Publications by authors named "Ju Sung Park"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Mercury contamination and exposure assessment of fishery products in Korea.

Food Addit Contam Part B Surveill 2015 10;8(1):44-9. Epub 2014 Dec 10.

a Seoul Government Research Institute of Public Health and Environment , Gwacheon , Gyunggi Province , Korea.

In this study, total (T-Hg) and methyl mercury (Me-Hg) contamination was investigated in fishery products including canned fish, fish sauces, dried bonito and frozen tuna sashimi, collected from retail markets in Korea, to assess dietary exposure. Direct mercury analyser and gas chromatography-electron captured detector were employed to measure T-Hg and Me-Hg, respectively. The highest T-Hg and Me-Hg contamination was present in tuna sashimi, followed by dried bonito, respectively. Canned tuna showed more frequent detection and higher content than other canned fishery products. The weekly exposure estimate indicates that exposure to mercury from fishery products is safe, showing 2.59% provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) for T-Hg, 1.82% PTWI for Me-Hg and 4.16% reference dose for Me-Hg. However, it should be addressed to monitor the mercury contamination in fish and fishery products regularly, to safeguard vulnerable population such as children, to limit intake of these food products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19393210.2014.968808DOI Listing
October 2015

Total mercury, methylmercury and ethylmercury in marine fish and marine fishery products sold in Seoul, Korea.

Food Addit Contam Part B Surveill 2011 30;4(4):268-74. Epub 2011 Nov 30.

a Seoul Metropolitan Government Research Institute of Public Health and Environment , Seoul 427-070 , Republic of Korea.

In 2009, a survey of 177 samples of fish and fishery products from the markets in Seoul was carried out to investigate total mercury and organic mercury (methylmercury) concentrations and to establish a correlation, if any, between total and organic mercury levels. Concentrations of total and organic mercury in canned tuna ranged 0.001-2.581 and 0.003-1.307 mg/kg, respectively; those for fish, such as cod or salmon, ranged 0.012-2.529 and 0.021-0.507 mg/kg, respectively. Ethylmercury was not detected. More than 50% of total mercury in the samples existed as organic mercury. The correlation coefficients (r(2)) between total mercury and methylmercury concentrations of fish and fishery products found to have methylmercury were 0.844 and 0.976, respectively, which was statistically significant. There was a higher correlation in fishery products than in fish. Although there was no product in which mercury exceeded the standard set by the Food Code in 2008, with the exception of marlin steak, a processed food, which contained 1.307 mg/kg methylmercury. None exceeded the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) for mercury. Collectively, the results indicate that fish or fishery products marketed in Seoul, with the exception of marlin, have low levels of total or organic mercury and, thus, intake of these products is not a risk to public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19393210.2011.638087DOI Listing
December 2014

Pinus densiflora leaf essential oil induces apoptosis via ROS generation and activation of caspases in YD-8 human oral cancer cells.

Int J Oncol 2012 Apr 11;40(4):1238-45. Epub 2011 Nov 11.

Department of Medical Genetic Engineering, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu 704-701, Republic of Korea.

The leaf of Pinus (P.) densiflora, a pine tree widely distributed in Asian countries, has been used as a traditional medicine. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer activity of essential oil, extracted by steam distillation, from the leaf of P. densiflora in YD-8 human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. Treatment of YD-8 cells with P. densiflora leaf essential oil (PLEO) at 60 µg/ml for 8 h strongly inhibited proliferation and survival and induced apoptosis. Notably, treatment with PLEO led to generation of ROS, activation of caspase-9, PARP cleavage, down-regulation of Bcl-2, and phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK-1/2 in YD-8 cells. Treatment with PLEO, however, did not affect the expression of Bax, XIAP and GRP78. Importantly, pharmaco-logical inhibition studies demonstrated that treatment with vitamin E (an anti-oxidant) or z-VAD-fmk (a pan-caspase inhibitor), but not with PD98059 (an ERK-1/2 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK-1/2 inhibitor), strongly suppressed PLEO-induced apoptosis in YD-8 cells and reduction of their survival. Vitamin E treatment further blocked activation of caspase-9 and Bcl-2 down-regulation induced by PLEO. Thus, these results demonstrate firstly that PLEO has anti-proliferative, anti-survival and pro-apoptotic effects on YD-8 cells and the effects are largely due to the ROS-dependent activation of caspases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2011.1263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3584576PMC
April 2012

Volatile compounds and antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oils of the needles of Pinus densiflora and Pinus thunbergii.

J Sci Food Agric 2011 Mar 6;91(4):703-9. Epub 2011 Jan 6.

Seoul Metropolitan Government Research Institute of Public Health and Environment, Seoul 427-070, Korea.

Background: To investigate the volatile compounds and the antibacterial and antioxidant effects of the essential oils of Pinus densiflora needles (EPDN) and Pinus thunbergii needles (EPTN), the volatile compounds of steam-distilled essential oils were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Antibacterial activities were analysed by performing disc-agar diffusion assay and determining the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the essential oils. Antioxidant activities were analysed via radical- and nitrite-scavenging activity assays.

Results: The yields of EPDN and EPTN were 0.304% (v/w) and 0.296% (v/w), respectively. In the antibacterial activity assay, the MICs of EPDN and EPTN for Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella flexneri and Proteus vulgaris were < 0.4 mg mL(-1) . In the antioxidant activity assay, the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50) ) of EPDN and EPTN were 120 and 30 µg mL(-1) , respectively. At 1680 µg mL(-1) , both EPDN and EPTN exhibited > 50% nitrite-scavenging activity.

Conclusion: EPDN can be used as a natural antimicrobial substance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.4239DOI Listing
March 2011