Publications by authors named "Juan Pablo Pilili"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Investigator HDplex (Qiagen) reference population database for forensic use in Argentina.

Forensic Sci Int Genet 2017 01 18;26:91-95. Epub 2016 Oct 18.

PRICAI-Fundación Favaloro, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address:

Currently, autosomal Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers represent the method of election in forensic human identification. Commercial kits of most common use nowadays -e.g. PowerPlexFusion, Promega Corp.; AmpFlSTR GlobalFiler, Thermofisher scientific; Investigator 24Plex QS,Qiagen-, allow the co-amplification of 23 highly polymorphic STR loci providing a high discrimination power in human identity testing. However, in complex kinship analysis and familial database searches involving distant relationships, additional DNA typing is often required in order to achieve well-founded conclusions. The recently developed kit Investigator HDplex (Qiagen) co-amplify twelve autosomal STRs markers (D7S1517, D3S1744, D12S391, D2S1360, D6S474, D4S2366, D8S1132, D5S2500, D18S51, D21S2055, D10S2325, SE33), nine of which are not present in the above mentioned kits, providing a set of efficient supplementary markers for human identification purposes. In this study we genotyped a sample of 980 individuals from urban areas of ten Argentinean provinces using the Investigator HDplex kit, aiming to provide forensic estimates for use in forensic casework and parentage testing in Argentina. We report reference allelic frequency databases for each of the provinces studied as well as for the combined samples. No deviation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed. A reasonable discrimination capacity and power of exclusion was estimated which allowed predicting an acceptable forensic behavior of this kit, either to be used as the main STR panel for simple cases or as an auxiliary tool in complex cases. Additionally, population comparison tests showed that the studied samples are relatively homogeneous across the country for these STR set.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2016.10.009DOI Listing
January 2017

Testing genotoxicity and cytotoxicity strategies for the evaluation of commercial radiosterilized fetal calf sera.

Biologicals 2010 Jan 28;38(1):135-43. Epub 2009 Aug 28.

Cátedra de Citología, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina.

Effects of 18 commercial lots of fetal calf serum (FCS) after gamma-irradiation and their non-irradiated counterparts were comparatively analyzed on CHO-K1 and MDBK MDL1 cells for genotoxicity [sister chromatid exchange (SCE), micronuclei (MNi), and single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)], cytotoxicity [cell-cycle progression (CCP), proliferative replication index (PRI), mitotic index (MI), growth promotion (GP), and plating efficiency (PE)], and microbiological properties (mycoplasma and bovine viral diarrhea virus contamination). SCE and SCGE were the most informative end-points for genotoxicity since significant differences were found in 44.4% (P<0.05-0.001, Student's t-test) and 61.1% (P<0.05-0.001, chi(2) test) samples, respectively. MI was the cytotoxicity assay revealing the greatest variation, showing differences in 66.7% (P<0.05-0.001, chi(2) test) samples. Thus, these three end-points for screening bioproducts such as FCS were found most suitable for detecting potential geno-cytotoxicants in biological samples; their simultaneous use could be strongly recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biologicals.2009.08.014DOI Listing
January 2010