Publications by authors named "Juan I Camps"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Spherical Rare-Earth Magnets in the Urinary Bladder in Adolescent Boys.

Am Surg 2020 Oct 7:3134820951459. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

2630 Division of Pediatric Surgery, Prisma Health Children's Hospital Midlands, University of South Carolina - School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003134820951459DOI Listing
October 2020

Laparoscopic Robotic-Assisted Splenectomy in the Pediatric Population: Our Institutional Experience.

Am Surg 2017 Sep;83(9):e358-e359

Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of South Carolina, Palmetto Health Children's Hospital, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

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September 2017

Education and training in pediatric robotic surgery: lessons learned from an inaugural multinational workshop.

J Robot Surg 2015 Mar 17;9(1):57-63. Epub 2014 Oct 17.

Department of Paediatric Surgery, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, UK.

The introduction of robotic surgery into clinical practice brings new and specific needs for education and training. Application to the pediatric setting comes with unique considerations, warranting dedicated training resources that are accessible. A pediatric robotic surgery workshop was convened to address initial education and training requirements. The event was designed to offer an exposure rich environment for delegates to familiarize and learn basic principles in a maximally efficient manner. Pre- and post-workshop survey responses were evaluated to reflect on the quality of the educational experience and scope for improvement. Feasibility and sustainability of such events was further evaluated by reviewing various challenges encountered. A total of 29 surgeons participated in the workshop, with 7 countries represented. The majority of delegates (94 %) indicated they were "very satisfied" with the overall program. Delegates almost unanimously expressed preference and satisfaction for hands-on content. Qualitative feedback favored a stepwise and modular workshop structure, transitioning from didactic teaching to progressively more advanced training. At the basic and intermediate level, this style of event is able to satisfy initial training and educational needs. Feasibility and sustainability of such events is highly dependent on infrastructure resources that have numerous barriers to accessibility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11701-014-0490-zDOI Listing
March 2015

Papillary thyroid cancer in identical adolescent twins with osteogenesis imperfecta and Hashimoto's thyroiditis: is there a genetic link?

Am Surg 2014 Sep;80(9):849-50

Department of Surgery, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

The relationship between Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) remains controversial. Researchers have identified multiple genes that could put patients with HT at risk for PTC. None are related to osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). We present identical twin sisters with OI who developed PTC in the setting HT.
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September 2014

Robotic-assisted Soave procedure in an 18-year-old man with adult short-segment Hirschsprung's disease.

Am Surg 2013 Jun;79(6):E223-5

Department of Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.

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June 2013

The use of robotics in pediatric surgery: my initial experience.

Authors:
Juan I Camps

Pediatr Surg Int 2011 Sep 24;27(9):991-6. Epub 2011 Apr 24.

Division of Pediatric Surgery, Palmetto Health Children's Hospital, Columbia, SC, USA.

Robotic assisted minimal invasive surgery (RMIS) is a new resource popular in some surgical specialties but not yet in pediatric surgery. There are numerous advantages of robotic surgical technology in adult patients well documented in the literature. The purpose of this study is to define the feasibility, safety, and benefits of RMIS in pediatric patients in my initial learning experience. In a period of 24 months, all consecutive abdominal RMIS were reviewed. Chart revision was conducted retrospectively. Demographic data were collected in each patient. Other data reviewed were indications for surgery, surgical procedures, complication rate, and conversion rate to open procedure. Four arms robotic equipment was used in all cases with 3 (5 mm) reusable robotic ports and a single (12 mm) disposable port. A total of 102 consecutive abdominal RMIS were performed in 77 pediatric patients. All cases were performed by the same pediatric surgeon in a teaching institution. The average patient age was 6.2 years (ranged from 4 months to 18 years) with 16 patients <1 year of age. The smallest patient was 4 kg. No cases required conversion to open technique. However, one case was converted to laparoscopy because of mesenteric bleeding. There were five intraoperative complications in three patients: minor bleeding (2), suture orogastric tube (1), and gastric opening (2) with repair. Postoperative complications were noted in four patients: mild dysphagia (2) and Nissen wrap breakdown (2). Although the use of RMIS in pediatric patients is still controversial, it is feasible and safe to perform robotic surgery in children with a low complication rate. In addition, excellent visualization with outstanding maneuverability of instruments is of great benefit. These benefits may offset the increased cost of robotic technology especially in technically complex surgical cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-011-2901-9DOI Listing
September 2011

A novel technique for the surgical treatment of achalasia in children: evaluated with postoperative esophageal manometry.

J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2009 Aug;19(4):589-93

Department of Surgery, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Introduction: The current surgical treatment for achalasia in the pediatric population is the laparoscopic Heller myotomy with or without a fundoplication. Although medical management with serial dilations and botulism toxin injections may offer short-term benefits, surgical therapy offers definitive treatment. In this article, we propose a modified surgical technique that avoids pitfalls associated with the standard procedure and evaluated our results with postoperative manometry.

Methods: Charts were reviewed for all patients having undergone the proposed surgical procedure. Seven patients underwent postoperative manometry, while 12 answered a short questionnaire.

Results: While manometry showed a statistically significant reduction of lower esophageal sphincter tone, from a mean preoperative lower esophageal sphincter (LES) of 56.1 mm Hg (SD = 8.88, 95% CI = 50.36-61.93) to mean postoperative LES tone of 11.69 mm Hg (SD = 11.69, 95% CI = 3.287-20.08; P < 0.0001), peristalsis was not consistently affected, although a trend toward improvement was noted. Symptoms related to dysphagia were noted in 42% of patients postoperatively but were mild, while all patients showed improved feeding tolerance and weight gain. Interestingly, patients with a postoperative LES pressure <12 mm Hg were more likely to have no symptoms, although this LES pressure was arbitrarily chosen and the study was not powered to detect this outcome (chi-square = 3.73, df = 1; P < 0.053).

Conclusions: The proposed surgical technique for the treatment of achalasia in children was successful at improving feeding and weight gain and attaining normal postoperative LES tone; however, underlying esophageal dysmotility persisted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/lap.2009.0122DOI Listing
August 2009

A pure Sertoli cell tumor of the ovary in a 10-year-old female.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2007 Aug;20(4):257-9

Department of OB-GYN, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina 29203, USA.

Study Objective: To document an unusual presentation of a pure Sertoli Cell tumor.

Design: Case report.

Results: We present a 10-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain and diarrhea with no symptoms of puberty. Surgical exploration revealed a metastatic pure Sertoli Cell tumor, which was treated with resection and chemotherapy.

Conclusion: Sertoli cell tumors are rare occurrences and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a prepubescent girl with an abdominal mass.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2007.04.009DOI Listing
August 2007