Publications by authors named "Juan Daniel Aparicio"

7 Publications

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Evaluation of the sequential coupling of a bacterial treatment with a physicochemical process for the remediation of wastewater containing Cr and organic pollutants.

J Hazard Mater 2021 Jun 6;418:126307. Epub 2021 Jun 6.

Planta Piloto de Procesos Industriales Microbiológicos (PROIMI), CONICET, Av. Belgrano y Pasaje Caseros, 4000 Tucumán, Argentina; Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e Instituto Miguel Lillo, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Miguel Lillo 205, 4000 Tucumán, Argentina. Electronic address:

A restoration strategy was developed for the treatment of two artificial liquid systems (Minimal Medium, MM, and Water Carbon Nitrogen, WCN) contaminated with Cr(VI), lindane (γ-HCH), phenanthrene (Phe), and reactive black 5 (RB5), through the use of an actinobacteria consortium, coupled with a physicochemical treatment using a column filled with nano-scale zero valent iron particles immobilized on dried Macrocystis pyrifera algae biomass. The Sequential Treatment A (ST: physicochemical followed by biological method) removed the three organic compounds with different effectiveness; however, it was very ineffective for Cr(VI) removal. The Sequential Treatment B (ST: biological followed by the physicochemical method) removed the four compounds with variable efficiencies. The removal of γ-HCH, Phe, and RB5 in both effluents did not present significant differences, regardless of the sequential treatment used. The highest removal of Cr(VI) and total Cr was observed in MM and WCN, respectively. Ecotoxicity tests (L. sativa) of the effluents treated with both methodological couplings demonstrated that the toxicity of WCN only decreased at the end of ST, while that of MM decreased at all stages of both sequential treatments. Therefore, MM would be more appropriate to perform both treatments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2021.126307DOI Listing
June 2021

Glycerol as a substrate for actinobacteria of biotechnological interest: Advantages and perspectives in circular economy systems.

Chemosphere 2021 Sep 7;279:130505. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Planta Piloto de Procesos Industriales Microbiológicos (PROIMI-CONICET), Avenida Belgrano y Pasaje Caseros, 4000, San Miguel de Tucumán, Tucumán, Argentina; Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e Instituto Miguel Lillo, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Miguel Lillo 205, 4000, Tucumán, Argentina. Electronic address:

Actinobacteria represent a ubiquitous group of microorganisms widely distributed in ecosystems. They have diverse physiological and metabolic properties, including the production of extracellular enzymes and a variety of secondary bioactive metabolites, such as antibiotics, immunosuppressants, and other compounds of industrial interest. Therefore, actinobacteria have been used for biotechnological purposes for more than three decades. The development of a biotechnological process requires the evaluation of its cost/benefit ratio, including the search for economic and efficient substrates for microorganisms development. Biodiesel is a clean, renewable, quality and economically viable source of energy, which also contributes to the conservation of the environment. Crude glycerol is the main by-product of biodiesel production and has many properties, so it has a commercial value that can be used to finance the biofuel production process. Actinobacteria can use glycerol as a source of carbon and energy, either pure o crude. A circular economy system aims to eliminate waste and pollution, keep products and materials in use, and regenerate natural systems. Although these principles are not yet met, some approaches are being made in this direction; the transformation of crude glycerol by actinobacteria is a process with great potential to be scaled on an industrial level. This review discusses the reports on glycerol as a promising source of carbon and energy for obtaining biomass and high-added value products by actinobacteria. Also, the factors influencing the biomass and secondary metabolites production in bioreactors are analyzed, and the tools available to overcome those that generate the main problems are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.130505DOI Listing
September 2021

Use of glycerol for the production of actinobacteria with well-known bioremediation abilities.

3 Biotech 2021 Feb 11;11(2):57. Epub 2021 Jan 11.

Planta Piloto de Procesos Industriales Microbiológicos (PROIMI-CONICET), Avenida Belgrano y Pasaje Caseros, 4000 San Miguel de Tucumán, Tucumán Argentina.

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the remediation of contaminated environments, and a suitable solution is in situ bioremediation. To achieve this, large-scale bacterial biomass production should be sustainable, using economic culture media. The main aim of this study was to optimize the physicochemical conditions for the biomass production of an actinobacterium with well-known bioremediation ability using inexpensive substrates and to scale-up its production in a bioreactor. For this, the growth of four strains of actinobacteria were evaluated in minimal medium with glucose and glycerol as carbon and energy sources. In addition, l-asparagine and ammonium sulfate were assayed as alternative nitrogen sources. The strain sp. A5 showed the highest biomass production in shake-flasks culture using glycerol and ammonium sulfate as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Factorial designs with five factors (glycerol concentration, inoculum size, pH, temperature, and agitation) were employed to optimize the biomass production of sp. A5. The maximum biomass production was obtained using 5 g L of glycerol, 0.25 µL of inoculum, pH 7, 30 °C and 200 rpm. Finally, the production was successfully scaled to a 2 L stirred tank bioreactor.

Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s13205-020-02588-5.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13205-020-02588-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7801532PMC
February 2021

Successful remediation of soils with mixed contamination of chromium and lindane: Integration of biological and physico-chemical strategies.

Environ Res 2021 03 25;194:110666. Epub 2020 Dec 25.

Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), B° Sarriena S/n, Leioa, 48940, Spain; Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, Research Centre for Experimental Marine Biology and Biotechnology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Areatza Z-G, Plentzia, E-48620, Spain.

Soils contaminated by organic and inorganic pollutants like Cr(VI) and lindane, is currently a main environmental challenge. Biological strategies, such as biostimulation, bioaugmentation, phytoremediation and vermiremediation, and nanoremediation with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) are promising approaches for polluted soil health recovery. The combination of different remediation strategies might be key to address this problem. For this reason, a greenhouse experiment was performed using soil without or with an organic amendment. Both soils were contaminated with lindane (15 mg kg) and Cr(VI) (100 or 300 mg kg). After one month of aging, the following treatments were applied: (i) combination of bioaugmentation (actinobacteria), phytoremediation (Brassica napus), and vermiremediation (Eisenia fetida), or (ii) nanoremediation with nZVI, or (iii) combination of biological treatments and nanoremediation. After 60 days, the wellness of plants and earthworms was assessed, also, soil health was evaluated through physico-chemical parameters and biological indicators. Cr(VI) was more toxic and decreased soil health, however, it was reduced to Cr(III) by the amendment and nZVI and, to a lesser extent, by the biological treatment. Lindane was more effectively degraded through bioremediation. In non-polluted soils, nZVI had strong deleterious effects on soil biota when combined with the organic matter, but this effect was reverted in soils with a high concentration of Cr(VI). Therefore, under our experimental conditions bioremediation might be the best for soils with a moderate concentration of Cr(VI) and organic matter. The application of nZVI in soils with a high content of organic matter should be avoided except for soils with very high concentrations of Cr(VI). According to our study, among the treatments tested, the combination of an organic amendment, biological treatment, and nZVI was shown to be the strategy of choice in soils with high concentrations of Cr(VI) and lindane, while for moderate levels of chromium, the organic amendment plus biological treatment is the most profitable treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2020.110666DOI Listing
March 2021

Effectiveness of the Zea mays-Streptomyces association for the phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons impacted soils.

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 2019 Nov 9;184:109591. Epub 2019 Sep 9.

Planta Piloto de Procesos Industriales Microbiológicos (PROIMI), CONICET. Av. Belgrano y Pasaje Casero., 4000, Tucumán, Argentina; Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e Instituto Miguel Lillo, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán (UNT), Miguel Lillo 205, 4000, Tucumán, Argentina. Electronic address:

Restoring polluted sites by petroleum hydrocarbons is a challenge because of their complexity and persistence in the environment. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the performance of plant-actinobacteria system for the remediation of crude petroleum and pure-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated soils. The endophytic strain Streptomyces sp. Hlh1 was tested for its ability to degrade model PAHs (phenanthrene, pyrene and anthracene) in liquid minimal medium. Streptomyces sp. Hlh1 demonstrated the ability to grow on PAHs as sole carbon and energy source, reaching hydrocarbons removal of 63%, 93% and 83% for phenanthrene, pyrene and anthracene, respectively. Maize plant was chosen to study the impact of Streptomyces sp. Hlh1 inoculation on the dissipation of contaminants and plant growth. Thus, maize seedlings grown in soils contaminated with crude petroleum and pure-PAHs were inoculated with Streptomyces sp. Hlh1. Results showed that the endophyte inoculation increased contaminants removal. Maximum hydrocarbons removal (70%) was achieved in inoculated and planted soil contaminated with crude oil, while 61%, 59%, and 46% of hydrocarbons dissipation were registered for phenanthrene, pyrene and anthracene, respectively. These degradations rates were significantly higher compared to non-inoculated systems in all the treatments evaluated. Further, it was revealed that hydrocarbons (C-C) were efficiently degraded in plant-Streptomyces Hlh1 system. Moreover, the inoculation with the actinobacteria resulted significant plant development and enhanced photosynthetic pigments compared to plants grown in the other experimental conditions. The present study provide evidence that the inoculation of maize plants with Streptomyces sp. Hlh1 play a remarkable role in the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons, enhancing plant development in contaminated soils.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.109591DOI Listing
November 2019

Evaluation of the effectiveness of a bioremediation process in experimental soils polluted with chromium and lindane.

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 2019 Oct 11;181:255-263. Epub 2019 Jun 11.

Planta Piloto de Procesos Industriales Microbiológicos (PROIMI), CONICET, Av. Belgrano y Pasaje Caseros, 4000, Tucumán, Argentina; Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e Instituto Miguel Lillo, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán. Miguel Lillo 205, 4000, Tucumán, Argentina. Electronic address:

Bioremediation using actinobacterium consortia proved to be a promising alternative for the purification of co-contaminated environments. In this sense, the quadruple consortium composed of Streptomyces sp. M7, MC1, A5, and Amycolatopsis tucumanensis AB0 has been able to remove significant levels of Cr(VI) and lindane from anthropogenically contaminated soils. However, the effectiveness of the bioremediation process could not be evaluated only by analytical monitoring, which is complex mainly due to the characteristics of the matrix, producing non-quantitative analyte recoveries, or interferences in the detection stage and quantification. However, the effectiveness of the bioremediation process cannot be evaluated only through analytical monitoring, which is complex due mainly to the characteristics of the matrix, to the recoveries of non-quantitative analytes or to interferences in the detection and quantification stage. For this reason, it is essential to have tools of ecological relevance to assess the biological impact of pollutants on the environment. In this context, the objective of this work was to establish the appropriate bioassays to evaluate the effectiveness of a bioremediation process of co-contaminated soils. For this, five model species were studied: four plant species (Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus, Lycopersicon esculentum, and Zea mays) and one animal species (Eisenia fetida). On plant species, the biomarkers evaluated were inhibition of germination (IG) and the length of hypocotyls/steam and radicles/roots of the seedling. While on E. fetida, mortality (M), weight lost, coelomocyte concentration and cell viability were tested. These bioindicators and the battery of biomarkers quantified in them showed a different level of sensitivity, from maximum to minimum: E. fetida > L. esculentum > L. sativa > R. sativus ≫>Z. mays. Therefore, E. fetida and L. esculentum and their respective biomarkers were selected to evaluate the effectiveness of the bioremediation process due to the capability of assessing the effect on the flora and the fauna of the soil, respectively. The joint application of these bioindicators in a field scale bioremediation process is a feasible tool to demonstrate the recovery of the quality and health of the soil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.06.019DOI Listing
October 2019

Actinobacteria consortium as an efficient biotechnological tool for mixed polluted soil reclamation: Experimental factorial design for bioremediation process optimization.

J Hazard Mater 2018 Jan 19;342:408-417. Epub 2017 Aug 19.

Planta Piloto de Procesos Industriales Microbiológicos (PROIMI), CONICET, Av. Belgrano y Pasaje Caseros, 4000 Tucumán, Argentina; Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e Instituto Miguel Lillo, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Miguel Lillo 205, 4000 Tucumán, Argentina. Electronic address:

The objective of the present work was to establish optimal biological and physicochemical parameters in order to remove simultaneously lindane and Cr(VI) at high and/or low pollutants concentrations from the soil by an actinobacteria consortium formed by Streptomyces sp. M7, MC1, A5, and Amycolatopsis tucumanensis AB0. Also, the final aim was to treat real soils contaminated with Cr(VI) and/or lindane from the Northwest of Argentina employing the optimal biological and physicochemical conditions. In this sense, after determining the optimal inoculum concentration (2gkg), an experimental design model with four factors (temperature, moisture, initial concentration of Cr(VI) and lindane) was employed for predicting the system behavior during bioremediation process. According to response optimizer, the optimal moisture level was 30% for all bioremediation processes. However, the optimal temperature was different for each situation: for low initial concentrations of both pollutants, the optimal temperature was 25°C; for low initial concentrations of Cr(VI) and high initial concentrations of lindane, the optimal temperature was 30°C; and for high initial concentrations of Cr(VI), the optimal temperature was 35°C. In order to confirm the model adequacy and the validity of the optimization procedure, experiments were performed in six real contaminated soils samples. The defined actinobacteria consortium reduced the contaminants concentrations in five of the six samples, by working at laboratory scale and employing the optimal conditions obtained through the factorial design.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2017.08.041DOI Listing
January 2018
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