Publications by authors named "Juan M Gonzalez Velez"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Use of Ballistocardiography to Monitor Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Preeclampsia.

Womens Health Rep (New Rochelle) 2021 20;2(1):97-105. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.

Pregnancy requires a complex physiological adaptation of the maternal cardiovascular system, which is disrupted in women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, putting them at higher risk of future cardiovascular events. The measurement of body movements in response to cardiac ejection ballistocardiogram (BCG) can be used to assess cardiovascular hemodynamics noninvasively in women with preeclampsia. Using a previously validated, modified weighing scale for assessment of cardiovascular hemodynamics through measurement of BCG and electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, we collected serial measurements throughout pregnancy and postpartum and analyzed data in 30 women with preeclampsia and 23 normotensive controls. Using BCG and ECG signals, we extracted measures of cardiac output, J-wave amplitude × heart rate (J-amp × HR). Mixed-effect models with repeated measures were used to compare J-amp × HRs between groups at different time points in pregnancy and postpartum. In normotensive controls, the J-amp × HR was significantly lower early postpartum (E-PP) compared with the second trimester (T2;  = 0.016) and third trimester (T3;  = 0.001). Women with preeclampsia had a significantly lower J-amp × HR compared with normotensive controls during the first trimester (T1;  = 0.026). In the preeclampsia group, there was a trend toward an increase in J-amp × HR from T1 to T2 and then a drop in J-amp × HR at T3 and further drop at E-PP. We observe cardiac hemodynamic changes consistent with those reported using well-validated tools. In pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, the maximal force of contraction is lower, suggesting lower cardiac output and a trend in hemodynamics consistent with the hyperdynamic disease model of preeclampsia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/whr.2020.0127DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8080913PMC
April 2021

Racial/ethnic disparities among women receiving intrauterine transfusions for alloimmunization at a single fetal treatment center.

Transfusion 2021 Mar 21. Epub 2021 Mar 21.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.

Disparities are prevalent in numerous areas of healthcare. We sought to investigate whether there were racial/ethnic disparities among pregnant women with the most severe form of alloimmunization who require intrauterine transfusions (IUT). We reviewed patients who underwent IUT for alloimmunization at a single fetal treatment center between 2015 and 2020. This "IUT cohort" was compared to an "Alloimmunization cohort": patients seen at our institution with a diagnosis of alloimmunization during pregnancy, who did not receive IUT. We collected maternal demographics including self-identified race/ethnicity and primary language, transfusion, and antibody characteristics. The cohorts were compared using unpaired t-tests, Mann-Whitney tests, and Fischer's exact tests, as appropriate. The IUT cohort included 43 patients and the alloimmunization cohort included 1049 patients. Compared to the alloimmunization cohort, there were significantly more patients of Latina descent in the IUT cohort (23.3% vs. 3.4%, p < .0001), and more non-English speakers (18.6% vs. 4.6%, p = .001). Twenty-one percent (9/43) of patients had immigrated to the United States, all of whom had pregnancies or miscarriages in their country of origin. A third of patients had new antibodies identified on serial screens during the current pregnancy. Significantly more women of Latina ethnicity and non-English speakers required IUTs compared to the cohort of women with alloimmunization. Insufficient access to care prior to arriving in the United States and among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States may contribute to these findings. Providers should be cognizant of potential, racial, and ethnic inequalities among women receiving intrauterine transfusions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.16379DOI Listing
March 2021

Placental Abruption as a Risk Factor for Heart Failure.

Am J Cardiol 2020 09 30;131:17-22. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California; Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Complications of pregnancy present an opportunity to identify women at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Placental abruption is a severe and understudied pregnancy complication, and its relationship with CVD is poorly understood. The California Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database was used to identify women with hospitalized pregnancies in California between 2005 and 2009, with follow-up through 2011. Pregnancies, exposures, covariates, and outcomes were defined by International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision codes. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to examine the association between placental abruption and myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and heart failure (HF). Multivariate models controlling for age, race, medical co-morbidities, pregnancy complications, psychiatric and substance use disorders, and socioeconomic factors were employed. Among over 1.5 million pregnancies, placental abruption occurred in 14,881 women (1%). Median follow-up time from delivery to event or censoring was 4.87 (interquartile range 3.54 to 5.96) years. In unadjusted models, placental abruption was associated with risk of HF, but not MI or stroke. In fully-adjusted models, placental abruption remained significantly associated with HF (Hazard ratio 1.44; 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.90). Among women with placental abruptions, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth respectively modified and mediated the association between placental abruption and HF. In conclusion, placental abruption is a risk factor for HF, particularly in women who also experience hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth. Placental abruption is a specific adverse pregnancy outcome associated with risk of HF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2020.06.034DOI Listing
September 2020

Eisenmenger Syndrome in Pregnancy: A Management Conundrum.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2020 Oct 6;34(10):2813-2822. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jvca.2020.02.053DOI Listing
October 2020

Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas head in a pregnant woman: safe pancreaticoduodenectomy postpartum.

J Surg Case Rep 2015 Aug 20;2015(8). Epub 2015 Aug 20.

Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA, USA

Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) of the pancreas are rare and typically arise in young women. The optimal management of a pregnant woman suspected of having an SPN of the pancreas head is unclear. We report such a case where close monitoring for tumor growth was done during pregnancy and a successful pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed after term delivery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jscr/rjv108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4542138PMC
August 2015