Publications by authors named "Jote Markos"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Toward Corona virus Infection Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care at Public Hospitals in Three Wollega Zones, Ethiopia.

Int J Gen Med 2021 15;14:3563-3573. Epub 2021 Jul 15.

Departments of Pediatrics and Neonatology Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Pregnancy is an immune-suppressed state which makes pregnant women generally more susceptible to COVID-19 infection and severe illness. Extensive precautions have been recommended to avoid exposure to the virus. Knowledge and attitude toward the disease play an integral role in readiness to accept public health measures. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice towards COVID-19 among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in three Wollega zones, Ethiopia.

Methods: Institution-based cross-sectional study was employed among 415 pregnant women attending antenatal care at public hospitals in three Wollega zones, Ethiopia from July to August 2020. The data were collected using an interviewer-administered structured questionnaire. The level of knowledge was assessed using 12 multiple choice questions; the score of above or equal to mean was considered as adequate knowledge. Binary logistic regression was performed and the adjusted odds ratio with P-value ≤0.05 at 95% CI was taken as statistically significant.

Results: This study indicates that more than two-thirds (75.4%; 95% CI: 71.1-79.3%) and 43.6% of the pregnant women had adequate knowledge and good practice about the coronavirus pandemic, respectively. The pregnant women who attended secondary school and above and were urban residents were more likely to have good knowledge, AOR = 2.99 (1.7-5.0) and 1.6 (1.2-2.7), respectively. Maternal age ≤ 25 yearsand being an urban resident were the two predictors of good practice of preventive measures, AOR = 1.7 (1.2-2.6) and 2.3 (1.3-4.0), respectively.

Conclusions And Recommendations: The target population demonstrated acceptable knowledge and poor practice toward COVID-19. Health-care providers should give more attention to educating pregnant women at any point of contact; legal enforcement should be implemented to improve practice of preventive measures. Special consideration should be given to those who are from rural areas, and to less-educated pregnant women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S295490DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8289464PMC
July 2021

Magnitude and factors associated with surgical site infection among mothers underwent cesarean delivery in Nekemte town public hospitals, western Ethiopia.

PLoS One 2021 27;16(4):e0250736. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Department of Public Health, Institutes of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) is a serious public health problem due to its impacts on maternal morbidity and mortality and it can have a significant effect on quality of life for the patient. However, little has been studied regarding the magnitude and factors associated with SSI among women underwent cesarean delivery (CD) in study area. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the magnitude and factors associated with SSI among women underwent cesarean delivery in Nekemte Town Public Hospitals 2020.

Methods: An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from January 1/2018 to January 1/2020. A simple random sampling technique was employed to select 401 patient cards from all records women underwent CD from January 1/2018 to January 1/2020. Epidata version 3.2 was used for data entry, and STATA version 14 was used for analysis. A logistic regression model was used to determine the association of independent variables with the outcome variable and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) with 95% confidence interval was used to estimate the strength of the association.

Results: Three hundred eight two (382) cards of women were selected for analysis making a response rate of 95.2%. The mean (±SD) age of the mothers was 25.9 (±4.8) years. The prevalence of SSIs was 8.9% (95% CI: 6.03, 11.76). Age > 35 years (AOR = 5.03, 95% CI:1.69, 14.95), pregnancy-induced hypertension (AOR = 5.63, 95%CI:1.88, 16.79), prolonged labor (AOR = 4.12, 95% CI:1.01, 32.19), receiving general anesthesia (AOR = 3.96 95% CI:1.02, 15.29), and post-operative hemoglobin less than 11 g/dl (AOR = 4.51 95% CI:1.84, 11.07) were significantly associated with the occurrence of SSI after cesarean delivery.

Conclusions And Recommendations: The magnitude of post CD SSI in this study was comparable with the sphere standards of CDC guidelines for SSI after CD. Concerned bodies should give due attention the proper utilization of partograph to prevent prolonged labor, and provision of iron folate to increase the hemoglobin level of pregnant mothers in all health institution. In addition, we would recommend the use of spinal anesthesia over general anesthesia.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0250736PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8079023PMC
April 2021

Predictors of preterm birth in Western Ethiopia: A case control study.

PLoS One 2021 7;16(4):e0247927. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

School of Medicine, Institute of Health sciences,Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Early neonatal death caused by preterm birth contributes the most for perinatal death. The prevalence of preterm birth continues to rise and is a significant public health problem. The exact cause of preterm birth is yet unanswered, as mostly preterm birth happens spontaneously. Predictors of preterm birth in developing countries like Ethiopia were not well investigated, and no study was conducted before this in the study area.

Objectives: To identify predictors of preterm birth in Western Ethiopia, 2017/2018.

Methods: Health facility-based unmatched case-control study was conducted from October 20/2017-march 20/2018 in 4 Hospitals. A total sample size of 358 women was recruited. From this 72 were cases and 286 were controls. Cases were mothers who gave Preterm birth, and controls were mothers who gave birth at term. Ethical clearance was obtained from Wollega University ethical review committee. A pre tested, structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Data entry and analysis was done using Epi Data 3.1 and SPSS version 21, respectively. Logistic regression was done to identify predictors of preterm birth.

Result: Three hundred fifty-eight women participated in this study of which 72 were cases and 286 were controls; making the overall response rate of 100%. Lack of antenatal care visit [AOR = 3.18, 95% CI 1.37-7.38]),(Having 1-2 antenatal care visit [AOR = 2.27, 95% CI 1.18-4.35]),history of previous preterm)[AOR = 5.19, 95% CI1.29-20.88],Short Interpregnancy Interval [AOR = 4.41.95% CI 2.05-9.47],Having Reproductive tract infections [AOR = 2.54, 95% CI 1.02-6.32] and having Obstetric complications [AOR = 2.48,95% CI 1.31-4.71] were found to be predictors of preterm birth.

Conclusion And Recommendation: Risk factors of preterm delivery are multifactorial and depend on geographical and demographic features of the population studied. Hence results of studies from one area might not be applicable to another area. Antenatal care visits are unique opportunities for early diagnosis and treatment of problems. Therefore, antenatal care should be strengthened, and appropriate counseling should be given at each antenatal care follow up. Maintainning optimum birth interval through family planning, and early identification and treatment of reproductive tract infections are mandatory.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0247927PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8026033PMC
September 2021

Obstetric Danger Signs: Knowledge, Attitude, Health-Seeking Action, and Associated Factors among Postnatal Mothers in Nekemte Town, Oromia Region, Western Ethiopia-A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

Obstet Gynecol Int 2020 1;2020:6573153. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

Department of Pediatrics and Neonatal Nursing, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Maternal mortality remains unacceptably high due to pregnancy complications and remains the major health problems in many developing countries such as Ethiopia. Having poor knowledge of obstetric danger signs contributes to delays in seeking and receiving skilled care which in turn increases maternal mortality. However, in Ethiopia, studies are lacking regarding the knowledge level of mothers about obstetric danger signs during pregnancy, child birth, and postnatal periods. In Ethiopia, the proportion of those who have full knowledge of these obstetric danger signs during pregnancy, child birth, and postnatal period is not known. Despite few studies are conducted at health facility level focusing on danger signs during pregnancy, the issue of health-seeking action after identifying danger signs and attitude of mothers towards obstetric danger sign was not addressed.

Objectives: To determine knowledge, attitude, health-seeking action towards obstetric danger signs, and associated factors among postpartum women.

Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Nekemte Town from October 1 to November 30, 2017. Multistage sampling technique was employed to select the total sample size of 621. Ethical clearance was obtained from Wollega University research and ethical committee. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect data from respondents. Data were entered to EpiData version 3.1 and exported to SPSS version 20 for analysis. To assess the associations between dependent and independent variables, binary and multivariate logistic regressions were employed, and the strength of association was presented using odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals.

Result: Only 197 (32.3%) of respondents were able to spontaneously mention at least five key obstetric danger signs during antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum (in the three phases) with at least one obstetric danger sign in each phase and thus were considered as having good knowledge of key obstetric danger signs. Government employee (AOR = 3.28, 95% CI: 1.98-5.42), able to read and write (AOR = 4.92, 95% CI: 2.14-11.3), primary school (AOR = 4.90, 95% CI: 2.11-11.4), ANC follow-up (AOR = 6.2, 95% CI: 1.82-21.21), and ANC visit (AOR = 4.07, 95% CI: 2.35-7.06) were significantly associated with knowledge of obstetric danger sign. From 150 (24.6%) participants who faced obstetric danger signs during their last pregnancy, the majority of them, 137 (91.3%), had a good practice which is seeking a health facility for care. . Despite their low knowledge level and attitude, the practice of mothers in response to obstetric danger signs was encouraging. Occupation, educational status, ANC follow-up, and number of ANC visits were variables significantly associated with knowledge of obstetric danger signs. Health care providers should provide health education and counseling to increase awareness, and appropriate counseling during antenatal care at each visit is of paramount importance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/6573153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7481917PMC
September 2020

Diarrhea and associated factors among under-5 children in Ethiopia: A secondary data analysis.

SAGE Open Med 2020 31;8:2050312120944201. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Objectives: Diarrhea is a major contributing factor for preventable childhood morbidity and death. Despite the occurrence of diarrhea is decreasing, its effect is increasing at an alarming rate among under-5 children particularly in developing countries. The survey was aimed to assess diarrhea and associated factors among children less than 5 years (0-59 months) in Ethiopia with nationally representative data.

Methods: The data were extracted from the Ethiopian National Survey of 2016. A logistic regression model was undertaken to identify the contributing factors for childhood diarrhea. Variables with p < 0.05 were considered as independent predictors of childhood diarrhea.

Results: From a total of 10,641 under-5 children, 5483(51.5%) were males and most of the children (62.3%) were above 24 months. About 10.2% had diarrhea 14 days before data collection, and the majority (93.1%) were born to married mothers. Receiving no treatment or advice for fever/cough (adjusted odd ratio (AOR) = 0.170, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.139-0.208, p = 0.001), being permanent residence (AOR = 0.583, 95% CI: 0.347-0.982, p = 0.043), initiating breastfeeding after 24 h of birth (AOR = 1.553, 95% CI: 1.197-2.015, p = 0.001), and lack of prenatal care (AOR = 2.142, 95% CI: 0.624-0.875, p = 0.001) were independent predictors of diarrhea among under-5 children's in Ethiopia.

Conclusion: The result of this survey indicated that diarrhea is a significant health challenge among under-5 children. To tackle this illness, sufficient education on child and maternal health has to be provided for mothers focusing on predictive factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050312120944201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7406926PMC
July 2020

Awareness of female students attending higher educational institutions toward legalization of safe abortion and associated factors, Harari Region, Eastern Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

Reprod Health 2015 Mar 17;12:19. Epub 2015 Mar 17.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health and Medical Science, Haramaya University, Haramaya, Ethiopia.

Background: Unsafe abortion has been recognized as an important public health problem in the world. It accounts for 14% of all maternal deaths in sub-Saharan African countries. In Ethiopia, 32% of all maternal deaths are accounted to unsafe abortion. Taking the problem of unsafe abortion into consideration, the penal code of Ethiopia was amended in 2005, to permit safe abortion under a set of circumstances. However, lack of awareness on the revised penal code is a major barrier that hinders women to seek safe abortion. The aim of this study is to assess awareness of female students attending higher educational institutions toward legalization of safe abortion and associated factors in Harari region, eastern Ethiopia.

Methods: Institution-based descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among 762 female students who are attending five higher educational institutions in Harari Region. Systematic sampling method was used to identify study participants from randomly selected colleges. Self administered structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were entered in to Epi Info version 6.04 and analyzed by SPSS version 17.0 statistical packages. Frequency, percentage and ratio were used to describe variables. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was done to control confounders and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was used to identify factors associated with awareness of female students to legalization of abortion.

Results: 762 study participants completed the survey questionnaire making the response rate 90.2%. Only 272 (35.7%) of the respondents reported that they have good awareness about legalization of safe abortion. Studying other fields than health and medicine [AOR 0.48; 95%CI (0.23, 0.85)], being the only child for their family [AOR 0.28; 95%CI (0.13, 0.86)], having no boy friend [AOR 0.34; 95%CI (0.12, 0.74)], using family planning [AOR 0.50; 95%CI (0.13 and 0.86)], being 25 years or older [AOR 1.64; 95%CI (1.33, 2.80)] were significantly associated with awareness of female students to legalization of safe abortion.

Conclusions: Only slightly more than a third of the study participants, 35.7% have good awareness of legalization of safe abortion. Strengthening information dissemination regarding legalization of safe abortion is required for female reproductive age group in general and higher institution female students in particular.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12978-015-0006-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383196PMC
March 2015
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