/sex-adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.871), anxiety (aOR 2.190), severe suicidal ideation (aOR 2.259), self-injurious behaviour (aOR 2.892), and suicide attempts (aOR 3.091). These associations were particularly strong among pupils ≤15 years old and, for overt psychopathology, among pupils with low non-sexual risk behaviour profile and females. Depression (aOR 1.937), anxiety (aOR 2.282), severe suicidal ideation (aOR 2.354), self-injurious behaviour (aOR 3.022), and suicide attempts (aOR 3.284) were associated with higher reproductive health risk, defined by an increasing number of coexisting reproductive risk factors.

Conclusions: These findings suggest an alignment between mental and reproductive health risk and support the value of cross-domain collaboration in adolescent health. The association between psychopathology and reproductive health risk, as well as its variations with age, sex, and associated risk behaviours, should be considered when designing health-promoting or disease-preventing interventions for adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12978-018-0618-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6220505PMC
November 2018

Comorbidity of Physical and Anxiety Symptoms in Adolescent: Functional Impairment, Self-Rated Health and Subjective Well-Being.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2018 08 9;15(8). Epub 2018 Aug 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.

Physical disorders and anxiety are frequently comorbid. This study investigates the characteristics of physical disorders, self-rated heath, subjective well-being and anxiety in adolescents. Data were drawn from the cohort study. From 11 countries 11,230 adolescents, aged 14⁻16 years were included. Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), WHO-5 Well-Being Index and five questions prepared for this study to evaluate physical illnesses and self-rated heath were administered. Anxiety levels were significantly higher in adolescents who reported having physical disability ( < 0.001, Cohen's = 0.40), suffering from chronic illnesses ( < 0.001, Cohen's = 0.40), impairments associated to health conditions ( < 0.001, Cohen's = 0.61), or reported poor to very poor self-rated health ( < 0.001, Cohen's = 1.11). Mediational analyses revealed no direct effect of having a chronic illness/physical disability on subjective well-being, but the indirect effects through higher levels of anxiety were significant. Functional impairment related to health conditions was both directly and indirectly (through higher levels of anxiety) associated with lower well-being. The co-occurrence of anxiety and physical disorders may confer a greater level of disability and lower levels of subjective well-being. Clinicians have to screen anxiety, even in a subthreshold level in patients with choric physical illness or with medically unexplained physical symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081698DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6121583PMC
August 2018

Comorbidity of Physical and Anxiety Symptoms in Adolescent: Functional Impairment, Self-Rated Health and Subjective Well-Being.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2018 08 9;15(8). Epub 2018 Aug 9.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.

Physical disorders and anxiety are frequently comorbid. This study investigates the characteristics of physical disorders, self-rated heath, subjective well-being and anxiety in adolescents. Data were drawn from the cohort study. From 11 countries 11,230 adolescents, aged 14⁻16 years were included. Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), WHO-5 Well-Being Index and five questions prepared for this study to evaluate physical illnesses and self-rated heath were administered. Anxiety levels were significantly higher in adolescents who reported having physical disability ( < 0.001, Cohen's = 0.40), suffering from chronic illnesses ( < 0.001, Cohen's = 0.40), impairments associated to health conditions ( < 0.001, Cohen's = 0.61), or reported poor to very poor self-rated health ( < 0.001, Cohen's = 1.11). Mediational analyses revealed no direct effect of having a chronic illness/physical disability on subjective well-being, but the indirect effects through higher levels of anxiety were significant. Functional impairment related to health conditions was both directly and indirectly (through higher levels of anxiety) associated with lower well-being. The co-occurrence of anxiety and physical disorders may confer a greater level of disability and lower levels of subjective well-being. Clinicians have to screen anxiety, even in a subthreshold level in patients with choric physical illness or with medically unexplained physical symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081698DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6121583PMC
August 2018

Direct Self-Injurious Behavior (D-SIB) and Life Events among Vocational School and High School Students.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2018 05 24;15(6). Epub 2018 May 24.

Institute of Psychology, Eotvos Lorand University, 1075 Budapest, Hungary.

Although several studies have recently assessed direct self-injurious behavior (D-SIB) among adolescents, it is still understudied in adolescents attending vocational schools: an educational setting generally associated with lower socioeconomic status. After extending the "Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe" (SEYLE) project to a vocational school population, we examined their D-SIB and life event characteristics compared to the high school population. SEYLE's Hungarian randomly selected high school sample ( = 995) was completed with a randomly selected vocational school sample ( = 140) in Budapest, Hungary. Participants aged 14⁻17 years completed the SEYLE project's self-administered questionnaires. D-SIB lifetime prevalence was significantly higher (29.4%) in the vocational school group compared to the high school group (17.2%) (Χ²(1) = 12.231, < 0.001). D-SIB was associated with suicidal ideation in the vocational school group. Different life events were more frequent in the high school than in the vocational school group, and associations between D-SIB and life events differed in the vocational school group compared to the high school group. In conclusion, vocational school students are a vulnerable population with a higher prevalence of D-SIB compared to high school students. Life events and their association with D-SIB also differ in vocational school students compared to high school students. Taking all these into account might contribute to prevention/intervention designed for this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6025121PMC
May 2018

Direct Self-Injurious Behavior (D-SIB) and Life Events among Vocational School and High School Students.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2018 05 24;15(6). Epub 2018 May 24.

Institute of Psychology, Eotvos Lorand University, 1075 Budapest, Hungary.

Although several studies have recently assessed direct self-injurious behavior (D-SIB) among adolescents, it is still understudied in adolescents attending vocational schools: an educational setting generally associated with lower socioeconomic status. After extending the "Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe" (SEYLE) project to a vocational school population, we examined their D-SIB and life event characteristics compared to the high school population. SEYLE's Hungarian randomly selected high school sample ( = 995) was completed with a randomly selected vocational school sample ( = 140) in Budapest, Hungary. Participants aged 14⁻17 years completed the SEYLE project's self-administered questionnaires. D-SIB lifetime prevalence was significantly higher (29.4%) in the vocational school group compared to the high school group (17.2%) (Χ²(1) = 12.231, < 0.001). D-SIB was associated with suicidal ideation in the vocational school group. Different life events were more frequent in the high school than in the vocational school group, and associations between D-SIB and life events differed in the vocational school group compared to the high school group. In conclusion, vocational school students are a vulnerable population with a higher prevalence of D-SIB compared to high school students. Life events and their association with D-SIB also differ in vocational school students compared to high school students. Taking all these into account might contribute to prevention/intervention designed for this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6025121PMC
May 2018

Direct Self-Injurious Behavior (D-SIB) and Life Events among Vocational School and High School Students.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2018 05 24;15(6). Epub 2018 May 24.

Institute of Psychology, Eotvos Lorand University, 1075 Budapest, Hungary.

Although several studies have recently assessed direct self-injurious behavior (D-SIB) among adolescents, it is still understudied in adolescents attending vocational schools: an educational setting generally associated with lower socioeconomic status. After extending the "Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe" (SEYLE) project to a vocational school population, we examined their D-SIB and life event characteristics compared to the high school population. SEYLE's Hungarian randomly selected high school sample ( = 995) was completed with a randomly selected vocational school sample ( = 140) in Budapest, Hungary. Participants aged 14⁻17 years completed the SEYLE project's self-administered questionnaires. D-SIB lifetime prevalence was significantly higher (29.4%) in the vocational school group compared to the high school group (17.2%) (Χ²(1) = 12.231, < 0.001). D-SIB was associated with suicidal ideation in the vocational school group. Different life events were more frequent in the high school than in the vocational school group, and associations between D-SIB and life events differed in the vocational school group compared to the high school group. In conclusion, vocational school students are a vulnerable population with a higher prevalence of D-SIB compared to high school students. Life events and their association with D-SIB also differ in vocational school students compared to high school students. Taking all these into account might contribute to prevention/intervention designed for this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6025121PMC
May 2018

Direct Self-Injurious Behavior (D-SIB) and Life Events among Vocational School and High School Students.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2018 05 24;15(6). Epub 2018 May 24.

Institute of Psychology, Eotvos Lorand University, 1075 Budapest, Hungary.

Although several studies have recently assessed direct self-injurious behavior (D-SIB) among adolescents, it is still understudied in adolescents attending vocational schools: an educational setting generally associated with lower socioeconomic status. After extending the "Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe" (SEYLE) project to a vocational school population, we examined their D-SIB and life event characteristics compared to the high school population. SEYLE's Hungarian randomly selected high school sample ( = 995) was completed with a randomly selected vocational school sample ( = 140) in Budapest, Hungary. Participants aged 14⁻17 years completed the SEYLE project's self-administered questionnaires. D-SIB lifetime prevalence was significantly higher (29.4%) in the vocational school group compared to the high school group (17.2%) (Χ²(1) = 12.231, < 0.001). D-SIB was associated with suicidal ideation in the vocational school group. Different life events were more frequent in the high school than in the vocational school group, and associations between D-SIB and life events differed in the vocational school group compared to the high school group. In conclusion, vocational school students are a vulnerable population with a higher prevalence of D-SIB compared to high school students. Life events and their association with D-SIB also differ in vocational school students compared to high school students. Taking all these into account might contribute to prevention/intervention designed for this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6025121PMC
May 2018

Correlates of sexual initiation among European adolescents.

PLoS One 2018 8;13(2):e0191451. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Sexuality is a physiological component of adolescent development, though early initiation is associated with reproductive health risk. This study aimed at identifying correlates and predictors of sexual initiation in a large multinational cohort of European adolescents.

Methods: A questionnaire addressing socio-demographics, behaviours, mental health and sexual activity, was delivered to 11,110 adolescents recruited from 168 randomly selected schools in 10 European countries between 2009 and 2011. A follow-up questionnaire was delivered after 12 months. The longitudinal association of baseline risk behaviors, psychological attributes and contextual vulnerabilities, with sexual initiation during follow-up was evaluated through simple and multivariable age/sex stratified logistic regression. Multinomial logistic regression measured the association between predictors and sexual initiation with or without coexisting reproductive risk factors, such as multiple partners or infrequent condom use.

Results: Baseline sexual experience was reported by 19.2% of 10,757 respondents (median age 15; IQR 14-15; females 59.6%). This was significantly more frequent among pupils older than 15 (41%) and males (20.8%). Of 7,111 pupils without previous experience who were available at follow-up (response rate 81.8%), 17% reported sexual initiation, without differences between females and males. Baseline smoking (age/sex adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.63), alcohol use (aOR 2.95), illegal drugs use (aOR 2.72), and poor sleep (aOR 1.71) predicted sexual initiation. Stratified analyses showed a particularly strong association in case of younger and female pupils, and, among girls, when initiation was reported together with multiple partners and/or infrequent condom use. Externalizing (i.e. conduct and hyperactivity) symptoms independently predicted sexual initiation. Internalizing difficulties (i.e. emotional and peer problems) were negatively associated with early and risky sexual initiation among boys. Significant predictors included also being bullied, fighting, truancy, and low parental involvement.

Conclusions: Adolescent sexual behaviours are related to non-sexual risk behaviours, psychological difficulties and contextual vulnerabilities. While gateway effects explain some associations, a comprehensive model is needed to understand adolescent sexual behaviours, their physical, mental, and social health outcomes, and their potential positive effects on wellbeing. Tailored interventions may need to consider younger girls as a particularly vulnerable group in view of a strong association between non-sexual and sexual behaviors.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0191451PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5805230PMC
March 2018
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